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Search Results: 1 - 10 of 401447 matches for " M. Marti "
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Josep Cuatrecasas i Arumí: notes per a una biografia
Montserrat i Marti, Josep M.
Collectanea Botanica , 1997,
Abstract:
Numerical hydrodynamics in special relativity
Jose M. Marti,Ewald Mueller
Physics , 1999,
Abstract: This review is concerned with a discussion of numerical methods for the solution of the equations of special relativistic hydrodynamics (SRHD). Particular emphasis is put on a comprehensive review of the application of high-resolution shock-capturing methods in SRHD. Results obtained with different numerical SRHD methods are compared, and two astrophysical applications of SRHD flows are discussed. An evaluation of the various numerical methods is given and future developments are analyzed.
Translesion DNA synthesis in the context of cancer research
Philip A Knobel, Thomas M Marti
Cancer Cell International , 2011, DOI: 10.1186/1475-2867-11-39
Abstract: We focus on the involvement of mammalian TLS polymerases in DNA damage tolerance mechanisms. In detail, we review the discovery of TLS polymerases and describe the molecular features of all the mammalian TLS polymerases identified so far. We give a short overview of the mechanisms that regulate the selectivity and activity of TLS polymerases. In addition, we summarize the current knowledge how different types of DNA damage, relevant either for the induction or treatment of cancer, are bypassed by TLS polymerases. Finally, we elucidate the relevance of TLS polymerases in the context of cancer therapy.Genomic information is stored as deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) in every living organism and needs to be protected and maintained to guarantee genomic integrity. Each of the 1013 cells of the human body contains 30'000-40'000 genes encoded by 3 × 109 base pairs of the DNA [1-3]. The integrity of the DNA is constantly threatened either by spontaneous decay or by damage induced by endogenous and environmental sources. In every single cell, tens of thousands of DNA lesions per day are formed due to spontaneous hydrolysis and the attack of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and other intracellular metabolites [4]. In the context of cancer research, prominent examples for environmental factors which induce DNA damage are ultraviolet (UV)-light inducing [6-4]pyrimidine-pyrimidone photoproducts ([6-4]PP) and cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPDs), and cigarette smoke, which contains a variety of carcinogens, e.g. benzo(α)pyrene (BaP) [5]. Cancer treatment regimens are frequently based on DNA damage inducing agents. For instance, multimodality therapies of solid tumors are often based on cisplatin, a platinum analogue, which induces intra- and interstrand DNA crosslinks [6].In addition, accurate DNA duplication is an essential step carried out by a complex DNA replication machinery but errors during this process can also compromise genomic integrity. For example, damaged DNA, which cannot
Identifying the genetic components underlying the pathophysiology of movement disorders
Ezquerra M, Compta Y, Marti MJ
The Application of Clinical Genetics , 2011, DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/TACG.S7333
Abstract: entifying the genetic components underlying the pathophysiology of movement disorders Review (12432) Total Article Views Authors: Ezquerra M, Compta Y, Marti MJ Published Date June 2011 Volume 2011:4 Pages 81 - 92 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/TACG.S7333 Mario Ezquerra, Yaroslau Compta, Maria J Marti Parkinson’s Disease and Movement Disorders Unit, Service of Neurology, Institute of Clinical Neurosciences, Hospital Clinic of Barcelona, IDIBAPS, CIBERNED, Spain Abstract: Movement disorders are a heterogeneous group of neurological conditions, few of which have been classically described as bona fide hereditary illnesses (Huntington’s chorea, for instance). Most are considered to be either sporadic or to feature varying degrees of familial aggregation (parkinsonism and dystonia). In the late twentieth century, Mendelian monogenic mutations were found for movement disorders with a clear and consistent family history. Although important, these findings apply only to very rare forms of movement disorders. Already in the twenty-first century, and taking advantage of the modern developments in genetics and molecular biology, growing attention is being paid to the complex genetics of movement disorders. The search for risk genetic variants (polymorphisms) in large cohorts and the identification of different risk variants across different populations and ethnic groups are under way, with the most relevant findings to date corresponding to recent genome wide association studies in Parkinson’s disease. These new approaches focusing on risk variants may enable the design of screening tests for early or even preclinical disease, and the identification of likely therapeutic targets.
