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Search Results: 1 - 10 of 405069 matches for " M. Wong "
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Confidence Intervals for the Mean of Non-Normal Distribution: Transform or Not to Transform  [PDF]
Jolynn Pek, Augustine C. M. Wong, Octavia C. Y. Wong
Open Journal of Statistics (OJS) , 2017, DOI: 10.4236/ojs.2017.73029
Abstract: In many areas of applied statistics, confidence intervals for the mean of the population are of interest. Confidence intervals are typically constructed as-suming normality although non-normally distributed data are a common occurrence in practice. Given a large enough sample size, confidence intervals for the mean can be constructed by applying the Central Limit Theorem or by the bootstrap method. Another commonly used method in practice is the back-transformation method, which takes on the following three steps. First, apply a transformation to the data such that the transformed data are normally distributed. Second, obtain confidence intervals for the transformed mean in the usual manner, which assumes normality. Third, apply the back- transformation to obtain confidence intervals for the mean of the original, non-transformed distribution. The parametric Wald method and a small sample likelihood-based third order method, which can address non-normality, are also reviewed in this paper. Our simulation results suggest that common approaches such as back-transformation give erroneous and misleading results even when the sample size is large. However, the likelihood-based third order method gives extremely accurate results even when the sample size is small.
Secret Sharing LDPC Codes for the BPSK-constrained Gaussian Wiretap Channel
Chan Wong Wong,Tan F. Wong,John M. Shea
Mathematics , 2010,
Abstract: The problem of secret sharing over the Gaussian wiretap channel is considered. A source and a destination intend to share secret information over a Gaussian channel in the presence of a wiretapper who observes the transmission through another Gaussian channel. Two constraints are imposed on the source-to-destination channel; namely, the source can transmit only binary phase shift keyed (BPSK) symbols, and symbol-by-symbol hard-decision quantization is applied to the received symbols of the destination. An error-free public channel is also available for the source and destination to exchange messages in order to help the secret sharing process. The wiretapper can perfectly observe all messages in the public channel. It is shown that a secret sharing scheme that employs a random ensemble of regular low density parity check (LDPC) codes can achieve the key capacity of the BPSK-constrained Gaussian wiretap channel asymptotically with increasing block length. To accommodate practical constraints of finite block length and limited decoding complexity, fixed irregular LDPC codes are also designed to replace the regular LDPC code ensemble in the proposed secret sharing scheme.
LDPC Code Design for the BPSK-constrained Gaussian Wiretap Channel
Chan Wong Wong,Tan F. Wong,John M. Shea
Mathematics , 2011,
Abstract: A coding scheme based on irregular low-density parity-check (LDPC) codes is proposed to send secret messages from a source over the Gaussian wiretap channel to a destination in the presence of a wiretapper, with the restriction that the source can send only binary phase-shift keyed (BPSK) symbols. The secrecy performance of the proposed coding scheme is measured by the secret message rate through the wiretap channel as well as the equivocation rate about the message at the wiretapper. A code search procedure is suggested to obtain irregular LDPC codes that achieve good secrecy performance in such context.
Editorial
Wong-Riley M
Eye and Brain , 2011, DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/EB.S19915
Abstract: Editorial Editorial (2648) Total Article Views Authors: Wong-Riley M Published Date April 2011 Volume 2011:3 Pages 17 - 18 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/EB.S19915 Margaret Wong-Riley Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI, USA There is no doubt that we have long entered into an information explosion age, and the pace is escalating by the minute. Not only have the borders between disciplines been torn down, but there are no longer any barriers between counties, states, regions, countries, and continents. Knowledge is no longer reserved for a privileged few, but indeed can be shared by all. This freedom of information is what we cherish as scientists, but this information is much more valuable when screened first by experts before dissemination. Post to: Cannotea Citeulike Del.icio.us Facebook LinkedIn Twitter Other articles by Professor Margaret Wong-Riley Energy metabolism of the visual system Readers of this article also read: Role of aliskiren in cardio-renal protection and use in hypertensives with multiple risk factors Scanning training in neurological vision loss: case studies Energy metabolism of the visual system Amino acid-responsive Crohn's disease: a case study Lyme disease: the next decade Mitochondrial disorders and the eye Breaking barriers: insight into the pathogenesis of neovascular age-related macular degeneration Low-level light therapy of the eye and brain Neural mechanisms underlying neurooptometric rehabilitation following traumatic brain injury Primary headache disorders and neuro-ophthalmologic manifestations
A Novelty Detection Technique fo Machine Condition Monitoring USing S.O.M
M. L. Dennis Wong
Jurnal Kejuruteraan , 2008,
