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Search Results: 1 - 10 of 462078 matches for " Margaux A Morrison "
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Association between assisted reproductive technology and advanced retinopathy of prematurity
RV Paul Chan, Yoshihiro Yonekawa, Margaux A Morrison, et al
Clinical Ophthalmology , 2010, DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/OPTH.S15587
Abstract: ssociation between assisted reproductive technology and advanced retinopathy of prematurity Original Research (3715) Total Article Views Authors: RV Paul Chan, Yoshihiro Yonekawa, Margaux A Morrison, et al Published Date November 2010 Volume 2010:4 Pages 1385 - 1390 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/OPTH.S15587 RV Paul Chan1, Yoshihiro Yonekawa1, Margaux A Morrison2,3, Grace Sun1, Ryan K Wong1, Jeffrey M Perlman4, Michael F Chiang5,6, Thomas C Lee7, M Elizabeth Hartnett3, Margaret M DeAngelis2,3 1Department of Ophthalmology, Weill Cornell Medical College, New York; 2Ocular Molecular Genetics Institute, Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts; 3University of Utah School of Medicine, Moran Eye Center, Salt Lake City, Utah; 4Department of Pediatrics, Weill Cornell Medical College, New York; Departments of 5Ophthalmology and 6Biomedical Informatics, Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons, New York; 7The Vision Center, Children’s Hospital Los Angeles, California, USA Purpose: To investigate the associations between assisted reproductive technology (ART) and severe retinopathy of prematurity (ROP) requiring treatment. Methods: Retrospective analyses of inborn preterm infants screened for severe ROP at the Weill Cornell Medical Center Neonatal Intensive Care Unit at the New York-Presbyterian Hospital by single factor logistic regression and multifactor models. Results: Of 399 ethnically diverse infants, 253 were conceived naturally and 146 by ART. Eight (3.16%) patients conceived naturally, and 11 (7.53%) with ART required laser treatment. In multifactor analyses, significant risks for severe ROP requiring treatment included both gestational age (odds ratio [OR] 0.34; 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.23–0.52; P< 0.001) and ART ([OR] 4.70; [CI], 1.52–4.57; P = 0.007). Conclusions: ART is associated with severe ROP requiring treatment in this cohort. This is the first report that demonstrates a statistically significant association between ART and severe ROP requiring treatment in infants in the US.
Association between assisted reproductive technology and advanced retinopathy of prematurity
RV Paul Chan,Yoshihiro Yonekawa,Margaux A Morrison,et al
Clinical Ophthalmology , 2010,
Abstract: RV Paul Chan1, Yoshihiro Yonekawa1, Margaux A Morrison2,3, Grace Sun1, Ryan K Wong1, Jeffrey M Perlman4, Michael F Chiang5,6, Thomas C Lee7, M Elizabeth Hartnett3, Margaret M DeAngelis2,31Department of Ophthalmology, Weill Cornell Medical College, New York; 2Ocular Molecular Genetics Institute, Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts; 3University of Utah School of Medicine, Moran Eye Center, Salt Lake City, Utah; 4Department of Pediatrics, Weill Cornell Medical College, New York; Departments of 5Ophthalmology and 6Biomedical Informatics, Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons, New York; 7The Vision Center, Children’s Hospital Los Angeles, California, USAPurpose: To investigate the associations between assisted reproductive technology (ART) and severe retinopathy of prematurity (ROP) requiring treatment. Methods: Retrospective analyses of inborn preterm infants screened for severe ROP at the Weill Cornell Medical Center Neonatal Intensive Care Unit at the New York-Presbyterian Hospital by single factor logistic regression and multifactor models.Results: Of 399 ethnically diverse infants, 253 were conceived naturally and 146 by ART. Eight (3.16%) patients conceived naturally, and 11 (7.53%) with ART required laser treatment. In multifactor analyses, significant risks for severe ROP requiring treatment included both gestational age (odds ratio [OR] 0.34; 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.23–0.52; P< 0.001) and ART ([OR] 4.70; [CI], 1.52–4.57; P = 0.007).Conclusions: ART is associated with severe ROP requiring treatment in this cohort. This is the first report that demonstrates a statistically significant association between ART and severe ROP requiring treatment in infants in the US.Keywords: retinopathy of prematurity, low birth rate, blindness, assisted reproductive technology
Identifying subtypes of patients with neovascular age-related macular degeneration by genotypic and cardiovascular risk characteristics
