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Search Results: 1 - 10 of 401892 matches for " Meike Müller-Engelmann "
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Addressing the Negative Self-Concept in Posttraumatic Stress Disorder by a Three-Session Programme of Cognitive Restructuring and Imagery Modification (CRIM-PTSD): A Case Study  [PDF]
Meike Müller-Engelmann, Kerstin Hadouch, Regina Steil
Journal of Behavioral and Brain Science (JBBS) , 2018, DOI: 10.4236/jbbs.2018.85020
Abstract: Background: Cognitive restructuring and imagery modification for posttraumatic stress disorder (CRIM-PTSD) is a new intervention that involves only three sessions and focuses on the self-concept. It combines cognitive restructuring of core trauma-related dysfunctional beliefs and mental imagery. The effectiveness of CRIM-PTSD has recently been demonstrated in a pilot study. Method: This article presents a step-by-step description of the administration of CRIM-PTSD in a female survivor of childhood sexual abuse (CSA) suffering from PTSD and major depressive disorder related to strong self-blame. Results: The intervention showed substantial reductions in PTSD symptoms and depression in the patient comparable to those observed in the pilot study. Conclusions: CRIM-PTSD might provide an economical tool for reducing PTSD symptoms when only a short time is available for intervention. Furthermore, this tool could be included in well-established PTSD treatments. In addition to the pilot study, a randomized controlled trial is needed to further explore the feasibility and effectiveness of this short intervention.
Decision making preferences in the medical encounter – a factorial survey design
Meike Müller-Engelmann, Tanja Krones, Heidi Keller, Norbert Donner-Banzhoff
BMC Health Services Research , 2008, DOI: 10.1186/1472-6963-8-260
Abstract: This method, which so far has hardly been used in health service research, allows to vary relevant factors describing clinical situations as variables systematically in an experimental random design and to investigate their importance in large samples.To identify situational factors for the survey we first performed a literature search which was followed by a qualitative interview study with patients, physicians and health care experts. As a result, 7 factors (e.g. "Reason for consultation" and "Number of therapeutic options") with 2 to 3 levels (e.g. "One therapeutic option" and "More than one therapeutic option") will be included in the study. For the survey the factor levels will be randomly combined to short stories describing different treatment situations.A randomized sample of all possible short stories will be given to at least 300 subjects (100 GPs, 100 patients and 100 members of self-help groups) who will be asked to rate how the decision should be made. Main outcome measure is the preference for participation in the decision making process in the given clinical situation.Data analysis will estimate the effects of the factors on the rating and also examine differences between groups.The results will reveal the effects of situational variations on participation preferences. Thus, our findings will contribute to the understanding of normative values in the medical decision making process and will improve future implementation of SDM and decision aids.Currently we are witnessing a change in the traditional physician-patient-relationship. Shared decision making (SDM) has become increasingly popular in the last decade [1]. Many patients no longer rely only on their physician's opinion about the best treatment. They have gained self-confidence and many of them want to participate in decisions or even be the only responsible decision maker [2-4].Charles et al. [5] point out four conditions that must be met to classify the physician-patient interaction as shared
Local Spectral Deformation
M. Engelmann,J. S. Mller,M. G. Rasmussen
Mathematics , 2015,
Abstract: We develop an analytic perturbation theory for eigenvalues with finite multiplicities, embedded into the essential spectrum of a self-adjoint operator $H$. We assume the existence of another self-adjoint operator $A$ for which the family $H_\theta = e^{\mathrm{i}\theta A} H e^{-\mathrm{i}\theta A}$ extends analytically from the real line to a strip in the complex plane. Assuming a Mourre estimate holds for $\mathrm{i}[H,A]$ in the vicinity of the eigenvalue, we prove that the essential spectrum is locally deformed away from the eigenvalue, leaving it isolated and thus permitting an application of Kato's analytic perturbation theory.
