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Search Results: 1 - 10 of 180310 matches for " Michael K. McBeath "
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Paradoxical popups: Why are they hard to catch?
Michael K. McBeath,Alan M. Nathan,A. Terry Bahill,David G. Baldwin
Physics , 2008, DOI: 10.1119/1.2937899
Abstract: Even professional baseball players occasionally find it difficult to gracefully approach seemingly routine pop-ups. This paper describes a set of towering pop-ups with trajectories that exhibit cusps and loops near the apex. For a normal fly ball, the horizontal velocity is continuously decreasing due to drag caused by air resistance. But for pop-ups, the Magnus force (the force due to the ball spinning in a moving airflow) is larger than the drag force. In these cases the horizontal velocity decreases in the beginning, like a normal fly ball, but after the apex, the Magnus force accelerates the horizontal motion. We refer to this class of pop-ups as paradoxical because they appear to misinform the typically robust optical control strategies used by fielders and lead to systematic vacillation in running paths, especially when a trajectory terminates near the fielder. In short, some of the dancing around when infielders pursue pop-ups can be well explained as a combination of bizarre trajectories and misguidance by the normally reliable optical control strategy, rather than apparent fielder error. Former major league infielders confirm that our model agrees with their experiences.
Navigating to new frontiers in behavioral neuroscience: traditional neuropsychological tests predict human performance on a rodent-inspired radial-arm maze
Sarah E. Mennenga,Leslie C. Baxter,Gene A. Brewer,Elizabeth B. Engler-Chiurazzi,B. Blair Braden,Stephanie V. Koebele,Michael K. McBeath,Heather A. Bimonte-Nelson
Frontiers in Behavioral Neuroscience , 2014, DOI: 10.3389/fnbeh.2014.00294
Abstract: We constructed an 11-arm, walk-through, human radial-arm maze (HRAM) as a translational instrument to compare existing methodology in the areas of rodent and human learning and memory research. The HRAM, utilized here, serves as an intermediary test between the classic rat radial-arm maze (RAM) and standard human neuropsychological and cognitive tests. We show that the HRAM is a useful instrument to examine working memory ability, explore the relationships between rodent and human memory and cognition models, and evaluate factors that contribute to human navigational ability. One-hundred-and-fifty-seven participants were tested on the HRAM, and scores were compared to performance on a standard cognitive battery focused on episodic memory, working memory capacity, and visuospatial ability. We found that errors on the HRAM increased as working memory demand became elevated, similar to the pattern typically seen in rodents, and that for this task, performance appears similar to Miller's classic description of a processing-inclusive human working memory capacity of 7 ± 2 items. Regression analysis revealed that measures of working memory capacity and visuospatial ability accounted for a large proportion of variance in HRAM scores, while measures of episodic memory and general intelligence did not serve as significant predictors of HRAM performance. We present the HRAM as a novel instrument for measuring navigational behavior in humans, as is traditionally done in basic science studies evaluating rodent learning and memory, thus providing a useful tool to help connect and translate between human and rodent models of cognitive functioning.
Book Boxes: An Introduction to Literature – with a Small “L”
Neil McBeath
Humanising Language Teaching , 2009,
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Words and Music
Neil McBeath
Humanising Language Teaching , 2012, DOI: 17559715
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The TEFL Teacher, The Cyber-bully, The Closet Racist
Neil McBeath
Humanising Language Teaching , 2009,
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The Unreality of Reality TV
Neil Mcbeath
Humanising Language Teaching , 2011, DOI: 17559715
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Cross Currents: Critical Pedagogy, ESP and Materials Writing
Neil Mcbeath
Humanising Language Teaching , 2009,
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Children of the Revolution: After the Arab Spring
Neil McBeath
Humanising Language Teaching , 2013, DOI: 17559715
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Input Complementarity Implies Output Elasticities Larger than One: Implications for Cost Pass-Through  [PDF]
Michael K. Wohlgenant
Theoretical Economics Letters (TEL) , 2012, DOI: 10.4236/tel.2012.21009
Abstract: When inputs in the firm’s production function are pair-wise complements, I show that all variable factors of the firm are output elastic. Via Silberberg’s analysis, this implies that for given output of a competitive firm that marginal cost will rise more than average cost for a factor price increase. Accounting for changes in output through profit maximization and industry equilibrium change in output price, I show that cost pass-through can be larger than one in a competitive industry when inputs are complementary. Because input complementarity seems likely with commodity aggregates like materials, labor, energy, and capital, this could provide an alternative explanation for over cost shifting in commodity-oriented industries like the oil industry and food industries. This approach also allows researchers to abandon the highly restrictive assumption of constant elasticity of demand function facing the firm that is required under imperfect competition with constant marginal costs.
The Multivariate Rational Addiction Model  [PDF]
Michael K. Wohlgenant
Theoretical Economics Letters (TEL) , 2012, DOI: 10.4236/tel.2012.25086
Abstract: This paper generalizes the model of Becker, Grossman, and Murphy (1994) to the multivariate case. The multivariate model generates Frisch demand functions where current consumption is related to prices of all goods, and lagged and future consumption of all goods. The theoretical restrictions are that current price effects (holding lagged and future consumption constant) are negative definite, and lagged and future consumption are proportional to one another, the proportionality factor being the consumer’s discount rate. The conditions for dynamic stability are derived, and the solution to the matrix difference equation is derived. General formulas for multivariate Frisch price elasticities with respect to different lengths of time are also derived. Finally, alternative econometric specifications are derived, showing how theoretical restrictions can be imposed to test the theory and to reduce the number of estimable parameters. It is also shown how the model can be modified to account for different discount rates by commodity when estimating the model using aggregate data.
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