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Search Results: 1 - 10 of 199640 matches for " Louise N. Burgoyne "
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Neighbourhood perceptions of physical activity: a qualitative study
Louise N Burgoyne, Catherine Woods, Rosarie Coleman, Ivan J Perry
BMC Public Health , 2008, DOI: 10.1186/1471-2458-8-101
Abstract: This study explored determinants of engaging in physical activity in two Irish city based neighbourhoods using a series of six focus groups and twenty five interviews with adult residents. Data were analysed using constant comparison methods with a grounded theory approach.Study findings centred on the concept of 'community contentment'. Physical activity was related to the degree of contentment/comfort within the 'self' and how the 'self' interacts within the neighbourhood. Contemporary focus on outer bodily appearance and pressure to comply with societal expectations influenced participants' sense of confidence and competence. Social interaction, involvement, and provision of adequate social supports were viewed as positive and motivating. However normative expectations appeared to affect participants' ability to engage in physical activity, which may reflect the 'close knit' culture of the study neighbourhoods. Access to suitable local facilities and amenities such as structured and pleasant walking routes was regarded as essential. Indeed participants considered walking to be their preferred form of physical activity which may relate to the minimal skill requirement, ease of access and low financial costs incurred.In the context of physical activity, health promoters need to be conscious of the difficulties that individuals feel in relation to bodily appearance and the pressure to comply with societal standards. This may be particularly relevant in low income settings where insufficient allocation of resources and social supports means that individuals have less opportunity to attend to physical activity than individuals living in higher income settings.Physical inactivity is a major public health concern. Vulnerable sectors associated with lowest levels of leisure time activity include those with low levels of education and income [1-3]. There are limited theoretically based qualitative studies exploring participation in physical activity and sport [4]Descripti
Undergraduate medical research: the student perspective
Louise N. Burgoyne,Siun O'Flynn,Geraldine B. Boylan
Medical Education Online , 2010, DOI: 10.3402/meo.v15i0.5212
Abstract: Background: Research training is essential in a modern undergraduate medical curriculum. Our evaluation aimed to (a) gauge students’ awareness of research activities, (b) compare students’ perceptions of their transferable and research-specific skills competencies, (c) determine students’ motivation for research and (d) obtain students’ personal views on doing research. Methods: Undergraduate medical students (N=317) completed a research skills questionnaire developed by the Centre for Excellence in Teaching and Learning in Applied Undergraduate Research Skills (CETL-AURS) at Reading University. The questionnaire assessed students’ transferable skills, research-specific skills (e.g., study design, data collection and data analysis), research experience and attitude and motivation towards doing research. Results: The majority of students are motivated to pursue research. Graduate entrants and male students appear to be the most confident regarding their research skills competencies. Although all students recognise the role of research in medical practice, many are unaware of the medical research activities or successes within their university. Of those who report no interest in a career incorporating research, a common perception was that researchers are isolated from patients and clinical practice. Discussion: Students have a narrow definition of research and what it entails. An explanation for why research competence does not align more closely with research motivation is derived from students’ lack of understanding of the concept of translational research, as well as a lack of awareness of the research activity being undertaken by their teachers and mentors. We plan to address this with specific research awareness initiatives.
An assessment of medical students’ awareness of radiation exposures associated with diagnostic imaging investigations
Jennifer O’Sullivan,Owen J. O’Connor,Kevin O’Regan,Bronagh Clarke,Louise N. Burgoyne,Max F. Ryan,Michael M. Maher
Insights into Imaging , 2010, DOI: 10.1007/s13244-010-0009-8
Abstract: Assessment of students’ awareness of radiation exposures in diagnostic imaging demonstrates improved performance with increasing years in medical school and/or increasing exposure to CICR. Findings support the Euroatom 97 directive position, advocating implementation of radiation protection instruction into the undergraduate medical curriculum.
Using standardized patients to assess communication skills in medical and nursing Students
C Anthony Ryan, Nuala Walshe, Robert Gaffney, Andrew Shanks, Louise Burgoyne, Connie M Wiskin
BMC Medical Education , 2010, DOI: 10.1186/1472-6920-10-24
Abstract: Eight tutors from the Schools of Nursing and Medicine at University College Cork were trained in the use of a validated communication skills and attitudes holistic assessment tool. A total of forty six medical students (Year 2 of 5) and sixty four nursing students (Year 2/3 of 4) were selected to under go individual CCS assessment by the tutors via an SPE led scenario. Immediate formative feedback was provided by the SPE's for the students. Students who did not pass the assessment were referred for remediation CCS learning.Almost three quarters of medical students (33/46; 72%) and 81% of nursing students (56/64) passed the CCS assessment in both communication and attitudes categories. All nursing students had English as their first language. Nine of thirteen medical students referred for enhanced learning in CCS did not have English as their first language.A significant proportion of both medical and nursing students required referral for enhanced training in CCS. Medical students requiring enhanced training were more likely not to have English as a first language.Modern health care has become extremely complex and it continues to grow in complexity because of economic pressures (new levels of efficiency and productivity), and as a result of the increasing capabilities of modern medicine [1]. In addition, enhanced patient rights, autonomy and expectations entail that while students need access to patients in order to learn, patients views on who examines them and their rights to rest and privacy must be respected [2]. Yet the demand for patient access continues unabated across the wide range of health professionals in training. As an example, the Fottrell Report on the future of medical education in Ireland recommends an increase in the intake of students from a level of 395 per annum with 62% non-EU students in 2003, to 725 per annum with a projected 25% of places targeted for non-EU intake [3]. The above issues and other potent drives of change require innovative,
Techno-euphoria and the world-improving dream: Gladiator Techno-euphoria and the world-improving dream: Gladiator
Robert Burgoyne
Ilha do Desterro , 2008,
Abstract: In this essay, I explore the potential of the epic genre as a form of transnational cinema, and reconsider its traditional role as a vehicle of national ideology and aspirations. I suggest that the contemporary historical epic conveys a sense of double-voicing by adapting epic themes usually associated with national narratives to collectivities that are not framed by nation. Reading the epic alongside the work of Giorgio Agamben, I draw particular attention to the ways that the contemporary epic foregrounds the potential of “bare life” as a form of historical agency, emphasizing the emergence of the multitude and the mongrel community. I also consider the particular formal characteristics of the epic film—its design-intensive mise-en-scène, its use of spectacle and its style of sensory expansiveness—as producing an affective and emotional relation to the historical past, creating a fullness of engagement and amplitude of consciousness. In this essay, I explore the potential of the epic genre as a form of transnational cinema, and reconsider its traditional role as a vehicle of national ideology and aspirations. I suggest that the contemporary historical epic conveys a sense of double-voicing by adapting epic themes usually associated with national narratives to collectivities that are not framed by nation. Reading the epic alongside the work of Giorgio Agamben, I draw particular attention to the ways that the contemporary epic foregrounds the potential of “bare life” as a form of historical agency, emphasizing the emergence of the multitude and the mongrel community. I also consider the particular formal characteristics of the epic film—its design-intensive mise-en-scène, its use of spectacle and its style of sensory expansiveness—as producing an affective and emotional relation to the historical past, creating a fullness of engagement and amplitude of consciousness.
