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Search Results: 1 - 10 of 401434 matches for " M. Doser "
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M. Doser,A. Palano
Physics , 1994,
Abstract: The experimental information on the search for non $q \bar q$ mesons as glueballs, hybrids and multiquark states is reviewed. Candidate states which are particularly amenable to detailed study by accumulating large samples of $J/\psi$, $\eta_c$, $\chi$ decays at a $\tau$-charm factory are discussed.
Imaging the Deep Structure of the Central DeathValley Basin Using Receiver Function, Gravity,and Magnetic Data  [PDF]
Musa Hussein, Laura Serpa, Diane Doser, Aaron Velasco
International Journal of Geosciences (IJG) , 2011, DOI: 10.4236/ijg.2011.24069
Abstract: We use receiver function, gravity, and magnetic data to image the deep structures of central Death Valley. Receiver function analysis suggests the Moho is 24 km deep in the central part of the basin and deepens to 33 km to the east and 31 km to the west. The estimated lower crustal density is 2900 kg/m3, which suggests a gabbroic composition, whereas the upper crustal density, excluding basin sediments, is estimated to average 2690 kg/m3 or approximately a quartzofeldspathic composition. We modeled the magnetic sources as upper crustal to suggest a relatively shallow Curie depth in this region of high heat flow. We developed models to test the hypothesis that a low-density, non-magnetic body (magma or fluid-rich material?) within the lower crust at a depth of 15 km could coincide with the location of the Death Valley bright spot imaged on a deep seismic reflection profile. Those models suggest that if there is a low density region in the mid to lower crust in the area of the bright spot, then the region is also likely to be underplated by mafic or ultramafic materials which may have contributed to heating, uplift, and thinning of the crust during extension.
Role of sedimentation in continental rifting from comparing two narrow rift valleys the Salton Trough and Death Valley-California  [PDF]
Musa Hussein, Laura F. Serpa, Aaron A. Velasco, Diane Doser
Natural Science (NS) , 2011, DOI: 10.4236/ns.2011.311119
Abstract: To unravel the forces and better understand the processes that drive continental rifting, and to understand the role of sedimentation in promoting the rifting process, we compare; the different geological features of two narrow rifts, the Salton Trough and Death Valley, California. According to our models, the Moho is 22 km deep to the southwest of the Salton Sea on US-Mexico border and it deepens to 30 km in the region west of the Salton Trough. In Death Valley, the Moho is 24 km deep in the central part of the basin and it deepens to 32 km outside of the basin. The dome shaped Moho in both rifts is suggested to be primarily the product of magmatic activity in the lower crust and upper mantle. Death Valley is narrow rift in the initial stage of rifting with several sedimentary basins 2 - 4 km deep. In Death Valley magmatic (thermal) forces appears to drive the rifting process. The Salton Trough is wider than Death Valley and is moving toward sea floor spreading. The depth of the sedimentary basins ranges from 8 - 10 km and a combination of thermal and sedimentation appears to drive rifting processes in the Salton Trough.
The Role of Fluids in Promoting Seismic Activity in Active Spreading Centers of the Salton Trough, California, USA  [PDF]
Musa Hussein, Aaron A. Velasco, Laura Serpa, Diane Doser
International Journal of Geosciences (IJG) , 2012, DOI: 10.4236/ijg.2012.32032
Abstract: We interpret seismic activity in the active spreading centers of the Salton Trough to indicate 1) a magmatic intrusion in the lower crust beneath the active Brawly, Cerro Prieto, Imperial, Elsinore, and San Jacinto fault systems; and 2) fluids in the upper crust that have been released from that magmatic body. The absence of a magmatic body and fluids at the location of fossil spreading centers along the Sand Hill and Algodones faults ndicated by little or no seismic activity in those areas. We show several lines of evidence to point out that both melt and fluids related to the seismic activity. In particular, receiver function analysis, Vp/Vs ratios, and tomographic data reveal low velocity zones coincide with the location of the active spreading centers. High Vp/Vs ratios and low velocity zones in the lower crust and upper mantle attributed to melt inclusion, while low Vp/Vs ratios in the upper crust are attributed water inclusions. Frequency-mag- nitude distributions characterized by high b-values in southern California; high b-values have also been associated with crustal fluids. A crustal scale model developed from the receiver functions, gravity, and magnetic data supports the existence of a magmatic intrusion within about 20 km of the surface southwest of the Salton Sea, that intrusion extends for 70 km in a SW-NE direction.
Laser Cooling of Molecular Anions
Pauline Yzombard,Mehdi Hamamda,Sebastian Gerber,Michael Doser,Daniel Comparat
Physics , 2015, DOI: 10.1103/PhysRevLett.114.213001
Abstract: We propose a scheme for laser cooling of negatively charged molecules. We briefly summarise the requirements for such laser cooling and we identify a number of potential candidates. A detailed computation study with C$\_2^-$, the most studied molecular anion, is carried out. Simulations of 3D laser cooling in a gas phase show that this molecule could be cooled down to below 1 mK in only a few tens of milliseconds, using standard lasers. Sisyphus cooling, where no photo-detachment process is present, as well as Doppler laser cooling of trapped C$\_2^-$, are also simulated. This cooling scheme has an impact on the study of cold molecules, molecular anions, charged particle sources and antimatter physics.
