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Search Results: 1 - 10 of 15192 matches for " Marco Innamorati "
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Affetto e pensiero nel modello Klein-Bion
Diego Sarracino,Marco Innamorati
Rivista Internazionale di Filosofia e Psicologia , 2010,
Abstract: Affect and Thought in the Klein-Bion Model - This paper investigates the development of the psychoanalytic theory of affect according to the Klein/Bion approach, with special regard to the relationship between affect and thought which has strategic importance in the complex picture in post-war Anglo-Saxon psychoanalysis. Klein’s contributions on affect are discussed and confronted with the other elements of the psychological world: representations, drives, objects and positions. The second part of the paper presents and discusses Bion’s theory of “emotional experiences”, in which a primordial identity between thought and feelings generates every form of knowledge.
Lo specchio dell'ambivalenza. Wittgenstein e la psicoanalisi
Marco Innamorati,Diego Sarracino
Rivista Internazionale di Filosofia e Psicologia , 2011,
Abstract: The Mirror of Ambivalence: Wittgenstein and Psychoanalysis - The relationship between Witt-genstein and Freud has intrigued many critics and has been interpreted in various ways. However, few people have noted how Wittgenstein’s view of psychoanalysis is marked by deep ambivalence – a fact that cannot be overlooked in interpreting both his appreciation and criticism of Freud. This paper discusses how Wittgenstein’s arguments contra Freud, even where justifiable and not merely idiosyncratic, have been surpassed by the post-Freudian developments in psychoanalytic theory. Moreover, it is suggested that psychoanalysis itself, by postulating the existence of the unconscious, is incompatible with one of the most deep-rooted ideas in the “second Wittgenstein” – that is, the impossibility of a “private language”.
Training Analysis: A Historical View
Marco Innamorati,Diego Sarracino
Rivista Internazionale di Filosofia e Psicologia , 2012,
Abstract: The obligatory nature of training analysis, i.e. of the personal analysis of every candidate analyst, was adopted by all psychoanalytic institutes in Freud’s lifetime. But what had initially been a not particularly burdensome addition to training was subsequently transformed into something quite different. Years of analysis: hundreds of hours at vast expense to the candidate, in the face of a basic unconcern on the part of the schools about undertaking empirical studies or even just examining more closely the theoretical justification (apart from the constantly reasserted need for completeness) for such a commitment. The considerable resistance to questioning this practice goes hand in hand with the persistent circulation of a series of legends about its origin. An accurate historical review should offer interesting matter for consideration, showing how the custom of requiring training analysis is underpinned by reasons of an institutional nature rather than by theoretical necessity or empirical findings.
Patient outcome in migraine prophylaxis: the role of psychopharmacological agents
Maurizio Pompili, Gianluca Serafini, Marco Innamorati, et al
Patient Related Outcome Measures , 2010, DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/PROM.S9742
Abstract: tient outcome in migraine prophylaxis: the role of psychopharmacological agents Review (4201) Total Article Views Authors: Maurizio Pompili, Gianluca Serafini, Marco Innamorati, et al Published Date September 2010 Volume 2010:1 Pages 107 - 118 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/PROM.S9742 Maurizio Pompili1,2, Gianluca Serafini1, Marco Innamorati1, Giulia Serra1, Giovanni Dominici1, Juliana Fortes-Lindau1, Monica Pastina1, Ludovica Telesforo1, David Lester3, Paolo Girardi1, Roberto Tatarelli1, Paolo Martelletti4 1Department of Neurosciences, Mental Health and Sensory Functions, Suicide Prevention Center, Sant’Andrea Hospital, Sapienza University of Rome, Italy; 2McLean Hospital – Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA; 3The Richard Stockton College of New Jersey, Pomona, NJ, USA; 4Department of Medical and Molecular Sciences, 2nd School of Medicine, Sant’Andrea Hospital, “Sapienza” University of Rome, Rome, Italy Introduction: Migraine is a serious illness that needs correct treatment for acute attacks and, in addition, a treatment prophylaxis, since patients with migraine suffer during acute attacks and also between attacks. Methods: A systematic review of the most relevant clinical trials of migraine headache and its epidemiology, pathophysiology, comorbidity, and prophylactic treatment (medical and nonmedical) was carried out using “Medline” and “PsychINFO” from 1973 to 2009. Approximately 110 trials met our inclusion criteria and were included in the current review. Results: The most effective pharmacological treatment for migraine prophylaxis is propranolol and anticonvulsants such as topiramate, valproic acid, and amitriptyline. Nonmedical treatments such as acupuncture, biofeedback, and melatonin have also been proposed. Peripheral neurostimulation has been suggested for the treatment of chronic daily headache that does not respond to prophylaxis and for the treatment of drug-resistant primary headache. The majority of the pharmacological agents available today have limited efficacy and may cause adverse effects incompatible with long-term use. Limitations: The review was limited by the highly variable and often insufficient reporting of the complex outcome data and by the fact that migraine prophylaxis trials typically use headache diaries to monitor the course of the disease. The results of the different studies were also presented in different ways, making comparison of the results difficult. Discussion: An adequate prophylaxis is crucial in reducing disability and preventing the evolution of the problem into a chronic progressive illness. The implications of the present findings were discussed.