Michael Feehan, John Hartman, Richard Durante, Margaux A Morrison, Joan W Miller, Ivana K Kim, Margaret M DeAngelis
BMC Medical Genetics , 2011, DOI: 10.1186/1471-2350-12-83
Abstract: We identified a sample of patients with neovascular AMD, that in previous studies had been shown to be at elevated risk for the disease through environmental factors such as cigarette smoking and genetic variants including the complement factor H gene (CFH) on chromosome 1q25 and variants in the ARMS2/HtrA serine peptidase 1 (HTRA1) gene(s) on chromosome 10q26. We conducted a multivariate segmentation analysis of 253 of these patients utilizing available epidemiologic and genetic data.In a multivariate model, cigarette smoking failed to differentiate subtypes of patients. However, four meaningfully distinct clusters of patients were identified that were most strongly differentiated by their cardiovascular health status (histories of hypercholesterolemia and hypertension), and the alleles of ARMS2/HTRA1 rs1049331.These results have significant personalized medicine implications for drug developers attempting to determine the effective size of the treatable neovascular AMD population. Patient subtypes or clusters may represent different targets for therapeutic development based on genetic pathways in AMD and cardiovascular pathology, and treatments developed that may elevate CV risk, may be ill advised for certain of the clusters identified.The current medical literature is increasing weekly with studies identifying DNA variants and their possible interaction with environmental factors that may have impact on risk of disease. The growth of such studies has been spurred by the promise of understanding the genetic and environmental basis of complex diseases, and the possibility of identifying therapeutically responsive targets for drug development. Enormous numbers of DNA variants have been associated with diseases and traits and this number will only grow as it becomes economically feasible to sequence an individual patient's entire genome[1].One key data interpretation challenge lies in how best to assess the phenotypic heterogeneity and risk factor heterogeneity with
The NEI/NCBI dbGAP database: Genotypes and haplotypes that may specifically predispose to risk of neovascular age-related macular degeneration
Hong Zhang, Margaux A Morrison, Andy DeWan, Scott Adams, Michael Andreoli, Nancy Huynh, Maureen Regan, Alison Brown, Joan W Miller, Ivana K Kim, Josephine Hoh, Margaret M DeAngelis
BMC Medical Genetics , 2008, DOI: 10.1186/1471-2350-9-51
Abstract: Before release of individual data, p-value information was obtained directly from the AREDS dbGAP website. Of the 35 variants with P < 10-6 examined, 23 significantly modified risk of neovascular AMD. Many variants located in tandem on 1q32-q22 including those in CFH, CFHR4, CFHR2, CFHR5, F13B, ASPM and ZBTB were significantly associated with AMD risk. Of these variants, single SNP analysis revealed that CFH rs572515 was the most significantly associated with AMD risk (P < 10-6). Haplotype analysis supported our findings of single SNP association, demonstrating that the most significant haplotype, GATAGTTCTC, spanning CFH, CFHR4, and CFHR2 was associated with the greatest risk of developing neovascular AMD (P < 10-6). Other than variants on 1q32-q22, only two SNPs, rs9288410 (MAP2) on 2q34-q35 and rs2014307 (PLEKHA1/HTRA1) on 10q26 were significantly associated with AMD status (P = .03 and P < 10-6 respectively). After controlling for smoking history, gender and age, the most significant gene-gene interaction appears to be between rs10801575 (CFH) and rs2014307 (PLEKHA1/HTRA1) (P < 10-11). The best genotypic fit for rs10801575 and rs2014307 was an additive model based on LRT. After applying a Bonferonni correction, no other significant interactions were identified between any other SNPs.This is the first replication study on the NEI dbGAP SNPs, demonstrating that alleles on 1q, 2q and 10q may predispose an individual to AMD.Advanced age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the most common cause of legal blindness in developed countries. Clinically two forms of advanced AMD are recognized: geographic atrophy and neovascular. Geographic atrophy is characterized by a slow progressive degeneration of the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE), resulting in the gradual loss of the photoreceptors. The neovascular form is characterized by the growth of new abnormal blood vessels from beneath the retina that can cause severe and rapid vision loss due to hemorrhage and exudation.
