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Search Results: 1 - 10 of 401489 matches for " Maggie M. Ramzy "
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Genetic polymorphism of GSTM1 and GSTP1 in lung cancer in Egypt
Maggie M. Ramzy,Mohei El-Din M. Solliman,Hany A. Abdel-Hafiz,Randa Salah
International Journal of Collaborative Research on Internal Medicine & Public Health , 2011,
Abstract: Background: Lung cancer (LC) is the most common cause of cancer-related mortality; it is one of the most important common diseases with complicate, multi-factorial etiology, including interactions between genetic makeup and environmental factors. Individuals may differ in their susceptibility to environmental risk factors. This difference of susceptibility may result from inherited polymorphisms in various genes controlling carcinogen metabolism, repair of DNA damage and cell cycle.Objectives: Glutathione S-transferase (GST) plays a key role in detoxification of carcinogens present in tobacco smoke and consequently polymorphisms in this gene may confer susceptibility to many types of cancer such as lung cancer. In the current study the effect of GSTM1 and GSTP1 polymorphism on the development of lung cancer among Egyptian patients was investigated.Methods: The GSTM1 was analyzed using multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) while polymorphism of GSTP1 was analyzed using RFLP. Results: It was found that there is no significant difference (p value = 0.8) in GSTM1 genotype distribution between control and lung cancer cases as it was absent in 33.3% in control and 31.25% in patients. While GSTP1 single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) encoding A313G base change increases the susceptibility for lung cancer especially among smokers as odds ratio was 5 in case of smokers carry ile/val or val/val genotypes. Also, combination of GSTP1 and GSTM1 polymorphism increases the risk for lung cancer. Our data may provide additional information to the understanding of the molecular mechanism and individual susceptibility to lung cancer in Egypt.
Numerical Study of Slip Effect of Unsteady MHD Pulsatile Flow through Porous Medium in an Artery Using Generalized Differential Quadrature Method (Comparative Study)  [PDF]
Islam M. Eldesoky, Mohamed H. Kamel, Ramzy M. Abumandour
World Journal of Engineering and Technology (WJET) , 2014, DOI: 10.4236/wjet.2014.22015
Abstract: The unsteady pulsatile flow of blood through porous medium in an artery has been studied under the influence of periodic body acceleration and slip condition by considering blood as incompressible Newtonian electrically conducting fluid in the presence of magnetic field. In this paper, a new technique of differential quadrature method is introduced to find numerical solution of non-linear partial differential equations such as the equation of motion of this problem “Navier-Stokes equation”. The presence of the nonlinearity in the problem leads to severe difficulties in the solution approximation. In construction of the numerical scheme “a new algorithm” a generalized differential quadrature method (GDQM) is to use for derivatives with respect to space variables of differential equations and for the time derivative applying fourth order RungeKutta Method (RKM). The GDQM changed the nonlinear partial differential equations into a system of nonlinear ordinary differential equations (ODEs). The obtained system of ODEs is solved by 4th order RKM. This combination of DQM and 4th order RKM gives a very good numerical technique for solving time dependent problems. The algorithm is coded in Matlab 7.14.0.739 and the simulations are run on a Pentium 4 CPU 900 MHz with 1 GB memory capacity. The effects of slip condition, magnetic field, porous medium, and body acceleration have been discussed. The numerical results show that the proposed method is more accurate and convergent than other numerical methods in literature. The method is illustrated and compared with the exact and analytical solutions and it is found that the proposed method gives a better accuracy and is quite easy to implement.
