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Search Results: 1 - 10 of 1769 matches for " Maurizio Pompili "
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Incomplete oedipism and chronic suicidality in psychotic depression with paranoid delusions related to eyes
Maurizio Pompili, David Lester, Roberto Tatarelli, Paolo Girardi
Annals of General Psychiatry , 2006, DOI: 10.1186/1744-859x-5-18
Abstract: We report the case of a 32-year-old male patient with a five-year history of psychotic depression accompanied by paranoid delusions centered around his belief that his neighbors criticized him and stared at him. A central feature of his clinical picture was an eye injury that the patient had caused by pouring molten lead into his right eye during a period of deep hopelessness and suicidality when the patient could not resolve his anhedonia and social isolation. Pharmacotherapy and psychotherapy dramatically improved his disorder.Severe intentional eye self-injury is an uncommon, but not rare, condition. Such injuries have been documented primarily in Christian cultures [1]. Favazza [1] estimated that there were about 500 cases per year and, according to Favazza and Rosenthal's [2] criteria for self-mutilation, eye self-injury is considered to be a major self-mutilation. Abrasion or introduction of chemical substances into the conjunctival sac has been found in factitious disorder [3], malingering [4], and character pathology [5]. Rogers [6] has suggested that the severity of the eye injury produced is proportional to the severity of the psychopathology. Tapper et al. [7] reviewed the international literature from 1848 to 1957 and found 34 cases of severe, self-inflicted eye injury of which 27 had received a psychiatric diagnosis, including 9 patients with schizophrenia, 13 with affective disorder, and 4 with organic conditions.Self-enucleation or oedipism (the act of destroying one or both eyes) has been described in psychotic patients [8], most frequently in schizophrenics [9]. Feldman and Feldman [10] reported that, after performing self-enucleation, patients were often found with a copy of Matthew's Gospel open at 5:29 where it is states "...if the right eye offend thee, pluck it out and cast it from thee; for it is profitable for thee that one of thy members should perish and not that thy whole body should cast into hell". Apparently, the enucleation enacts a li
Patient outcome in migraine prophylaxis: the role of psychopharmacological agents
Maurizio Pompili, Gianluca Serafini, Marco Innamorati, et al
Patient Related Outcome Measures , 2010, DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/PROM.S9742
Abstract: tient outcome in migraine prophylaxis: the role of psychopharmacological agents Review (4201) Total Article Views Authors: Maurizio Pompili, Gianluca Serafini, Marco Innamorati, et al Published Date September 2010 Volume 2010:1 Pages 107 - 118 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/PROM.S9742 Maurizio Pompili1,2, Gianluca Serafini1, Marco Innamorati1, Giulia Serra1, Giovanni Dominici1, Juliana Fortes-Lindau1, Monica Pastina1, Ludovica Telesforo1, David Lester3, Paolo Girardi1, Roberto Tatarelli1, Paolo Martelletti4 1Department of Neurosciences, Mental Health and Sensory Functions, Suicide Prevention Center, Sant’Andrea Hospital, Sapienza University of Rome, Italy; 2McLean Hospital – Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA; 3The Richard Stockton College of New Jersey, Pomona, NJ, USA; 4Department of Medical and Molecular Sciences, 2nd School of Medicine, Sant’Andrea Hospital, “Sapienza” University of Rome, Rome, Italy Introduction: Migraine is a serious illness that needs correct treatment for acute attacks and, in addition, a treatment prophylaxis, since patients with migraine suffer during acute attacks and also between attacks. Methods: A systematic review of the most relevant clinical trials of migraine headache and its epidemiology, pathophysiology, comorbidity, and prophylactic treatment (medical and nonmedical) was carried out using “Medline” and “PsychINFO” from 1973 to 2009. Approximately 110 trials met our inclusion criteria and were included in the current review. Results: The most effective pharmacological treatment for migraine prophylaxis is propranolol and anticonvulsants such as topiramate, valproic acid, and amitriptyline. Nonmedical treatments such as acupuncture, biofeedback, and melatonin have also been proposed. Peripheral neurostimulation has been suggested for the treatment of chronic daily headache that does not respond to prophylaxis and for the treatment of drug-resistant primary headache. The majority of the pharmacological agents available today have limited efficacy and may cause adverse effects incompatible with long-term use. Limitations: The review was limited by the highly variable and often insufficient reporting of the complex outcome data and by the fact that migraine prophylaxis trials typically use headache diaries to monitor the course of the disease. The results of the different studies were also presented in different ways, making comparison of the results difficult. Discussion: An adequate prophylaxis is crucial in reducing disability and preventing the evolution of the problem into a chronic progressive illness. The implications of the present findings were discussed.