Genetic Variations Strongly Influence Phenotypic Outcome in the Mouse Retina
Austin S. Jelcick, Yang Yuan, Barrett D. Leehy, Lakeisha C. Cox, Alexandra C. Silveira, Fang Qiu, Sarah Schenk, Andrew J. Sachs, Margaux A. Morrison, Arne M. Nystuen, Margaret M. DeAngelis, Neena B. Haider
PLOS ONE , 2011, DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0021858
Abstract: Variation in genetic background can significantly influence the phenotypic outcome of both disease and non-disease associated traits. Additionally, differences in temporal and strain specific gene expression can also contribute to phenotypes in the mammalian retina. This is the first report of microarray based cross-strain analysis of gene expression in the retina investigating genetic background effects. Microarray analyses were performed on retinas from the following mouse strains: C57BL6/J, AKR/J, CAST/EiJ, and NOD.NON-H2-nb1 at embryonic day 18.5 (E18.5) and postnatal day 30.5 (P30.5). Over 3000 differentially expressed genes were identified between strains and developmental stages. Differential gene expression was confirmed by qRT-PCR, Western blot, and immunohistochemistry. Three major gene networks were identified that function to regulate retinal or photoreceptor development, visual perception, cellular transport, and signal transduction. Many of the genes in these networks are implicated in retinal diseases such as bradyopsia, night-blindness, and cone-rod dystrophy. Our analysis revealed strain specific variations in cone photoreceptor cell patterning and retinal function. This study highlights the substantial impact of genetic background on both development and function of the retina and the level of gene expression differences tolerated for normal retinal function. These strain specific genetic variations may also be present in other tissues. In addition, this study will provide valuable insight for the development of more accurate models for human retinal diseases.
RU486 Reversal of Cortisol Repression of 1,25-Dihydroxyvitamin D3 Induction of the Human Osteocalcin Promoter  [PDF]
Nigel A. Morrison
Open Journal of Endocrine and Metabolic Diseases (OJEMD) , 2013, DOI: 10.4236/ojemd.2013.31009
Abstract:

In conditions of corticosteroid excess, such as Cushing’s syndrome, a reduction in serum osteocalcin is observed and bone loss occurs. The human osteocalcin gene is induced by 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 derivatives and repressed by glucocorticoids. In this paper we show that cortisol, a natural glucocorticoid, represses both basal and vitamin D induced activity of the human osteocalcin promoter. Furthermore, we address the specific question as to whether the anti-progestin anti-glucocorticoid RU486 is able to antagonize the inhibitory effect of cortisol on osteocalcin gene expression. We show that RU486 has agonist activity alone, in that it is able to repress the basal promoter activity of the osteocalcin gene and antagonist activity, reversing incompletely the cortisol mediated repression of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 induction.

Influence of ROBO1 and RORA on Risk of Age-Related Macular Degeneration Reveals Genetically Distinct Phenotypes in Disease Pathophysiology
Gyungah Jun, Michael Nicolaou, Margaux A. Morrison, Jacqueline Buros, Denise J. Morgan, Monte J. Radeke, Yoshihiro Yonekawa, Evangelia E. Tsironi, Maria G. Kotoula, Fani Zacharaki, Nissa Mollema, Yang Yuan, Joan W. Miller, Neena B. Haider, Gregory S. Hageman, Ivana K. Kim, Debra A. Schaumberg, Lindsay A. Farrer, Margaret M. DeAngelis
PLOS ONE , 2011, DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0025775
Abstract: ROBO1 is a strong candidate gene for age-related macular degeneration (AMD) based upon its location under a linkage peak on chromosome 3p12, its expression pattern, and its purported function in a pathway that includes RORA, a gene previously associated with risk for neovascular AMD. Previously, we observed that expression of ROBO1 and RORA is down-regulated among wet AMD cases, as compared to their unaffected siblings. Thus, we hypothesized that contribution of association signals in ROBO1, and interaction between these two genes may be important for both wet and dry AMD. We evaluated association of 19 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in ROBO1 with wet and dry stages of AMD in a sibling cohort and a Greek case-control cohort containing 491 wet AMD cases, 174 dry AMD cases and 411 controls. Association signals and interaction results were replicated in an independent prospective cohort (1070 controls, 164 wet AMD cases, 293 dry AMD cases). The most significantly associated ROBO1 SNPs were rs1387665 under an additive model (meta P = 0.028) for wet AMD and rs9309833 under a recessive model (meta P = 6×10?4) for dry AMD. Further analyses revealed interaction between ROBO1 rs9309833 and RORA rs8034864 for both wet and dry AMD (interaction P<0.05). These studies were further supported by whole transcriptome expression profile studies from 66 human donor eyes and chromatin immunoprecipitation assays from mouse retinas. These findings suggest that distinct ROBO1 variants may influence the risk of wet and dry AMD, and the effects of ROBO1 on AMD risk may be modulated by RORA variants.