Patient outcome in migraine prophylaxis: the role of psychopharmacological agents
Maurizio Pompili,Gianluca Serafini,Marco Innamorati,et al
Patient Related Outcome Measures , 2010,
Abstract: Maurizio Pompili1,2, Gianluca Serafini1, Marco Innamorati1, Giulia Serra1, Giovanni Dominici1, Juliana Fortes-Lindau1, Monica Pastina1, Ludovica Telesforo1, David Lester3, Paolo Girardi1, Roberto Tatarelli1, Paolo Martelletti41Department of Neurosciences, Mental Health and Sensory Functions, Suicide Prevention Center, Sant’Andrea Hospital, Sapienza University of Rome, Italy; 2McLean Hospital – Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA; 3The Richard Stockton College of New Jersey, Pomona, NJ, USA; 4Department of Medical and Molecular Sciences, 2nd School of Medicine, Sant’Andrea Hospital, “Sapienza” University of Rome, Rome, ItalyIntroduction: Migraine is a serious illness that needs correct treatment for acute attacks and, in addition, a treatment prophylaxis, since patients with migraine suffer during acute attacks and also between attacks.Methods: A systematic review of the most relevant clinical trials of migraine headache and its epidemiology, pathophysiology, comorbidity, and prophylactic treatment (medical and nonmedical) was carried out using “Medline” and “PsychINFO” from 1973 to 2009. Approximately 110 trials met our inclusion criteria and were included in the current review.Results: The most effective pharmacological treatment for migraine prophylaxis is propranolol and anticonvulsants such as topiramate, valproic acid, and amitriptyline. Nonmedical treatments such as acupuncture, biofeedback, and melatonin have also been proposed. Peripheral neurostimulation has been suggested for the treatment of chronic daily headache that does not respond to prophylaxis and for the treatment of drug-resistant primary headache. The majority of the pharmacological agents available today have limited efficacy and may cause adverse effects incompatible with long-term use.Limitations: The review was limited by the highly variable and often insufficient reporting of the complex outcome data and by the fact that migraine prophylaxis trials typically use headache diaries to monitor the course of the disease. The results of the different studies were also presented in different ways, making comparison of the results difficult.Discussion: An adequate prophylaxis is crucial in reducing disability and preventing the evolution of the problem into a chronic progressive illness. The implications of the present findings were discussed.Keywords: migraine, prophylaxis, pharmacological agents, nonmedical treatments, outcome
Suicide risk in depression and bipolar disorder: Do impulsiveness-aggressiveness and pharmacotherapy predict suicidal intent?
Maurizio Pompili,Marco Innamorati,Michele Raja,Ilaria Falcone
Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment , 2008,
Abstract: Maurizio Pompili1,2, Marco Innamorati3, Michele Raja4, Ilaria Falcone2, Giuseppe Ducci5, Gloria Angeletti2, David Lester6, Paolo Girardi2, Roberto Tatarelli2, Eleonora De Pisa21McLean Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA; 2Department of Psychiatry, Sant’Andrea Hospital, “Sapienza” University of Rome, Italy; 3Università Europea di Roma, Italy; 4Diagnostic and Therapeutic Psychiatric Services, Department of Mental Health, Santo Spirito Hospital, Rome, Italy; 5Diagnostic and Therapeutic Psychiatric Services, Department of Mental Health, San Filippo Neri Hospital, Rome, Italy; 6Center for the Study of Suicide, Blackwood, NJ, USAAbstract: The aims of the present study were to examine clinical, personality, and sociodemographic predictors of suicide risk in a sample of inpatients affected by major affective disorders. The participants were 74 inpatients affected by major depressive disorder or bipolar disorder-I. Patients completed a semi-structured interview, the Beck Hopelessness Scale, the Aggression Questionnaire, the Barratt Impulsiveness Scale, and the Hamilton scales for depression and anxiety. Over 52% of the patients were high suicide risks. Those at risk reported more severe depressive-anxious symptomatology, more impulsivity and more hostility. Impulsivity, the use of antidepressants, anxiety/somatization, and the use of mood stabilizers (a negative predictor) resulted in accurate predicting of suicide intent. Impulsivity and antidepressant use were the strongest predictors even after controlling for several sociodemographic and clinical variables.Keywords: suicide, mood disorders, pharmacotherapy, impulsiveness, aggressiveness