Patient outcome in migraine prophylaxis: the role of psychopharmacological agents
Maurizio Pompili,Gianluca Serafini,Marco Innamorati,et al
Patient Related Outcome Measures , 2010,
Abstract: Maurizio Pompili1,2, Gianluca Serafini1, Marco Innamorati1, Giulia Serra1, Giovanni Dominici1, Juliana Fortes-Lindau1, Monica Pastina1, Ludovica Telesforo1, David Lester3, Paolo Girardi1, Roberto Tatarelli1, Paolo Martelletti41Department of Neurosciences, Mental Health and Sensory Functions, Suicide Prevention Center, Sant’Andrea Hospital, Sapienza University of Rome, Italy; 2McLean Hospital – Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA; 3The Richard Stockton College of New Jersey, Pomona, NJ, USA; 4Department of Medical and Molecular Sciences, 2nd School of Medicine, Sant’Andrea Hospital, “Sapienza” University of Rome, Rome, ItalyIntroduction: Migraine is a serious illness that needs correct treatment for acute attacks and, in addition, a treatment prophylaxis, since patients with migraine suffer during acute attacks and also between attacks.Methods: A systematic review of the most relevant clinical trials of migraine headache and its epidemiology, pathophysiology, comorbidity, and prophylactic treatment (medical and nonmedical) was carried out using “Medline” and “PsychINFO” from 1973 to 2009. Approximately 110 trials met our inclusion criteria and were included in the current review.Results: The most effective pharmacological treatment for migraine prophylaxis is propranolol and anticonvulsants such as topiramate, valproic acid, and amitriptyline. Nonmedical treatments such as acupuncture, biofeedback, and melatonin have also been proposed. Peripheral neurostimulation has been suggested for the treatment of chronic daily headache that does not respond to prophylaxis and for the treatment of drug-resistant primary headache. The majority of the pharmacological agents available today have limited efficacy and may cause adverse effects incompatible with long-term use.Limitations: The review was limited by the highly variable and often insufficient reporting of the complex outcome data and by the fact that migraine prophylaxis trials typically use headache diaries to monitor the course of the disease. The results of the different studies were also presented in different ways, making comparison of the results difficult.Discussion: An adequate prophylaxis is crucial in reducing disability and preventing the evolution of the problem into a chronic progressive illness. The implications of the present findings were discussed.Keywords: migraine, prophylaxis, pharmacological agents, nonmedical treatments, outcome
Ethanol injection is highly effective for hepatocellular carcinoma smaller than 2 cm
Maurizio Pompili,Erica Nicolardi,Valeria Abbate,Luca Miele
World Journal of Gastroenterology , 2011, DOI: 10.3748/wjg.v17.i26.3126
Abstract: AIM: To analyze the long-term prognosis in a cohort of western cirrhotic patients with single hepatocellular carcinoma treated with ethanol injection. METHODS: One-hundred forty-eight patients with solitary hepatocellular carcinoma were enrolled. The tumor diameter was lower than 2 cm in 47 patients but larger in the remaining 101 patients. The impact of some pre-treatment clinical and laboratory parameters and of tumor recurrence on patients’ survival was assessed. RESULTS: Among the pre-treatment parameters, only a tumor diameter of less than 2 cm was an independent prognostic factor of survival. The occurrence of new nodules in other liver segments and the neoplastic portal invasion were linked to a poorer prognosis at univariate analysis. Patients with a single hepatocellular carcinoma smaller than 2 cm showed a better 5-year cumulative survival (73.0% vs 47.9%) (P = 0.009), 3-year local recurrence rate (29.1% vs 51.5%) (P = 0.011), and 5-year distant intrahepatic recurrence rate (52.9% vs 62.8%) (P = 0.054) compared to patients with a larger tumor. CONCLUSION: The 5-year survival rate of patients with single hepatocellular carcinoma < 2 cm undergoing ethanol injection is excellent and comparable to that achieved using radiofrequency ablation.
