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Search Results: 1 - 10 of 44866 matches for " Michael Melczak "
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“Until they know how much you care”: A qualitative analysis of an innovative practice in community pharmacy
Michael Melczak, PhD,Janice Pringle, PhD
INNOVATIONS in Pharmacy , 2011,
Abstract: Purpose: This qualitative study was concerned with investigating community pharmacists’ thoughts on the use of two brief scales to measure patient outcomes and therapeutic alliance in the context of their Medication Therapy Management (MTM) services. The scales were originally developed for use in behavioral healthcare, but were used in a novel (community pharmacy) setting as part of a previous parent study. We describe this practice (using these scales in a novel setting) as an innovative practice, report on the pharmacists’ experiences with the practice, and discuss relative advantages and disadvantages for integrating the use of the scales as part of routine practice.Methods: Six community pharmacy practitioners participated in a semi-structured interview pertaining to the use of the scales in their MTM services. Pharmacist interviews were transcribed, analyzed according to qualitative content analysis methodology, and presented in relation to the guiding interview questions.Results: Pharmacists had varying opinions on the use of the scales as part of their practice. Initial concerns included patient (mis)understanding about the purpose and proper completion of the scales, as well as apprehension about the use of the information. These concerns were largely resolved through education, repeated use, and routinization. Pharmacists, in general, saw a value to using these scales in clinical practice, for clinical and professional reasons, although there was variability on the degree to which pharmacists integrated the scales into practice after the study completion. Pharmacists had varied opinions as well as on the degree to which the use of the scales would impact medication adherence. Pharmacists were most surprised by how much participation in this study prompted them to reflect on their interactions with patients.Conclusions: Pharmacists, in general, were receptive to participating in the parent study and using two brief scales to measure patient outcomes and therapeutic alliance. Pharmacists had varying opinions on the degree to which the use of these scales could impact patient medication adherence, although they perceived other value and benefits secondary to the interactions. While most pharmacists did not maintain formal use of the scales after study end, they took away general principles of patient-centered care and individualized feedback.
Medication adherence and its relationship to the therapeutic alliance: Results from an innovative pilot study within a community pharmacy MTM practice
Janice Pringle, PhD.,Michael Melczak, PhD,Arnie Aldridge, MS,Margie Snyder, PharmD, MPH
INNOVATIONS in Pharmacy , 2011,
Abstract: Objectives: To determine whether patients who received Medication Therapy Management (MTM) from community pharmacists using a brief scale to measure Therapeutic Alliance (i.e., MTM + TA) would show better medication adherence than patients whoreceived MTM without use of the TA scale (MTM only). Design: Quasi-experimental, using a direct intervention group (MTM + TA) and a comparison group of randomly selected claims records from patients who received only the MTM service (MTM only). We used a doubly robust propensity score approach to estimate the average effect of therapeutic alliance on medication adherence. The analysis was limited to the following broad medication categories: antihypertensives, antidiabetic agents, and antihyperlipidemics. Setting: The direct intervention group included patients receiving MTM services from pharmacists in a community pharmacy chain setting. Participants: After matching with claims data, the direct intervention group was n=117, with an average age of 76.4. The comparison group was n=146, with an average age of 76.2. Intervention: Administration of two brief scales designed to measure general health outcomes and TA within the context of MTM (with focus on TA scale administration). Main Outcome MeasuresProportion of Days Covered (PDC) and PDC80. Results: Using the therapeutic alliance scales in the context of community pharmacistprovided MTM was associated with a 3.1 percentage point increase in patients’ overall PDC (p<.001) and an increase of 4.6 percentage points in PDC80 (p=.02) as compared to patients receiving MTM without use of the therapeutic alliance scales. Conclusion: Measuring therapeutic alliance in the context of MTM is associated with improved medication adherence and represents one strategy for enhancing the effectiveness of MTM encounters. Furthermore, administration of the therapeutic alliance scales used very little time; therefore it is likely feasible for pharmacists to routinely use the scales in their practice.
Does Child Maltreatment Mediate Family Environment and Psychological Well-Being?  [PDF]
Michael Galea
Psychology (PSYCH) , 2010, DOI: 10.4236/psych.2010.12019
Abstract: This study tried to establish if childhood maltreatment mediates the established relationship between family environ-ment and psychological well-being, in a sample of Maltese university students (N = 312). However, our analysis sug-gested partial mediation only. Moreover, results indicated that abusive families are less loving, socially integrated, organized, and more conflicted. Family environment contributed positively, albeit limited, to cognitive well-being after controlling for child abuse history. In particular, cohesion, do add unique variance to subjective well-being, after controlling for child abuse. This study replicates classic research on the important role that family environment plays in children’s holistic development.
Blended Change Management: Concept and Empirical Investigation of Blending Patterns  [PDF]
Michael REISS
iBusiness (IB) , 2009, DOI: 10.4236/ib.2009.12008
Abstract: In coping with the challenges of revolutionary or evolutionary change processes, change managers do not rely on single tools but on toolboxes containing several domains of tools. The impact of toolboxes on change performance depends both on the complementary inter-domain mix and the intra-domain blending of tools. The patterns of blending are investigated both conceptually and empirically with respect to scope, diversity and coupling of tools. Survey results indicate that blending practices are predominantly determined by rational tool evaluation and by task context.
Single Wire Electrical System  [PDF]
Michael Bank
Engineering (ENG) , 2012, DOI: 10.4236/eng.2012.411092
Abstract: The purpose of this article is to remind of the past and present problems of creating single wire electrical systems. This article presents a new one wire electrical transmission system named B-Line which uses one line only and does not use ground as a second line. The proposed method is to work on all frequencies and on all communication systems including DC systems. It also proposes to work on the concept of the single-pole signal source and single-pole signal load. It illustrates the possibility of cutting the cost of electrical lines and several other advantages in the fields of high frequency communication lines and antennas.
Relationship of nine constants  [PDF]
Michael Snyder
Natural Science (NS) , 2013, DOI: 10.4236/ns.2013.59117
Abstract:

