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Search Results: 1 - 10 of 490660 matches for " M.F. Alam "
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Clonal Propagation of Averrhoa carambola Linn. Through Nodal Culture of Mature Tree
M. Khalekuzzaman,M.F. Alam,M. Nuruzzaman
Journal of Biological Sciences , 2003,
Abstract: Averrhoa carambola Linn. was micropropagated from nodal explants through axillary branching on MS medium supplemented with benzyladenine (BA) and Kinetin, Maximum numbers of shoots per explant were obtained on MS medium supplemented with 1.0 mg L-1 each of BA and Kinetin. Subculturing of regenerated shoots in MS medium having low concentration of BA (0.1 mg L-1) stimulates shoot elongation. Regenerated shoots were rooted by treating them with auxins and best root induction (70%) was observed in half-strength MS medium supplemented with 0.5 mg L-1 indole-3-butyic acid (lBA). Rooted plantlets were successfully established in soil.
Effect of Gamma Irradiation on the Callus, Developed from Indica Rice
M.F. Hossain,M.S. Alam
Pakistan Journal of Biological Sciences , 2001,
Abstract: Induced mutation holds promise for effective improvement and have high potential for bringing about genetic variability. Regenerable calli of four rice varieties were exposed to 0 to 6 Gy of gamma rays to determine their effect on growth and plant regeneration capability. Both growth and regeneration capacity decreased with increasing levels of gamma rays ; however, plant regeneration capacity was more sensitive to gamma rays than growth. The 50% inhibition dose for callus growth and plant regeneration was approximately 5.0 Gy of gamma radiation in Binnatoa variety. But in remaining varieties 4.0 Gy was recorded for callus growth and 2.0 Gy for regeneration.
Influence of Different Sowing Dates on the Phenology and Accumulated Heat Units in Wheat
S.A. Haider,M.Z. Alam,M.F. Alam,N.K. Paul
Journal of Biological Sciences , 2003,
Abstract: A field investigation was carried out to study the influence of sowing dates on phenology and accumulated heat units of four cultivars of bread wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) at different phenological stages over two growing seasons. There were two sowing dates: early and late. The late sown plants had significantly shorter phenological stages and lower growing day degree than the early sown plants in all the four cultivars. Cultivars Akbar was found to be early and C 306 was found to be late maturing. Akbar had the lowest and C 306 had the highest growing degree days during all the phenological stages under each irrigation regimes. Heliothermal units also showed more or less the same trends. The phenothermal indices and heat use efficiency were found to be higher in the early sown plants than the late sown plants.
Evaluation of Nutrient Film Technique and Sand Culture for Year-round Production of Tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.) in Tropical Asia
M.G. Ahmed,M.F. Alam,M. Nuruzzaman,A.M. Shohael
Asian Journal of Plant Sciences , 2003,
Abstract: Nutrient film technique and sand culture were tested for the year round production of tomato in Bangladesh. Two cultivars of tomato viz., Egg tomato and Kingkong were tested for growth in both winter (November 2000-February 2001) and summer (May 2001-August 2001) seasons in NFT (Nutrients Film Technique) and sand culture. Sand culture was more simple to establish and manage incurved lowed cost compared to NFT system, however higher production was observed in NFT system. Egg tomato was found to be suitable for growth in summer, where as winter was suitable for Kingkong tested NFT and sand culture.
Environmental Effect on Growth and Yield of Tomato
M.F. Hasan,B. Ahmed,M.A. Rahman,M.M. Alam
Journal of Biological Sciences , 2005,
Abstract: The study was conducted to analyze the responses of two tomato varieties, BARI tomato-4 and BARI tomato-6 to different environments. The environment used in the experiment were no mulch or control (E0), straw mulch (E1), black polythene mulch (E2), water hyacinth mulch (E3) and am-ada leaf mulch (E4). There were significant influences of different mulches on the growth and yield of tomato. The height of plant, number of leaves, number of main roots, length of roots, fresh and dry weight of roots, number of flower and fruit clusters, number of fruits per plant, weight of fruits and fruit yield per hectare were significantly higher under the environment provided by black polythene mulch. There were also variations in yield contributing characters between the varieties. BARI tomato-6 produced higher yield (55.16 t ha 1) than BARI tomato-4 (51.8 t ha 1). Among the variety-environment combinations the highest yield (61.18 t ha 1) was produced by BARI tomato-6 under the environment of black polythene mulch. This combination also gave the best economic return (BCR = 4.52).
Virus Free Potato Tuber Seed Production Through Meristem Culture In Tropical Asia
Ahsan Nagib,S.A. Hossain,M.F. Alam,M.M. Hossain
Asian Journal of Plant Sciences , 2003,
Abstract: In order to produce virus free potato tuber seeds in vitro culture was established using apical meristem of four widely cultivated varieties of Bangladesh namely Diamant, Cardinal, Multa and Lalpakri. Meristem of these varieties of potato were cultured for shoot proliferation and root induction in MS and MS0 medium supplemented with different types and concentration of phytohormones. Among the different growth regulator formulations, 0.5 mg l-1 GA3+0.04 mg l-1 KIN was found to be the best medium for the primary establishment of meristem. The primary established meristems were subcultured on to MSo medium and MS medium containing BA and IBA singly or in combinations. Considering all the treatments singly use of IBA (0.5 mg l-1 ) is recommended for proper shoot and root development from primary meristem. After DAS-ELISSA test the virus free in vitro grown potato plantlets were using for massive micro propagation. GA3 and KIN singly or in combinations are used for shoot and root multiplication, among all these combinations 2.0 mg l-1 GA3 was found to be the best media for shoot induction for the studied varities. For high frequency of root formation, combination of GA3 (0.1 mg l-1 )+KIN (0.1 mg l-1 ) was most effective. Rooted plantlet were gradually acclimatized and successfully established in the field. Visual evolution of the morphological trials of the tissue culture derived plants showed all plants were found normal and free from virus diseases. Substantial yield increase was observed in meristem derived plants over their source plants.