Suicide risk in depression and bipolar disorder: Do impulsiveness-aggressiveness and pharmacotherapy predict suicidal intent?
Maurizio Pompili,Marco Innamorati,Michele Raja,Ilaria Falcone
Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment , 2008,
Abstract: Maurizio Pompili1,2, Marco Innamorati3, Michele Raja4, Ilaria Falcone2, Giuseppe Ducci5, Gloria Angeletti2, David Lester6, Paolo Girardi2, Roberto Tatarelli2, Eleonora De Pisa21McLean Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA; 2Department of Psychiatry, Sant’Andrea Hospital, “Sapienza” University of Rome, Italy; 3Università Europea di Roma, Italy; 4Diagnostic and Therapeutic Psychiatric Services, Department of Mental Health, Santo Spirito Hospital, Rome, Italy; 5Diagnostic and Therapeutic Psychiatric Services, Department of Mental Health, San Filippo Neri Hospital, Rome, Italy; 6Center for the Study of Suicide, Blackwood, NJ, USAAbstract: The aims of the present study were to examine clinical, personality, and sociodemographic predictors of suicide risk in a sample of inpatients affected by major affective disorders. The participants were 74 inpatients affected by major depressive disorder or bipolar disorder-I. Patients completed a semi-structured interview, the Beck Hopelessness Scale, the Aggression Questionnaire, the Barratt Impulsiveness Scale, and the Hamilton scales for depression and anxiety. Over 52% of the patients were high suicide risks. Those at risk reported more severe depressive-anxious symptomatology, more impulsivity and more hostility. Impulsivity, the use of antidepressants, anxiety/somatization, and the use of mood stabilizers (a negative predictor) resulted in accurate predicting of suicide intent. Impulsivity and antidepressant use were the strongest predictors even after controlling for several sociodemographic and clinical variables.Keywords: suicide, mood disorders, pharmacotherapy, impulsiveness, aggressiveness
Psychiatric comorbidity and suicide risk in patients with chronic migraine
Maurizio Pompili,Gianluca Serafini,Daniela Di Cosimo,et al
Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment , 2010,
Abstract: Maurizio Pompili1,2, Gianluca Serafini1, Daniela Di Cosimo1, Giovanni Dominici1, Marco Innamorati1, David Lester3, Alberto Forte1, Nicoletta Girardi1, Sergio De Filippis4, Roberto Tatarelli1, Paolo Martelletti41Department of Neurosciences, Mental Health and Sensory Functions, Suicide Prevention Center, Sant’Andrea Hospital, Sapienza University of Rome, Rome, Italy; 2McLean Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA; 3The Richard Stockton College of New Jersey, USA; 4Department of Medical Sciences, Second School of Medicine, Sant’Andrea Hospital, Sapienza University of Rome, Rome, ItalyAbstract: The aim of this study was to explore the impact of mental illness among patients with migraine. We performed MedLine and PsycINFO searches from 1980 to 2008. Research has systematically documented a strong bidirectional association between migraine and psychiatric disorders. The relationship between migraine and psychopathology has often been clinically discussed rather than systematically studied. Future research should include sound methodologically-based studies focusing on the interplay of factors behind the relationship between migraine, suicide risk, and mental illness.Keywords: headache, migraine, suicide*, psychiatric disorders
Suicide Soon After Generalized Tonic-Clonic Seizure. A Possible Peri-Ictal Phenomenon?