Is gene activity in plant cells affected by UMTS-irradiation? A whole genome approach
Julia C Engelmann,Rosalia Deeken,Tobias Müller,Günter Nimtz
Advances and Applications in Bioinformatics and Chemistry , 2008,
Abstract: Julia C Engelmann3,* Rosalia Deeken1,* Tobias Müller3, Günter Nimtz2, M Rob G Roelfsema1, Rainer Hedrich11Molecular Plant Physiology and Biophysics, Julius-von-Sachs Institute for Biosciences; 2Institute of Physics II, University of Cologne, Cologne, Germany; 3Department of Bioinformatics, Biocenter, University of Würzburg, Würzburg, Germany; *These authors contributed equally to this workAbstract: Mobile phone technology makes use of radio frequency (RF) electromagnetic fields transmitted through a dense network of base stations in Europe. Possible harmful effects of RF fields on humans and animals are discussed, but their effect on plants has received little attention. In search for physiological processes of plant cells sensitive to RF fields, cell suspension cultures of Arabidopsis thaliana were exposed for 24 h to a RF field protocol representing typical microwave exposition in an urban environment. mRNA of exposed cultures and controls was used to hybridize Affymetrix-ATH1 whole genome microarrays. Differential expression analysis revealed significant changes in transcription of 10 genes, but they did not exceed a fold change of 2.5. Besides that 3 of them are dark-inducible, their functions do not point to any known responses of plants to environmental stimuli. The changes in transcription of these genes were compared with published microarray datasets and revealed a weak similarity of the microwave to light treatment experiments. Considering the large changes described in published experiments, it is questionable if the small alterations caused by a 24 h continuous microwave exposure would have any impact on the growth and reproduction of whole plants.Keywords: suspension cultured plant cells, radio frequency electromagnetic fields, microarrays, Arabidopsis thaliana
Is gene activity in plant cells affected by UMTS-irradiation? A whole genome approach
Julia C Engelmann, Rosalia Deeken, Tobias Müller, Günter Nimtz, M Rob G Roelfsema, Rainer Hedrich
Advances and Applications in Bioinformatics and Chemistry , 2008, DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/AABC.S3570
Abstract: gene activity in plant cells affected by UMTS-irradiation? A whole genome approach Original Research (10444) Total Article Views Authors: Julia C Engelmann, Rosalia Deeken, Tobias Müller, Günter Nimtz, M Rob G Roelfsema, Rainer Hedrich Published Date October 2008 Volume 2008:1 Pages 71 - 83 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/AABC.S3570 Julia C Engelmann3,* Rosalia Deeken1,* Tobias Müller3, Günter Nimtz2, M Rob G Roelfsema1, Rainer Hedrich1 1Molecular Plant Physiology and Biophysics, Julius-von-Sachs Institute for Biosciences; 2Institute of Physics II, University of Cologne, Cologne, Germany; 3Department of Bioinformatics, Biocenter, University of Würzburg, Würzburg, Germany; *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Mobile phone technology makes use of radio frequency (RF) electromagnetic fields transmitted through a dense network of base stations in Europe. Possible harmful effects of RF fields on humans and animals are discussed, but their effect on plants has received little attention. In search for physiological processes of plant cells sensitive to RF fields, cell suspension cultures of Arabidopsis thaliana were exposed for 24 h to a RF field protocol representing typical microwave exposition in an urban environment. mRNA of exposed cultures and controls was used to hybridize Affymetrix-ATH1 whole genome microarrays. Differential expression analysis revealed significant changes in transcription of 10 genes, but they did not exceed a fold change of 2.5. Besides that 3 of them are dark-inducible, their functions do not point to any known responses of plants to environmental stimuli. The changes in transcription of these genes were compared with published microarray datasets and revealed a weak similarity of the microwave to light treatment experiments. Considering the large changes described in published experiments, it is questionable if the small alterations caused by a 24 h continuous microwave exposure would have any impact on the growth and reproduction of whole plants.