Atypical Antipsychotics in the Treatment of Depressive and Psychotic Symptoms in Patients with Chronic Schizophrenia: A Naturalistic Study
Marco Innamorati,Stefano Baratta,Cristina Di Vittorio,David Lester
Schizophrenia Research and Treatment , 2013, DOI: 10.1155/2013/423205
Abstract:
Short-Term Psychodynamic Psychotherapy in Patients with “Male Depression” Syndrome, Hopelessness, and Suicide Risk: A Pilot Study
Gloria Angeletti,Maurizio Pompili,Marco Innamorati,Chiara Santucci
Depression Research and Treatment , 2013, DOI: 10.1155/2013/408983
Abstract:
Partial Androgen Deficiency, Depression, and Testosterone Supplementation in Aging Men
Mario Amore,Marco Innamorati,Sara Costi,Leo Sher,Paolo Girardi,Maurizio Pompili
International Journal of Endocrinology , 2012, DOI: 10.1155/2012/280724
Abstract: The aim of this review was to summarize current knowledge on the correlation between depressive symptoms with a syndrome called partial androgen deficiency of the aging male (PADAM) and on the potential benefits of testosterone (T) treatment on mood. Despite, the causative nature of the relationship between low T levels and depression is uncertain, many hypogonadal men suffer from depression and vice versa several depressed patients are affected by hypogonadism. Supplementation with testosterone failed to show sound evidence of effectiveness in the treatment of depression. Nevertheless, testosterone supplementation has proved to be effective on some domains significant for the quality of life of aged patients with PADAM (sexual function and cognitive functions, muscular strengths). 1. Introduction Testosterone deficiency or hypotestosteronemia is a widely recognized hormonal alteration associated with male aging [1–3]. Its prevalence may be as high as 30% in men aged 40–79 years [4, 5], and in up to 12% the hypotestosteronemia it can be associated with clinical symptoms [5]. Nevertheless, different levels of testosterone (T) could be associated with the presence of specific clinical symptoms [6, 7]. The joint consensus of International Society of Andrology, the International Society for the Study of the Aging Male (ISSAM) and the European Association of Urology prepared a set of recommendations specifically on the Investigation, treatment, and monitoring of late-onset hypogonadism in males [8, 9]. Laboratory diagnosis of hypogonadism is based on the measurement of serum total testosterone (TT). Although there is no uniformly accepted threshold level for T in older men, TT levels above 350?ng/dL are considered normal and do not require substitution therapy, while TT levels below 230?ng/dL usually benefit from testosterone treatment. When TT level is between 230 and 350?ng/dL, it may be useful to calculate free testosterone (FT), particularly in obese men. FT level below 65?pg/mL suggests that testosterone treatment is needed [10, 11]. In 2010, the Endocrine Society published clinical practice guidelines for testosterone therapy in adult men with androgen deficiency syndrome [12]. The members of the working group agreed that because the normative ranges for TT and FT in healthy young men vary among laboratories and assays (lower TT limits: 280–300?ng/dL; lower FT limits: 5–9?pg/mL) [13], clinicians should use the lower limit of normal range for healthy young men established in their laboratory. Members of the working group disagreed on T concentrations
Glycosides, Depression and Suicidal Behaviour: The Role of Glycoside-Linked Proteins
Gianluca Serafini,Maurizio Pompili,Marco Innamorati,Gloria Giordano,Roberto Tatarelli,David Lester,Paolo Girardi,Yogesh Dwivedi
Molecules , 2011, DOI: 10.3390/molecules16032688
Abstract: Nowadays depression and suicide are two of the most important worldwide public health problems. Although their specific molecular mechanisms are still largely unknown, glycosides can play a fundamental role in their pathogenesis. These molecules act presumably through the up-regulation of plasticity-related proteins: probably they can have a presynaptic facilitatory effect, through the activation of several intracellular signaling pathways that include molecules like protein kinase A, Rap-1, cAMP, cADPR and G proteins. These proteins take part in a myriad of brain functions such as cell survival and synaptic plasticity. In depressed suicide victims, it has been found that their activity is strongly decreased, primarily in hippocampus and prefrontal cortex. These studies suggest that glycosides can regulate neuroprotection through Rap-1 and other molecules, and may play a crucial role in the pathophysiology of depression and suicide.
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