Maurizio Pompili,Paolo Girardi,David Lester,Roberto Tatarelli
The Scientific World Journal , 2006, DOI: 10.1100/tsw.2006.72
Abstract:
Short-Term Psychodynamic Psychotherapy in Patients with “Male Depression” Syndrome, Hopelessness, and Suicide Risk: A Pilot Study
Gloria Angeletti,Maurizio Pompili,Marco Innamorati,Chiara Santucci
Depression Research and Treatment , 2013, DOI: 10.1155/2013/408983
Abstract:
Clinical and functional outcome in a subject with bipolar disorder and severe white matter hyperintensities
Gianluca Serafini,Maurizio Pompili,Massimiliano Angelone,David Lester
The European Journal of Psychiatry , 2011,
Abstract: Background and Objectives: Neuroimaging studies have found higher rates of white matter hyperintensities (WMHs) in patients with bipolar disorder (BD) of all ages, although whether BD is associated with increased rates of WMHs independently from age and cerebrovascular risk factors is still matter of debate. The outcome of BD associated with severe WMHs is generally poor, but several authors have suggested that some factors could have a protective role in BD. The aim of the present study was to report the two-year follow-up of a woman with BD type I and severe WMH/PWMH lesions who was taking high concentrations of vitamin-D in her nutrition, as well as taking lithium and haloperidol as treatment. Case presentation: A 76-year-old woman was hospitalized for a mixed state BD. She had severe WMHs. She took lithium and haloperidol during the hospitalization and was euthymic at discharge as well as after two-years of follow-up. Her nutrition had a high concentration of Vitamin-D. Unfortunately, it was not possible to give her a second MRI. Conclusions: Although there was probable persistence of WMHs, the patient improved in both mood and quality of life. The possible protective effect of lithium and Vitamin-D is discussed.
Partial Androgen Deficiency, Depression, and Testosterone Supplementation in Aging Men
Mario Amore,Marco Innamorati,Sara Costi,Leo Sher,Paolo Girardi,Maurizio Pompili
International Journal of Endocrinology , 2012, DOI: 10.1155/2012/280724
Abstract: The aim of this review was to summarize current knowledge on the correlation between depressive symptoms with a syndrome called partial androgen deficiency of the aging male (PADAM) and on the potential benefits of testosterone (T) treatment on mood. Despite, the causative nature of the relationship between low T levels and depression is uncertain, many hypogonadal men suffer from depression and vice versa several depressed patients are affected by hypogonadism. Supplementation with testosterone failed to show sound evidence of effectiveness in the treatment of depression. Nevertheless, testosterone supplementation has proved to be effective on some domains significant for the quality of life of aged patients with PADAM (sexual function and cognitive functions, muscular strengths). 1. Introduction Testosterone deficiency or hypotestosteronemia is a widely recognized hormonal alteration associated with male aging [1–3]. Its prevalence may be as high as 30% in men aged 40–79 years [4, 5], and in up to 12% the hypotestosteronemia it can be associated with clinical symptoms [5]. Nevertheless, different levels of testosterone (T) could be associated with the presence of specific clinical symptoms [6, 7]. The joint consensus of International Society of Andrology, the International Society for the Study of the Aging Male (ISSAM) and the European Association of Urology prepared a set of recommendations specifically on the Investigation, treatment, and monitoring of late-onset hypogonadism in males [8, 9]. Laboratory diagnosis of hypogonadism is based on the measurement of serum total testosterone (TT). Although there is no uniformly accepted threshold level for T in older men, TT levels above 350?ng/dL are considered normal and do not require substitution therapy, while TT levels below 230?ng/dL usually benefit from testosterone treatment. When TT level is between 230 and 350?ng/dL, it may be useful to calculate free testosterone (FT), particularly in obese men. FT level below 65?pg/mL suggests that testosterone treatment is needed [10, 11]. In 2010, the Endocrine Society published clinical practice guidelines for testosterone therapy in adult men with androgen deficiency syndrome [12]. The members of the working group agreed that because the normative ranges for TT and FT in healthy young men vary among laboratories and assays (lower TT limits: 280–300?ng/dL; lower FT limits: 5–9?pg/mL) [13], clinicians should use the lower limit of normal range for healthy young men established in their laboratory. Members of the working group disagreed on T concentrations
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