The First Cold Antihydrogen
M. C. Fujiwara,M. Amoretti,C. Amsler,G. Bonomi,A. Bouchta,P. D. Bowe,C. Carraro,C. L. Cesar,M. Charlton,M. Doser,V. Filippini,A. Fontana,R. Funakoshi,P. Genova,J. S. Hangst,R. S. Hayano,L. V. Jorgensen,V. Lagomarsino,R. Landua,D. Lindelof,E. Lodi Rizzini,M. Macri,N. Madsen,M. Marchesotti,P. Montagna,H. Pruys,C. Regenfus,P. Rielder,A. Rotondi,G. Testera,A. Variola,D. P. van der Werf
Physics , 2004, DOI: 10.1016/j.nima.2004.06.050
Abstract: Antihydrogen, the atomic bound state of an antiproton and a positron, was produced at low energy for the first time by the ATHENA experiment, marking an important first step for precision studies of atomic antimatter. This paper describes the first production and some subsequent developments.
Three Dimensional Annihilation Imaging of Antiprotons in a Penning Trap
M. C. Fujiwara,M. Amoretti,G. Bonomi,A. Bouchta,P. D. Bowe,C. Carraro,C. L. Cesar,M. Charlton,M. Doser,V. Filippini,A. Fontana,R. Funakoshi,P. Genova,J. S. Hangst,R. S. Hayano,L. V. Jorgensen,V. Lagomarsino,R. Landuad,D. Lindelof,E. Lodi Rizzini,M. Macri,N. Madsen,M. Marchesotti,P. Montagna,H. Pruys,C. Regenfus,P. Rielder,A. Rotondi,G. Testera,A. Variola,D. P. van der Werf
Physics , 2004, DOI: 10.1063/1.1635168
Abstract: We demonstrate three-dimensional annihilation imaging of antiprotons trapped in a Penning trap. Exploiting unusual feature of antiparticles, we investigate a previously unexplored regime in particle transport; the proximity of the trap wall. Particle loss on the wall, the final step of radial transport, is observed to be highly non-uniform, both radially and azimuthally. These observations have considerable implications for the production and detection of antihydrogen atoms.
First Production and Detection of Cold Antihydrogen Atoms
M. C. Fujiwara,M. Amoretti,C. Amsler,G. Bonomi,A. Bouchta,P. Bowe,C. Carraro,C. L. Cesar,M. Charlton,M. Doser,V. Filippini,A. Fontana,R. Funakoshi,P. Genova,J. S. Hangst,R. S. Hayano,L. V. Jorgensen,V. Lagomarsino,R. Landua,D. Lindelof,E. Lodi Rizzini,M. Marchesotti,M. Macri,N. Madsen,P. Montagna,H. Pruys,C. Regenfus,P. Rielder,A. Rotondi,G. Testera,A. Variola,D. P. van der Werf
Physics , 2003, DOI: 10.1016/S0168-583X(03)01775-0
Abstract: The ATHENA experiment recently produced the first atoms of cold antihydrogen. This paper gives a brief review of how this was achieved.
Positron plasma diagnostics and temperature control for antihydrogen production
ATHENA Collaboration,M. Amoretti,C. Amsler,G. Bonomi,A. Bouchta,P. D. Bowe,C. Carraro,C. L. Cesar,M. Charlton,M. Doser,V. Filippini,A. Fontana,M. C. Fujiwara,R. Funakoshi,P. Genova,J. S. Hangst,R. S. Hayano,L. V. Jorgensen,V. Lagomarsino,R. Landua,D. Lindelof,E. Lodi Rizzini,M. Macri',N. Madsen,G. Manuzio,P. Montagna,H. Pruys,C. Regenfus,A. Rotondi,G. Testera,A. Variola,D. P. van der Werf
Physics , 2003, DOI: 10.1103/PhysRevLett.91.055001
Abstract: Production of antihydrogen atoms by mixing antiprotons with a cold, confined, positron plasma depends critically on parameters such as the plasma density and temperature. We discuss non-destructive measurements, based on a novel, real-time analysis of excited, low-order plasma modes, that provide comprehensive characterization of the positron plasma in the ATHENA antihydrogen apparatus. The plasma length, radius, density, and total particle number are obtained. Measurement and control of plasma temperature variations, and the application to antihydrogen production experiments are discussed.
Production of Cold Antihydrogen with ATHENA for Fundamental Studies
ATHENA Collaboration,A. Kellerbauer,M. Amoretti,C. Amsler,G. Bonomi,P. D. Bowe,C. Canali,C. Carraro,C. L. Cesar,M. Charlton,M. Doser,A. Fontana,M. C. Fujiwara,R. Funakoshi,P. Genova,J. S. Hangst,R. S. Hayano,I. Johnson,L. V. J?rgensen,V. Lagomarsino,R. Landua,E. Lodi Rizzini,M. Macrí,N. Madsen,G. Manuzio,D. Mitchard,P. Montagna,H. Pruys,C. Regenfus,A. Rotondi,G. Testera,A. Variola,L. Venturelli,D. P. van der Werf,Y. Yamazaki,N. Zurlo
Physics , 2004,
Abstract: Since the beginning of operations of the CERN Antiproton Decelerator in July 2000, the successful deceleration, storage and manipulation of antiprotons has led to remarkable progress in the production of antimatter. The ATHENA Collaboration were the first to create and detect cold antihydrogen in 2002, and we can today produce large enough amounts of antiatoms to study their properties as well as the parameters that govern their production rate.
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