Abstract: This paper presents a novelty detection based method for machine condition monitoring (MCM) using Kohonen's self-organising map (S.O.M.). As the fault data set is difficult to acquire in MCM problems, the methods requires only the knowledge of normal condition data set. By exploiting S.O.M.'s ability of multi-dimensional mapping, the Euclidean distance between the S.O.M and the data under test is used to discriminate anomaly from normal condition. A set of real world condition monitoring data is used to evaluate the method presented. Experimental result shows high accuracy and reliability of this method
Profile of ezogabine (retigabine) and its potential as an adjunctive treatment for patients with partial-onset seizures
Weisenberg JLZ,Wong M
Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment , 2011,
Abstract: Judith LZ Weisenberg, Michael WongDepartment of Neurology, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, MO, USAAbstract: Epilepsy is a common disease with significant morbidity and mortality. Approximately one-third of patients with epilepsy are refractory to available seizure medications, emphasizing the need to develop better drugs with novel mechanisms of action. Ezogabine, also known as retigabine, is a new potential adjunctive treatment for adults with intractable partial seizures. Ezogabine has a unique mechanism of action consisting of activating KCNQ2/3 (Kv7) potassium channels. Ezogabine has undergone a number of Phase II and III trials demonstrating efficacy at 600,900 and 1200 mg/day in a dose-dependent fashion. The most common adverse events with ezogabine are central nervous system effects, particularly dizziness and somnolence. Urologic symptoms, particularly urinary retention, represent a rare but unique side effect of ezogabine. Ezogabine is predominantly metabolized via glucuronidation. Its half-life is 8 hours, suggesting a need for three-times-a-day administration. Ezogabine exhibits minimal interactions with other seizure medications, except possibly lamotrigine. Ezogabine has potential for clinical applications in other medical conditions beyond epilepsy, such as neuropathic pain, neuromyotonia, and bipolar disease, but these are based primarily on experimental models.Keywords: antiepileptic drug, epilepsy, ezogabine
Editorial
Wong-Riley M
Eye and Brain , 2011,
Abstract: Margaret Wong-RileyMedical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI, USAThere is no doubt that we have long entered into an information explosion age, and the pace is escalating by the minute. Not only have the borders between disciplines been torn down, but there are no longer any barriers between counties, states, regions, countries, and continents. Knowledge is no longer reserved for a privileged few, but indeed can be shared by all. This freedom of information is what we cherish as scientists, but this information is much more valuable when screened first by experts before dissemination.
Thermal and chemical equilibration in a gluon plasma
S. M. H. Wong
Physics , 1996, DOI: 10.1016/0375-9474(96)00220-5
Abstract: We show the evolution of a gluon plasma towards equilibrium starting at some early moment when the momentum distribution in the central region is momentaneously isotropic. Using HIJING results for Au+Au collision as initial input, we consider thermalization and chemical equilibration simultaneously at both LHC and RHIC energies. Thermalization is shown to be driven chiefly by inelastic process in our scenario contradicting common assumption that this is the role of elastic process. We argue that only the inelastic dominancy depends on the initial conditions but not the dominance itself.
Equilibration in Heavy Ion Collisions at LHC and at RHIC
S. M. H. Wong
Physics , 1997,
Abstract: We consider the evolution of a parton plasma created in Au+Au collisions at LHC and at RHIC energies. Using Boltzmann equation, relaxation time approximation and perturbative QCD, we show the physics of both thermal and chemical equilibration in a transparent manner. In particular, we show inelastic processes are, contrary to common assumption, more important than elastic processes, the state of equilibration of the system can compensate for some powers of $\a_s$ for the purpose of equilibration, the two-stage equilibration scenario is, barring any unknown non-perturbative effects, inevitable and is an intrinsic feature of perturbative QCD, and gluon multiplication is the leading process for entropy generation.
Noncovalent Interactions in Supramolecular Complexes: A Study on Corannulene and the Double Concave Buckycatcher
Bryan M. Wong
Physics , 2010, DOI: 10.1002/jcc.21022
Abstract: Stimulated by the recent observation of {\pi}-{\pi} interactions between C60 and corannulene subunits in a molecular tweezer arrangement (J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2007, 129, 3842), a density functional theory study was performed to analyze the electronic structure and properties of various noncovalent corannulene complexes. The theoretical approach is first applied to corannulene complexes with a series of benchmark molecules (CH4, NH3, and H2O) using several new-generation density functionals. The performance of nine density functionals, illustrated by computing binding energies of the corannulene complexes, demonstrates that Zhao and Truhlar's MPWB1K and M05-2X functionals provide energies similar to that obtained at the SCS-MP2 level. In contrast, most of the other popular density functionals fail to describe this noncovalent interaction or yield purely repulsive interactions. Further investigations with the M05-2X functional show that the binding energy of C60 with corannulene subunits in the relaxed molecular receptor clip geometry is -20.67 kcal/mol. The results of this calculation further support the experimental interpretation of pure {\pi}-{\pi} interactions between a convex fullerene and the concave surfaces of two corannulene subunits.
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