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Search Results: 1 - 10 of 71020 matches for " Maria Grigoriadou "
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An e-project-based approach to ESP learning in an ICT curriculum in higher education
Irene Mamakou,Maria Grigoriadou
Themes in Science and Technology Education , 2010,
Abstract: The interest in the integration of language learning with knowledge/content construction isgrowing around the world leading to Content-Based Instruction (CBI) which emphasizes theconnection between the skills and information provided in the English for Specific Purposes(ESP) course and the technical material taught in their discipline. Interactive teamwork,critical reading and writing, communication skills, negotiation, presentations are some of thevital soft skills for today’s academic and future work environment. Traditionally, ESP involvesa lecture mode where academic literacies and skills such as reading comprehension, writing,and vocabulary are practised. This paper discusses and analyses qualitative and quantitativeresults from the introduction of an e-methodology in two university departments forteaching/learning ESP in the framework of discipline-related, CBI and project work whichenhances and modernizes teaching and learning ESP and develops new study habits forlearners by promoting self-directed, autonomous, active learning, out-of-classroom learningand by encouraging students’ engagement and academic socialisation.
Engaging Students of Senior High School in Simulation Development
Katerina GLEZOU,Maria GRIGORIADOU
Informatics in Education , 2010,
Abstract: In this paper we present a small-scale study investigating the use of the MicroWorlds Pro multimedia programming environment as an authoring tool for constructing models, simulations and multimedia applications with students of Senior High School. We implemented the cross-thematic educational scenario ``Free fall simulation development'' as an open and flexible framework for activities in actual classroom circumstances, exploring two alternate instructional strategies: a) simulation development from scratch and b) use of a preconstructed microworld, and we observed how the students collaborate and interact with the programming environment. The findings highlight the overall process and the differences in the students' levels of engagement and performance, indicating some special features of the programming environment that contribute to or cause difficulty in the creation of an effective learning environment. We attempt to contribute to the discussion on the main parameters of designing, developing and implementing an effective constructionist approach aimed at engaging students in simulation development as a cross-thematic multimedia project.
A Coherent and Integrated Framework Using Concept Maps for Various Educational Assessment Functions
Evangelia Gouli,Agoritsa Gogoulou,Maria Grigoriadou
Journal of Information Technology Education : Research , 2003,
Abstract:
Primary open angle glaucoma due to T377M MYOC: Population mapping of a Greek founder mutation in Northwestern Greece
George Kitsos, Zacharias Petrou2, Maria Grigoriadou, et al
Clinical Ophthalmology , 2010, DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/OPTH.S8974
Abstract: imary open angle glaucoma due to T377M MYOC: Population mapping of a Greek founder mutation in Northwestern Greece Original Research (4156) Total Article Views Authors: George Kitsos, Zacharias Petrou2, Maria Grigoriadou, et al Published Date March 2010 Volume 2010:4 Pages 171 - 178 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/OPTH.S8974 George Kitsos1, Zacharias Petrou2, Maria Grigoriadou3, John R Samples4, Alex W Hewitt5, Haris Kokotas3, Aglaia Giannoulia-Karantana3, David A Mackey6, Mary K Wirtz4, Marilita Moschou7, John PA Ioannidis8, Michael B Petersen3 1Department of Ophthalmology, University of Ioannina, School of Medicine, Ioannina, Greece; 2Department of Ophthalmology, General Hospital of Ioannina “G Chatzikosta”, Ioannina, Greece; 3Department of Genetics, Institute of Child Health, Athens, Greece; 4Department of Ophthalmology, Casey Eye Institute-OHS U, Portland, OR; 5Department of Ophthalmology, Flinders University, Adelaide, Australia; 6Center for Eye Research Australia, University of Melbourne, Royal Victorian Eye and Ear Hospital, Melbourne, Australia; 7Department of Ophthalmology, University of Athens, School of Medicine, Athens, Greece; 8Department Hygiene and Epidemiology, University of Ioannina, School of Medicine, Ioannina, Greece Background: Mutations in the MYOC gene have been shown to explain 5% of unrelated primary open angle glaucoma (POAG) in different populations. In particular, the T377M MYOC mutation has arisen at least three separate times in history, in Great Britain, India, and Greece. The purpose of this study is to investigate the distribution of the mutation among different population groups in the northwestern region of Greece. Materials and methods: We explored the distribution of the “Greek” T377M founder mutation in the Epirus region in Northwestern Greece, which could be its origin. Genotyping was performed in POAG cases and controls by PCR amplification of the MYOC gene, followed by digestion with restriction enzyme. Statistical analyses were performed by an exact test, the Kaplan–Meier method and the t-test. Results: In the isolated Chrysovitsa village in the Pindus Mountains, a large POAG family demonstrated the T377M mutation in 20 of 66 family members while no controls from the Epirus region (n = 124) carried this mutation (P < 0.001). Among other POAG cases from Epirus, 2 out of 14 familial cases and 1 out of 80 sporadic cases showed the mutation (P = 0.057). The probability of POAG diagnosis with advancing age among mutation carriers was 23% at age 40, and reached 100% at age 75. POAG patients with the T377M mutation were diagnosed at a mean age of 51 years (SD ± 13.9), which is younger than the sporadic or familial POAG cases: 63.1 (SD ± 11) and 66.8 (SD ± 9.8) years, respectively. Conclusions: The T377M mutation was found in high proportion in members of the Chrysovitsa family (30.3%), in lower proportion in familial POAG cases (14.2%) and seems rare in sporadic POAG cases (1.2%), while no controls (0%) from the