Serum Level of CC-Chemokine Ligand 18 Is Increased in Patients with Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer and Correlates with Survival Time in Adenocarcinomas
Till Pl?nes, Alexander Krohn, Meike Burger, Hendrik Veelken, Bernward Passlick, Joachim Müller-Quernheim, Gernot Zissel
PLOS ONE , 2012, DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0041746
Abstract: CC-chemokine ligand 18 (CCL18) is mainly expressed by alternatively activated macrophages and DCs and plays an important role in lung fibrosis, arthritis and other diseases. Here CCL18 was measured in sera of 31 healthy volunteers and 170 patients with lung cancer and correlated these data with histology, tumor stage and clinical parameters. Mean CCL18 serum level of the patients with non-small-cell lung cancer was 150(857) ng/ml vs. 32(61) ng/ml in the healthy control group. Patient groups differ significantly according their histology (adenocarcinoma 143(528) ng/ml vs squamous cell carcinoma 187(857) ng/ml, p<0.02). In addition, we found a significant difference between patients with lower versus higher T-stage (p<0.003). Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analyses revealed a cutoff point of 83 ng/ml (area under the curve (AUC): 0.968; p<0.0001) to discriminate between healthy controls and non-small-cell lung cancer patients. ROC analyses to discriminate between patients, who died because of cancer related death and those who died for other reasons did not lead to a valid AUC. To stratify the tumor patients, a criterion value plot was performed leading to a point of equal sensitivity and specificity (54%) of 162 ng/ml. Patients with a CCL18 serum level higher than 160 ng/ml had a mean survival time of 623 days. In contrast, those in patients with a baseline level between 83 ng/ml and 160 ng/ml the mean survival time was 984 days (p<0.005). Survival-analysis revealed in adenocarcinoma a mean survival of 1152 days in the group below 83 ng/ml. In the median group the mean survival time was 788 days and in the group with the highest levels the mean survival time was 388 days (p<0.001). In contrast, we found no correlation between the FEV1 and the CCL18 baseline level. In conclusion, in patients suffering from adenocarcinoma increased serum CCL18 levels predict a diminished survival time.
CC-Chemokine Ligand 18 Induces Epithelial to Mesenchymal Transition in Lung Cancer A549 Cells and Elevates the Invasive Potential
Till Ploenes, Ben Scholtes, Alexander Krohn, Meike Burger, Bernward Passlick, Joachim Müller-Quernheim, Gernot Zissel
PLOS ONE , 2013, DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0053068
Abstract: Lung cancer is one of the leading causes of cancer related death worldwide with more than a million deaths per year. The poor prognosis is due to its high aggressiveness and its early metastasis. Although the exact mechanisms are still unknown, the process of epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) seems to be involved in these neoplastic processes. We already demonstrated that serum levels of CCL18, a primate specific chemokine, are highly elevated in patients with lung cancer and correlate with their survival time of patients with adenocarcinoma of the lung. Therefore, we hypothesized that CCL18 may be directly involved in pathological processes of lung cancer, e.g. EMT. We investigated the effect of CCL18 on A549, an adenocarcinoma cell line of the lung, on EMT and other cell functions like proliferation, chemotaxis, invasion, chemoresistance and proliferation. Exposure of A549 lung cancer cells to CCL18 in various concentrations decreases the epithelial marker E-cadherin, whereas FSP-1, a marker of the mesenchymal phenotype increases. Accordingly, CCL18 induced the transcriptional EMT regulator SNAIL1 in a dose dependent fashion. In contrast, an increasing CCL18 concentration was associated with a decline of cell proliferation rate. In addition, CCL18 induced chemotaxis of these cells and increased their chemoresistance. Therefore, CCL18 may be an interesting therapeutic target for NSCLC.
Explorative data analysis of MCL reveals gene expression networks implicated in survival and prognosis supported by explorative CGH analysis
Steffen Blenk, Julia C Engelmann, Stefan Pinkert, Markus Weniger, J?rg Schultz, Andreas Rosenwald, Hans K Müller-Hermelink, Tobias Müller, Thomas Dandekar
BMC Cancer , 2008, DOI: 10.1186/1471-2407-8-106
Abstract: We compare patients over and below the median of survival. Exploratory principal component analysis of gene expression data showed that the second principal component correlates well with patient survival. Explorative analysis of CGH data shows the same correlation.On chromosome 7 and 9 specific genes and bands are delineated which improve prognosis prediction independent of the previously described proliferation signature. We identify a compact survival predictor of seven genes for MCL patients. After extensive re-annotation using GEPAT, we established protein networks correlating with prognosis. Well known genes (CDC2, CCND1) and further proliferation markers (WEE1, CDC25, aurora kinases, BUB1, PCNA, E2F1) form a tight interaction network, but also non-proliferative genes (SOCS1, TUBA1B CEBPB) are shown to be associated with prognosis. Furthermore we show that aggressive MCL implicates a gene network shift to higher expressed genes in late cell cycle states and refine the set of non-proliferative