Identifying the genetic components underlying the pathophysiology of movement disorders
Ezquerra M,Compta Y,Marti MJ
The Application of Clinical Genetics , 2011,
Abstract: Mario Ezquerra, Yaroslau Compta, Maria J MartiParkinson’s Disease and Movement Disorders Unit, Service of Neurology, Institute of Clinical Neurosciences, Hospital Clinic of Barcelona, IDIBAPS, CIBERNED, SpainAbstract: Movement disorders are a heterogeneous group of neurological conditions, few of which have been classically described as bona fide hereditary illnesses (Huntington’s chorea, for instance). Most are considered to be either sporadic or to feature varying degrees of familial aggregation (parkinsonism and dystonia). In the late twentieth century, Mendelian monogenic mutations were found for movement disorders with a clear and consistent family history. Although important, these findings apply only to very rare forms of movement disorders. Already in the twenty-first century, and taking advantage of the modern developments in genetics and molecular biology, growing attention is being paid to the complex genetics of movement disorders. The search for risk genetic variants (polymorphisms) in large cohorts and the identification of different risk variants across different populations and ethnic groups are under way, with the most relevant findings to date corresponding to recent genome wide association studies in Parkinson’s disease. These new approaches focusing on risk variants may enable the design of screening tests for early or even preclinical disease, and the identification of likely therapeutic targets.Keywords: genetics, movement disorders, Parkinson’s disease, parkinsonism, dystonia
Quantum cavitation in liquid $^3$He: dissipation effects
Dora M. Jezek,Marti Pi,Manuel Barranco
Physics , 1999, DOI: 10.1103/PhysRevB.60.3048
Abstract: We have investigated the effect that dissipation may have on the cavitation process in normal liquid $^3$He. Our results indicate that a rather small dissipation decreases sizeably the quantum-to-thermal crossover temperature $T^*$ for cavitation in normal liquid $^3$He. This is a possible explanation why recent experiments have not yet found clear evidence of quantum cavitation at temperatures below the $T^*$ predicted by calculations which neglect dissipation.
Limit to the radio emission from a putative central compact source in SN1993J
I. Marti-Vidal,J. M. Marcaide
Physics , 2013, DOI: 10.1051/0004-6361/201322138
Abstract: SN1993J in M81 is the best studied young radio-luminous supernova in the Northern Hemisphere. We recently reported results from the analysis of a complete set of VLBI observations of this supernova at 1.7, 2.3, 5.0, and 8.4 GHz, covering a time baseline of more than one decade. Those reported results were focused on the kinematics of the expanding shock, the particulars of its evolving non-thermal emission, the density profile of the circumstellar medium, and the evolving free-free opacity by the supernova ejecta. In the present paper, we complete our analysis by performing a search for any possible signal from a compact source (i.e., a stellar-mass black hole or a young pulsar nebula) at the center of the expanding shell. We have performed a stacking of all our VLBI images at each frequency, after subtraction of our best-fit shell model at each epoch, and measured the peak intensity in the stacked residual image. Given the large amount of available global VLBI observations, the stacking of all the residual images allows us to put upper limits to the eventual emission of a putative compact central source at the level of $\sim102$ $\mu$Jy at 5 GHz (or, more conservatively, $\sim192$ $\mu$Jy, if we make a further correction for the ejecta opacity) and somewhat larger at other wavelengths.
Joint Rock Coefficient Estimation Based on Hausdorff Dimension  [PDF]
Dalibor Marti?ek
Advances in Pure Mathematics (APM) , 2017, DOI: 10.4236/apm.2017.711037
Abstract: The strength of rock structures strongly depends inter alia on surface irregularities of rock joints. These irregularities are characterized by a coefficient of joint roughness. For its estimation, visual comparison is often used. This is rather a subjective method, therefore, fully computerized image recognition procedures were proposed. However, many of them contain imperfections, some of them even mathematical nonsenses and their application can be very dangerous in technical practice. In this paper, we recommend mathematically correct method of fully automatic estimation of the joint roughness coefficient. This method requires only the Barton profiles as a standard.
Discovery of a High-Energy Gamma-Ray-Emitting Persistent Microquasar
J. M. Paredes,J. Marti,M. Ribo,M. Massi
Physics , 2001, DOI: 10.1126/science.288.5475.2340
Abstract: Microquasars are stellar x-ray binaries that behave as a scaled down version of extragalactic quasars. The star LS 5039 is a new microquasar system with apparent persistent ejection of relativistic plasma at a 3 kiloparsec distance from the sun. It may also be associated with a gamma-ray source discovered by the Energetic Gamma Ray Experiment Telescope (EGRET) on board the COMPTON-Gamma Ray Observatory satellite. Before the discovery of LS 5039, merely a handful of microquasars had been identified in the Galaxy, and none of them was detected in high-energy gamma-rays.
Long-term X-ray variability of the microquasar system LS 5039/RX J1826.2-1450
P. Reig,M. Ribo,J. M. Paredes,J. Marti
Physics , 2003, DOI: 10.1051/0004-6361:20030674
Abstract: We report on the results of the spectral and timing analysis of a BeppoSAX observation of the microquasar system LS 5039/RX J1826.2-1450. The source was found in a low-flux state with Fx(1-10 keV)= 4.7 x 10^{-12} erg cm^{-2} s^{-1}, which represents almost one order of magnitude lower than a previous RXTE observation 2.5 years before. The 0.1--10 keV spectrum is described by an absorbed power-law continuum with photon-number spectral index Gamma=1.8+-0.2 and hydrogen column density of NH=1.0^{+0.4}_{-0.3} x 10^{22} cm^{-2}. According to the orbital parameters of the system the BeppoSAX observation covers the time of an X-ray eclipse should one occur. However, the 1.6-10 keV light curve does not show evidence for such an event, which allows us to give an upper limit to the inclination of the system. The low X-ray flux detected during this observation is interpreted as a decrease in the mass accretion rate onto the compact object due to a decrease in the mass-loss rate from the primary.
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