Primary open angle glaucoma due to T377M MYOC: Population mapping of a Greek founder mutation in Northwestern Greece
George Kitsos,Zacharias Petrou2,Maria Grigoriadou,et al
Clinical Ophthalmology , 2010,
Abstract: George Kitsos1, Zacharias Petrou2, Maria Grigoriadou3, John R Samples4, Alex W Hewitt5, Haris Kokotas3, Aglaia Giannoulia-Karantana3, David A Mackey6, Mary K Wirtz4, Marilita Moschou7, John PA Ioannidis8, Michael B Petersen31Department of Ophthalmology, University of Ioannina, School of Medicine, Ioannina, Greece; 2Department of Ophthalmology, General Hospital of Ioannina “G Chatzikosta”, Ioannina, Greece; 3Department of Genetics, Institute of Child Health, Athens, Greece; 4Department of Ophthalmology, Casey Eye Institute-OHS U, Portland, OR; 5Department of Ophthalmology, Flinders University, Adelaide, Australia; 6Center for Eye Research Australia, University of Melbourne, Royal Victorian Eye and Ear Hospital, Melbourne, Australia; 7Department of Ophthalmology, University of Athens, School of Medicine, Athens, Greece; 8Department Hygiene and Epidemiology, University of Ioannina, School of Medicine, Ioannina, GreeceBackground: Mutations in the MYOC gene have been shown to explain 5% of unrelated primary open angle glaucoma (POAG) in different populations. In particular, the T377M MYOC mutation has arisen at least three separate times in history, in Great Britain, India, and Greece. The purpose of this study is to investigate the distribution of the mutation among different population groups in the northwestern region of Greece.Materials and methods: We explored the distribution of the “Greek” T377M founder mutation in the Epirus region in Northwestern Greece, which could be its origin. Genotyping was performed in POAG cases and controls by PCR amplification of the MYOC gene, followed by digestion with restriction enzyme. Statistical analyses were performed by an exact test, the Kaplan–Meier method and the t-test.Results: In the isolated Chrysovitsa village in the Pindus Mountains, a large POAG family demonstrated the T377M mutation in 20 of 66 family members while no controls from the Epirus region (n = 124) carried this mutation (P < 0.001). Among other POAG cases from Epirus, 2 out of 14 familial cases and 1 out of 80 sporadic cases showed the mutation (P = 0.057). The probability of POAG diagnosis with advancing age among mutation carriers was 23% at age 40, and reached 100% at age 75. POAG patients with the T377M mutation were diagnosed at a mean age of 51 years (SD ± 13.9), which is younger than the sporadic or familial POAG cases: 63.1 (SD ± 11) and 66.8 (SD ± 9.8) years, respectively.Conclusions: The T377M mutation was found in high proportion in members of the Chrysovitsa family (30.3%), in lower proportion in familial POAG cases (14.2%) and seem
Sarita
Elissavet Grigoriadou
Intellectum , 2008,
Abstract: Short story about love and different cultures.
Woman outside a window
Elisavet Grigoriadou
Intellectum , 2010,
Abstract: The present short story describes the role that loss and love play in the life of a seemingly coherent man.
A memoir of everlasting friendship
Elisavet Grigoriadou
Intellectum , 2009,
Abstract: A story about friendship, secret relationships with an unexpected ending.
Reassessing the Function of Grooves in Mycenaean Tombs
Constantina Katsari,Pavlina Grigoriadou
Papers from the Institute of Archaeology , 2001, DOI: 10.5334/pia.163
Abstract: Among the Chamber and Tholos Tombs that were built in Greece during the Late Helladic period are some that show a particular feature: a pair of grooves that are carved on the floor of the stomion (a short corridor that leads inside the tomb), leading from the dromos (a long road that leads towards the tomb itself) into the chamber. Archaeologists have suggested a number of explanations regarding their function; however, none of these seems entirely plausible. In this article, we offer a different kind of hypothesis mostly based on architectural evidence. We will suggest that, rather than being related to ritual practices, the grooves were mainly used to facilitate the construction of the graves.
Primary vs. Secondary Antibody Deficiency: Clinical Features and Infection Outcomes of Immunoglobulin Replacement
Sai S. Duraisingham, Matthew Buckland, John Dempster, Lorena Lorenzo, Sofia Grigoriadou, Hilary J. Longhurst
PLOS ONE , 2014, DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0100324
Abstract: Secondary antibody deficiency can occur as a result of haematological malignancies or certain medications, but not much is known about the clinical and immunological features of this group of patients as a whole. Here we describe a cohort of 167 patients with primary or secondary antibody deficiencies on immunoglobulin (Ig)-replacement treatment. The demographics, causes of immunodeficiency, diagnostic delay, clinical and laboratory features, and infection frequency were analysed retrospectively. Chemotherapy for B cell lymphoma and the use of Rituximab, corticosteroids or immunosuppressive medications were the most common causes of secondary antibody deficiency in this cohort. There was no difference in diagnostic delay or bronchiectasis between primary and secondary antibody deficiency patients, and both groups experienced disorders associated with immune dysregulation. Secondary antibody deficiency patients had similar baseline levels of serum IgG, but higher IgM and IgA, and a higher frequency of switched memory B cells than primary antibody deficiency patients. Serious and non-serious infections before and after Ig-replacement were also compared in both groups. Although secondary antibody deficiency patients had more serious infections before initiation of Ig-replacement, treatment resulted in a significant reduction of serious and non-serious infections in both primary and secondary antibody deficiency patients. Patients with secondary antibody deficiency experience similar delays in diagnosis as primary antibody deficiency patients and can also benefit from immunoglobulin-replacement treatment.
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