Impact of a Clinical Pharmacist in the General Hospital: An Egyptian Trial  [PDF]
Nirmeen A. Sabry, Maggie M. Abbassi
Pharmacology & Pharmacy (PP) , 2014, DOI: 10.4236/pp.2014.56068
Abstract:

Medication review aims at optimizing the impact of medications while minimizing their related problems. Drug-related problems have never been properly addressed in Egyptian hospitals. The purpose of this paper is to record and compare the prevalence and types of medication related problems, the interventions provided by the clinical pharmacists and how physicians responded along with making recommendations for error prevention. This prospective study was conducted between June 2012 and December 2012, at an Egyptian general hospital. Five trained pharmacists recorded patient-specific medication related recommendations and completed quality-of-care interventions. The average number of audited doses was 81% of those prescribed. The most prevalent medication problem was prescribing errors followed by administration errors. A total of 20 patients experienced adverse drug events. The greatest error rates across the seven months were observed in the ICU and cardiology units. Numbers of interventions offered by the pharmacists ranged from 241, to 519 per month. Nurses accepted all the interventions introduced by the pharmacists aimed at reducing administration errors while physicians’ resistance rates had an average of 21%. This study showed a positive influence of the pharmacist-led medication review in reducing potential drug-related problems in an Egyptian secondary care where the hospital under study implemented new measures to minimize drug related problems according to the findings of the trained pharmacists.

Synthesis and in vitro Evaluation of New Benzothiazole Derivatives as Schistosomicidal Agents
Mona A Mahran,Samia William,Fatem Ramzy,Amira M Sembel
Molecules , 2007, DOI: 10.3390/12030622
Abstract: A series of benzothiazol-2-yl-dithiocarbamates 3a-d along with their copper complexes 4a-c were synthesized via the reaction of suitable alkyl, aralkyl or heteroaryl halides with the sodium salt of benzothiazol-2-yl-dithiocarbamic acid, followed by complexation with copper sulphate. N-(4-Acetyl-5-aryl-4,5-dihydro-1,3,4-thiadiazol-2-yl)-N-benzothiazol-2-yl-acetamides 7a-c were synthesized by cyclization of the appropriate thiosemicarbazones 6a-c in acetic anhydride. Selected compounds were screened for in vitro schistosomicidal activity against Schistosoma mansoni at three different dosage levels (10, 50 and 100 μg/ mL). Three of these products, 4a-c, showed schistosomicidal activity similar to praziquantel, with 100% worm mortality at 10 μg/mL. These compounds would constitute a new class of potent schistosomicidal agents.
Purification and characterization of toxic waste in the aquatic environment using common carp, Cyprinus carpio
Hanan Abd Al-Gawad,Enas M. Ramzy
Journal of Natural Resources and Development , 2013, DOI: 10.5027/jnrd.v3i0.03
Abstract: The organophosphorus (OP) pesticide (malathion) is used heavily for many crops such as vegetable and cotton to control serious key insecticide in many areas of Egypt. This study has focused on the effect of malathion on aquatic environment and aquatic organisms. The experimental work was carried out using malathion at different dosage of water lasted 96h and was carried out undertaken laboratory conditions. It evaluated the sensitivity of organic toxic waste and their purification techniques for common carp, Cyprinus carpio by determining enzymes activity as biomarker indicators in various organs of the studied fish.The results showed that exposure to malathion caused a significant increase in enzyme activity and total protein contents in the investigated tissues and inhibition of brain and liver acetylcholinesterase (AChE). Moreover, among the tissues studied, it appeared that the brain, gills and liver were more sensitive to pollution and seemed to be the most appropriate tissues to monitor water pollution by OP pesticides. In this context for environmental biomonitoring, the evaluation of toxic waste purification can be done to assess sensitivity of aquatic organism in recycling water to meet national goals and environmental safety.