Leaching of a gold bearing partially roasted sulphide. Laboratory scale studies
Almeida, M.F.;
Materials Research , 2001, DOI: 10.1590/S1516-14392001000400014
Abstract: this research aimed at defining a route for recovering precious metals from a very heterogeneous gold bearing sulphide and arsenide concentrate that was partially roasted and dumped by the 1960s when santo antónio mine closed. gold occurs in this concentrate as free particles in the range of 10-100 mm, most of them still enclosed in the pyrite and arsenopyrite matrix. its content varies from 20 to 150 g of au/ton, being higher at the dump upper levels and in the finer concentrate fractions. preliminary tests demonstrated the refractoriness of this product, since the leaching with conventional cyanide solutions and with other leaching solutions gave very low recoveries. however, high concentrated cyanide solutions recover more than 60% of au, although with high nacn and lime consumptions and poor settling characteristics. iron was shown to be highly dissolved in these solutions. some prior treatments clearly favoured the cyanidation process, in particular a roasting step. thus, a large number of roasting experiments was carried out to define the most favourable conditions for recovering gold. however, no clear relationship between roasting conditions and gold dissolution was found due to the heterogeneity of the product and high variance of gold experimental recoveries. these recoveries were calculated considering gold contained in both the leaching residues and leachates, and uncertainties of these results are relatively high. roasting the product at 450-700 °c for 1 h guarantees a high probability to dissolve at least 74% au in a highly concentrated nacn solution stirred for 24 h. the 600-700 °c roasting range is clearly preferable for consuming less cyanide and lime. pre-washing the roasted product seems not to reduce the cyanide consumption. regarding the silver recovery, the nacn and lime consumption are higher while using the products roasted at the lowest tested temperatures. products roasted at higher temperatures have better settling performance.
Challenges in using fish communities for assessing the ecological integrity of non-perennial rivers
M.F Avenant
Water SA , 2010,
Abstract: Environmental Water Assessments (EWAs) aim to protect the ecological integrity of rivers amidst increasing anthropogenic pressures on freshwater resources, and fish communities are the ecosystem component most commonly included. The Fish Response Assessment Index (FRAI) was developed to assess the integrity of fish communities in South African rivers and is commonly applied in EWA studies. This paper reports on the suitability of the FRAI for the non-perennial Seekoei River and discusses some of the challenges faced. Our relatively long and thorough study on the Seekoei River confirmed the concerns that earlier, snapshot, fish integrity assessments in the Orange River system raised: that the existing fish indices are not ideally suited for these rivers with their naturally low species richness and hardy, generalist fish communities. Other difficulties with the use of a score-based method include prediction of the expected species, calculation of a frequency of occurrence rating, selection of the right sampling times for comparative purposes, loss of habitats and sampling points under different flow conditions, and problems experienced when using accumulated data to try to correct for a situation of having too few sampling points. At this stage a more generalised approach is suggested for the Seekoei River, and ultimately other similar non-perennial systems. This could include a number of community characteristics, such as abundance, species richness, species diversity and evenness, recruitment, fish health and the presence/absence of exotic species.
A provisional check list of the reptiles and amphibians of Golden Gate Highlands National Park
M.F. Bates
Koedoe : African Protected Area Conservation and Science , 1991, DOI: 10.4102/koedoe.v34i2.431
Abstract: A provisional check list of 26 reptile and amphibian species (8 frog, 8 lizard and 10 snake species) occurring in Golden Gate Highlands National Park is presented. The list does not reflect the results of an intensive survey, but is a record of specimens collected in the park and preserved at the National Museum, Bloemfontein.
Moraliteit, die opdringerige en die voorwaardelike
M.F. Heyns
Koers : Bulletin for Christian Scholarship , 2010, DOI: 10.4102/koers.v75i1.80
Abstract: Morality, the obtrusive and the conditional The secularist (immanentist), historicist and pluralistic nature of current thinking disables the articulation of transcendental conditions for morality. It is ostensibly especially the constancy of a structure for morality, as transcendental condition, for morality that is disputable. However, an aggressive immanentism sees to it that a transcendent origin for morality does not even appear on the agenda of late modern thinkers, which makes the latter probably an equally serious marginalisation of transcendental considerations. In this article the (sometimes unconscious) experience of some philosophers that a constant structure for morality obtrudes itself upon us, is highlighted. A further claim is that a similar obtrusion can be observed about a coherent diversity of moral sources (i.e. sources which find themselves in a transcendental position with regard to each other). The “most daring” argument is for a transcendental transcendent origin for morality.
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