A Legacy of Derogation: Prejudice toward Aboriginal Persons in Canada  [PDF]
Todd G. Morrison, Melanie A. Morrison, Tomas Borsa
Psychology (PSYCH) , 2014, DOI: 10.4236/psych.2014.59112
Abstract:

Interpersonal prejudice toward Aboriginal men and women has, to date, received little attention from Canadian social psychologists. The present study sought to address this omission by examining the correlates of Old-Fashioned Prejudice (O-PATAS) and Modern Prejudice (M-PATAS) toward Aboriginal persons. Data from two samples (Sample 1: n = 280, 71.6% females; Sample 2: n = 163, 70.9% females) were used. As predicted, in Sample 1, respondents evidenced greater levels of modern prejudice than old-fashioned prejudice, and both forms correlated positively with social dominance orientation, right-wing authoritarianism and negativity toward other stigmatized groups (specifically, gay men and overweight persons). For Sample 2, modern prejudice toward Aboriginal people correlated negatively with empathy as well as self-reported contact with Aboriginal people. However, no association was observed between scores on the M-PATAS and a multifaceted measure of religiosity.

Systems biology-based analysis implicates a novel role for vitamin D metabolism in the pathogenesis of age-related macular degeneration
Margaux A Morrison, Alexandra C Silveira, Nancy Huynh, Gyungah Jun, Silvia E Smith, Fani Zacharaki, Hajime Sato, Stephanie Loomis, Michael T Andreoli, Scott M Adams, Monte J Radeke, Austin S Jelcick, Yang Yuan, Aristoteles N Tsiloulis, Dimitrios Z Chatzoulis, Giuliana Silvestri, Maria G Kotoula, Evangelia E Tsironi, Bruce W Hollis, Rui Chen, Neena B Haider, Joan W Miller, Lindsay A Farrer, Gregory S Hageman, Ivana K Kim, Debra A Schaumberg, Margaret M DeAngelis
Human Genomics , 2011, DOI: 10.1186/1479-7364-5-6-538
Abstract: Based on the relationship between ultraviolet irradiance and vitamin D production, we employed a candidate gene approach for evaluating common variation in key vitamin D pathway genes (the genes encoding the vitamin D receptor [VDR]; cytochrome P450, family 27, subfamily B, polypeptide 1 [CYP27B1]; cytochrome P450, family 24, subfamily A, polypeptide 1 [CYP24A1]; and CYP27A1) in this same family-based cohort. Initial findings were then validated and replicated in the extended family cohort, an unrelated case-control cohort from central Greece and a prospective nested case-control population from the Nurse's Health Study and Health Professionals Follow-Up Studies, which included patients with all subtypes of AMD for a total of 2,528 individuals. Single point variants in CYP24A1 (the gene encoding the catabolising enzyme of the vitamin D pathway) were demonstrated to influence AMD risk after controlling for smoking history, sex and age in all populations, both separately and, more importantly, in a meta-analysis. This is the first report demonstrating a genetic association between vitamin D metabolism and AMD risk. These findings were also supplemented with expression data from human donor eyes and human retinal cell lines. These data not only extend previous biological studies in the AMD field, but further emphasise common antecedents between several disorders with an inflammatory/immunogenic component such as cardiovascular disease, cancer and AMD.Several biological processes/cellular pathways involved in conditions such as cancer, cardiovascular disease and type 1 diabetes have also been implicated in the pathophysiology of the neovascular form of age-related macular degeneration (AMD). AMD, a disease characterised by the loss of ability to drive, recognise faces and read, is the leading cause of blindness in the US elderly population. Most prominent among these shared disease-associated processes is angiogenesis, the defining hallmark of neovascular AMD [1-3]. Add
Snooki, Whale Sperm, and Google: The Unfortunate Extinction Of Librarians When They Are Needed Most
Margaux DelGuidice
In the Library with the Lead Pipe , 2012,
Abstract: “Google can bring you back 100,000 answers. A librarian can bring you back the right one.” — Neil Gaiman The night before I was scheduled to return to work after summer vacation I was lying in bed, staring at the ceiling trying to quiet my thoughts and reset my body into work mode. Unfortunately I [...]
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