Cardiac crossroads: deciding between mechanical or bioprosthetic heart valve replacement
Maggie N Tillquist, Thomas M Maddox
Patient Preference and Adherence , 2011, DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/PPA.S16420
Abstract: rdiac crossroads: deciding between mechanical or bioprosthetic heart valve replacement Review (4723) Total Article Views Authors: Maggie N Tillquist, Thomas M Maddox Published Date February 2011 Volume 2011:5 Pages 91 - 99 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/PPA.S16420 Maggie N Tillquist1, Thomas M Maddox2 1School of Medicine, University of Colorado Denver, Denver, CO, USA; 2VA Eastern Colorado Health Care System, and Department of Medicine (Cardiology), University of Colorado Denver, Denver, CO, USA Abstract: Nearly 15 million people in the United States suffer from either aortic or mitral valvular disease. For patients with severe and symptomatic valvular heart disease, valve replacement surgery improves morbidity and mortality outcomes. In 2009, 90,000 valve replacement surgeries were performed in the United States. This review evaluates the advantages and disadvantages of mechanical and bioprosthetic prosthetic heart valves as well as the factors for consideration in deciding the appropriate valve type for an individual patient. Although many caveats exist, the general recommendation is for patients younger than 60 to 65 years to receive mechanical valves due to the valve's longer durability and for patients older than 60 to 65 years to receive a bioprosthetic valve to avoid complications with anticoagulants. Situations that warrant special consideration include patient co-morbidities, the need for anticoagulation, and the potential for pregnancy. Once these characteristics have been considered, patients' values, anxieties, and expectations for their lifestyle and quality of life should be incorporated into final valve selection. Decision aids can be useful in integrating preferences in the valve decision. Finally, future directions in valve technology, anticoagulation, and medical decision-making are discussed.
Cardiac crossroads: deciding between mechanical or bioprosthetic heart valve replacement
Maggie N Tillquist,Thomas M Maddox
Patient Preference and Adherence , 2011,
Abstract: Maggie N Tillquist1, Thomas M Maddox21School of Medicine, University of Colorado Denver, Denver, CO, USA; 2VA Eastern Colorado Health Care System, and Department of Medicine (Cardiology), University of Colorado Denver, Denver, CO, USAAbstract: Nearly 15 million people in the United States suffer from either aortic or mitral valvular disease. For patients with severe and symptomatic valvular heart disease, valve replacement surgery improves morbidity and mortality outcomes. In 2009, 90,000 valve replacement surgeries were performed in the United States. This review evaluates the advantages and disadvantages of mechanical and bioprosthetic prosthetic heart valves as well as the factors for consideration in deciding the appropriate valve type for an individual patient. Although many caveats exist, the general recommendation is for patients younger than 60 to 65 years to receive mechanical valves due to the valve's longer durability and for patients older than 60 to 65 years to receive a bioprosthetic valve to avoid complications with anticoagulants. Situations that warrant special consideration include patient co-morbidities, the need for anticoagulation, and the potential for pregnancy. Once these characteristics have been considered, patients' values, anxieties, and expectations for their lifestyle and quality of life should be incorporated into final valve selection. Decision aids can be useful in integrating preferences in the valve decision. Finally, future directions in valve technology, anticoagulation, and medical decision-making are discussed.Keywords: prosthetic heart valves, patient preference, valve type, anticoagulant, structural valve deterioration
Molecular Analysis for Nitrogenous Fertilizers Effect on Drosophila melanogaster Boule Gene
Emtithal M. Abd-El-Samie,Hoda B. Faheem,Mary T. Ibrahim,Adel Ramzy
Biotechnology , 2007,
Abstract: Drosophila melanogaster is a widely used model organism for genetic dissection of developmental processes. It is an ideal multicellular organism for the rapid toxicological screening of substances for mutagenicity. Boule gene was shown to be a key regulator of meiosis in Drosophila. Boule-deficient fruit flies are infertile and display meiotic arrest in the male germ cells. Investigation of the impact of some nitrogenous fertilizers on the expression of Drosophila boule gene had been performed. Newly hatched larvae were treated with the LC25 and LC50 of the three tested nitrogenous fertilizers Urea, Ammonium nitrate and Calcium nitrate. The study includes the isolation and molecular characterization of the Drosophila boule gene homolog to the human DAZ gene. Total RNA have been isolated from untreated and treated D. melanogaster adult male flies. Fragments of the boule gene were recovered with RT-PCR for sequencing. Treated and untreated Drosophila melanogaster boule gene express the same pattern of transcripts. The sequence of the boule fragments of the treated adult males with the LC25 and LC50 of the three tested nitrogenous fertilizers showed different types of mutations such as substitution, deletion and insertion mutations. These results indicate that the three nitrogenous fertilizers used posses mutagenic potentialities. The mutagenic activity is due to their Nitrogen (N) content. Another possible interpretation for the mutagenicity of the tested compounds is the ability of nitrogenous fertilizers to methylate DNA resulting in different types of genetic alterations. Analysis of these mutations should provide insight into the genetic networks that control male fertility in Drosophila and other organisms, including humans.