Through the process of trial and error, four unitless equations made up of nine constants have been found with exact answers. The related constants are the Speed of Light [1], the Planck constant [2], Wien’s displacement constant [3], Avogadro’s number [4], the universal Gravity constant [5], the Ampere constant [6], the Faraday constant [7], the Gas constant [8] and Apery’s constant [9].

The Counterfeit Electronics Problem  [PDF]
Michael Pecht
Open Journal of Social Sciences (JSS) , 2013, DOI: 10.4236/jss.2013.17003
Abstract:

Counterfeit electronics have been reported in a wide range of products, including computers, telecommunications equipment, automobiles, avionics and military systems. Counterfeit electronic products include everything from very inexpensive capacitors and resistors to costly microprocessors to servers. This paper describes the counterfeit electronic products problem, and discusses the implication of counterfeit electronics on the electronic supply chain. We then present counterfeit detection and prevention techniques for electronics.

Irrationality Re-Examined: A Few Comments on the Conjunction Fallacy  [PDF]
Michael Aristidou
Open Journal of Philosophy (OJPP) , 2013, DOI: 10.4236/ojpp.2013.32050
Abstract: In this paper, I argue that the probability model used to infer irrationality for the subjects in the famous Linda problem is not appropriate, and I suggest different approaches based on fuzzy reasoning models. My line of argument is two-fold: 1) If the term “probability” is understood properly (mathematically), then the experimenters used the wrong model. 2) If the term “probability” is understood casually (non- mathematically), then alternative models perhaps should be used to justify the subjects’ responses. The objective is to experiment with new ways of looking at irrationality and raise a discussion regarding the relation between irrationality, reasoning errors and logical models that are used as frameworks to study irrationality.
User-Friendly: Anthropomorphic Devices and Mechanical Behaviour in Japan  [PDF]
Michael Shea
Advances in Anthropology (AA) , 2014, DOI: 10.4236/aa.2014.41006
Abstract:

Anthropomorphic avatars and disembodied voices have become part of everyday life in Japan. From the animated characters that bow after you complete a transaction at an automated teller machine to the phenomenal proliferation of consumer goods bearing cute faces. There is a discernable growing tendency to anthropomorphize machines. These anthropomorphic devices stand in contrast with the somewhat automated nature of many human interactions. Particularly in the behavior required of employees that work in customer service roles, which calls to mind the demand that workers must often behave as machines from which the notion of a robot originates. Based on research conducted at the National Museum of Emerging Science and Innovation in Tokyo, examples not only of how friendliness can be mechanically produced but also of new devices being imbued with functions to demonstrate their friendliness will be critically examined.

The Economic Challenges of Population Aging in Emerging Markets  [PDF]
Michael Herrmann
Modern Economy (ME) , 2014, DOI: 10.4236/me.2014.52018
Abstract:

Why do studies that examine population aging always come to the same conclusions? Regardless of whether these studies focus on Japan or Germany, Northern Europe or Southern Europe, the developed economies or emerging market economies, they typically suggest that countries will confront a labor shortage which undermines economic growth and that they will confront rising pension and health care costs which call for reduced health care and pension benefits. Are uniform policy recommendations justified because these countries are in fact so similar, or are they rather the result of an undifferentiated and partial analysis? This paper argues that they are the result of a household-focused analysis which fails to take into consideration the very different macroeconomic realities of different countries. From a macroeconomic perspective, this paper examines the broader economic background of emerging markets to understand whether population aging has negative effects on their economic development on the one side, and whether their economic development can cater to an increasing number of old-age dependents on the other.

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