genes implicated with bad prognosis in MCL.The results from explorative data analysis of gene expression and CGH data are complementary to each other. Including further tests such as Wilcoxon rank test we point both to proliferative and non-proliferative gene networks implicated in inferior prognosis of MCL and identify suitable markers both in gene expression and CGH data.Mantle cell lymphomas (MCL) make up about 6% of all cases of non-Hodgkin's lymphomas. They occur at any age from the late 30s to old age, are more common in the over 50 years old population and three times more common in men than in women. Morphologically, MCL is characterized by a monomorphic lymphoid proliferation of cells that resemble centrocytes. MCL is associated with a poor prognosis and remains incurable with current chemotherapeutic approaches. Despite response rates of 50–70% with many regimens, the disease typically relapses and progresses after chemotherapy. The median survival time is appro
Repeatability of and Relationship between Potential COPD Biomarkers in Bronchoalveolar Lavage, Bronchial Biopsies, Serum, and Induced Sputum
Stefan R?pcke, Olaf Holz, Gereon Lauer, Meike Müller, Susanne Rittinghausen, Peter Ernst, Gezim Lahu, Martin Elmlinger, Norbert Krug, Jens M. Hohlfeld
PLOS ONE , 2012, DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0046207
Abstract: Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) is a chronic inflammatory disease, primarily affecting the airways. Stable biomarkers characterizing the inflammatory phenotype of the disease, relevant for disease activity and suited to predict disease progression are needed to monitor the efficacy and safety of drug interventions. We therefore analyzed a large panel of markers in bronchoalveolar lavage, bronchial biopsies, serum and induced sputum of 23 healthy smokers and 24 smoking COPD patients (GOLD II) matched for age and gender. Sample collection was performed twice within a period of 6 weeks. Assays for over 100 different markers were validated for the respective matrices prior to analysis. In our study, we found 51 markers with a sufficient repeatability (intraclass correlation coefficient >0.6), most of these in serum. Differences between groups were observed for markers from all compartments, which extends (von-Willebrand-factor) and confirms (e.g. C-reactive-protein, interleukin-6) previous findings. No correlations between lung and serum markers were observed, including A1AT. Airway inflammation defined by sputum neutrophils showed only a moderate repeatability. This could be improved, when a combination of neutrophils and four sputum fluid phase markers was used to define the inflammatory phenotype.In summary, our study provides comprehensive information on the repeatability and interrelationship of pulmonary and systemic COPD-related markers. These results are relevant for ongoing large clinical trials and future COPD research. While serum markers can discriminate between smokers with and without COPD, they do not seem to sufficiently reflect the disease-associated inflammatory processes within the airways.
Gene expression of transporters and phase I/II metabolic enzymes in murine small intestine during fasting
Heleen M van den Bosch, Meike Bünger, Philip J de Groot, Jolanda van der Meijde, Guido JEJ Hooiveld, Michael Müller
BMC Genomics , 2007, DOI: 10.1186/1471-2164-8-267
Abstract: After 24 hours of fasting, expression levels of 33 of the 253 analyzed transporter and phase I/II metabolism genes were changed. Upregulated genes were involved in transport of energy-yielding molecules in processes such as glycogenolysis (G6pt1) and mitochondrial and peroxisomal oxidation of fatty acids (Cact, Mrs3/4, Fatp2, Cyp4a10, Cyp4b1). Other induced genes were responsible for the inactivation of the neurotransmitter serotonin (Sert, Sult1d1, Dtd, Papst2), formation of eicosanoids (Cyp2j6, Cyp4a10, Cyp4b1), or for secretion of cholesterol (Abca1 and Abcg8). Cyp3a11, typically known because of its drug metabolizing capacity, was also increased. Fasting had no pronounced effect on expression of phase II metabolic enzymes, except for glutathione S-transferases which were down-regulated. Time course studies revealed that some genes were acutely regulated, whereas expression of other genes was only affected after prolonged fasting. Finally, we identified 8 genes that were PPARα-dependently upregulated upon fasting.We have characterized the response to fasting on expression of transporters and phase I/II metabolic enzymes in murine small intestine. Differentially expressed genes are involved in a variety of processes, which functionally can be summarized as a) increased oxidation of fat and xenobiotics, b) increased cholesterol secretion, c) increased susceptibility to electrophilic stressors, and d) reduced intestinal motility. This knowledge increases our understanding of gut physiology, and may be of relevance for e.g. pre-surgery regimen of patients.Fasting, the act of willingly abstaining from food, is a frequently occurring natural status in humans. Fasting is a popular strategy to manage overweight or obesity, it is a traditional habit in certain religions or societies, and it is an accepted pre-surgical procedure. During fasting whole-body fuel utilization gradually shifts from carbohydrates and fat in the fed state to proteins and fat after a day of fastin
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