Nutritional regulation of genome-wide association obesity genes in a tissue-dependent manner
Piriya Yoganathan, Subashini Karunakaran, Maggie M Ho, Susanne M Clee
Nutrition & Metabolism , 2012, DOI: 10.1186/1743-7075-9-65
Abstract: We examined the expression of 19 GWAS obesity genes in the brain and specifically the hypothalamus, adipose tissue and liver of mice by real-time quantitative PCR. To determine whether these genes are nutritionally regulated, as may be expected for genes affecting obesity, we compared tissues from fasting and non-fasting animals and tissues from mice consuming a high fat high sucrose diet in comparison to standard rodent chow.We found complex, tissue-dependent patterns of nutritional regulation of most of these genes. For example, Bat2 expression was increased ~10-fold in the brain of fed mice but was lower or unchanged in the hypothalamus and adipose tissue. Kctd15 expression was upregulated in the hypothalamus, brain and adipose tissue of fed mice and downregulated by high fat feeding in liver, adipose tissue and the hypothalamus but not the remainder of the brain. Sh2b1 expression in the brain and Faim2 expression in adipose tissue were specifically increased >20-fold in fed mice. Tmem18 expression in adipose tissue but not the brain was reduced 80% by high fat feeding. Few changes in the expression of these genes were observed in liver.These data show nutritional regulation of nearly all these GWAS obesity genes, particularly in the brain and adipose tissue, and provide support for their role in the development of obesity. The complex patterns of nutritional and tissue-dependent regulation also highlight the difficulty that may be encountered in determining how the GWAS genetic variants affect gene expression and consequent obesity risk in humans where access to tissues is constrained.
Childhood Poisoning Cases Admitted to Zagazig University Hospitals during the Year 2018: A Retrospective Study  [PDF]
Abeer Ramzy Hussieny Mahmoud
Occupational Diseases and Environmental Medicine (ODEM) , 2019, DOI: 10.4236/odem.2019.74009
Abstract: Background: Childhood poisoning is considered major socioeconomic and public health problem as there are thousands of children admitted to the emergency departments and millions of calls are made to poison control centers every year. Aim of the Work: Determine the prevalence and pattern of childhood poisoning cases admitted to Zagazig University hospitals. Subjects and Methods: This is a retrospective study on children < 18 years old presented to Zagazig University hospital emergency department. The study was done from the beginning of January 2018 to the end of December 2018 on total of 624 cases with acute poisoning. All required epidemiological and clinical data were collected and analyzed. Results: A total of 624 childhood poisoning cases, more males than females (55.3% versus 44.7% respectively), and more in age group of 3 - 6 years old (40.86%), more in rural than urban communities (65.06% against 34.94% respectively). Oral exposure was the most against other routes (84.94%). Most cases were unintentional (92.8%). The prevalence of childhood poisoning in descending order was; compound therapeutic medications (32.69%) followed by pesticides (26.92%) then corrosives (17.31%), while volatile hydrocarbons (benzene or kerosene) accounted for (15.38%) and carbon monoxide (3.85%) and others (3.85%). Overall, minor cases were the commonest (63%) while only 3.8% of cases were severe. About 88.94% of cases were discharged after completed management while death rate was 0.96%. Conclusion: Most childhood poisoning cases were males, accidentally, mainly by oral route and in rural areas, most commonly in age group of 3 - 6 years. Most cases were due to therapeutic medications then pesticide exposures. Most of cases were completely cured.
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