Modernism and the narrative of nation in jfk Modernism and the narrative of nation in jfk
Robert Burgoyne
Ilha do Desterro , 2008,
Abstract: The debate over Oliver Stone’s JFK has been framed to date largely within the discourse of historiography, with greatest attention being paid to issues concerning the limits of fact and fiction, and the erosion of the presumed boundry between documentary and imaginative reconstruction.2 Defenders of the film have usually argued from a deeply theoretical position, pointing out the permeable nature of the border between factual discourse and imaginative reconstruction, as well as the protean quality of even the most substantial documentary record of the past.3 In this essay, I wish to shift the angle of approach to the film in order to consider another set of questions, revolving chiefly around the tension between the film’s formal innovations and its explicit aim to articulate a narrative of national cohesion. The film’s fragmentary form, I argue, can be revealingly seen as an expression of a national narrative in disorder and disarray, its collage-like narrative structure reflecting the disruption of the evolutionary or historical narrative that gives continuity to national identity. The debate over Oliver Stone’s JFK has been framed to date largely within the discourse of historiography, with greatest attention being paid to issues concerning the limits of fact and fiction, and the erosion of the presumed boundry between documentary and imaginative reconstruction.2 Defenders of the film have usually argued from a deeply theoretical position, pointing out the permeable nature of the border between factual discourse and imaginative reconstruction, as well as the protean quality of even the most substantial documentary record of the past.3 In this essay, I wish to shift the angle of approach to the film in order to consider another set of questions, revolving chiefly around the tension between the film’s formal innovations and its explicit aim to articulate a narrative of national cohesion. The film’s fragmentary form, I argue, can be revealingly seen as an expression of a national narrative in disorder and disarray, its collage-like narrative structure reflecting the disruption of the evolutionary or historical narrative that gives continuity to national identity.
Identification of novel Y chromosome encoded transcripts by testis transcriptome analysis of mice with deletions of the Y chromosome long arm
Aminata Touré, Emily J Clemente, Peter JI Ellis, Shantha K Mahadevaiah, Obah A Ojarikre, Penny AF Ball, Louise Reynard, Kate L Loveland, Paul S Burgoyne, Nabeel A Affara
Genome Biology , 2005, DOI: 10.1186/gb-2005-6-12-r102
Abstract: In a search for further candidate genes associated with these defects we analyzed changes in the testis transcriptome resulting from MSYq deletions, using testis cDNA microarrays. This approach, aided by accumulating mouse MSYq sequence information, identified transcripts derived from two further spermatid-expressed multicopy MSYq gene families; like Ssty, each of these new MSYq gene families has multicopy relatives on the X chromosome. The Sly family encodes a protein with homology to the chromatin-associated proteins XLR and XMR that are encoded by the X chromosomal relatives. The second MSYq gene family was identified because the transcripts hybridized to a microarrayed X chromosome-encoded testis cDNA. The X loci ('Astx') encoding this cDNA had 92-94% sequence identity to over 100 putative Y loci ('Asty') across exons and introns; only low level Asty transcription was detected. More strongly transcribed recombinant loci were identified that included Asty exons 2-4 preceded by Ssty1 exons 1, 2 and part of exon 3. Transcription from the Ssty1 promotor generated spermatid-specific transcripts that, in addition to the variable inclusion of Ssty1 and Asty exons, included additional exons because of the serendipitous presence of splice sites further downstream.We identified further MSYq-encoded transcripts expressed in spermatids and deriving from multicopy Y genes, deficiency of which may underlie the defects in sperm development associated with MSYq deletions.The mammalian Y chromosome seems predisposed to accumulating multiple copies of genes that play a role in spermatogenesis [1-7]. Determining the precise functions of such multicopy genes is inherently difficult. In humans and mouse, indications as to function have so far derived from the analysis of naturally occurring deletion mutants. In the mouse, deletions in MSYq (the Y chromosome long arm, excluding the pseudo-autosomal region) affect sperm development (spermiogenesis) and function, with the severity of t
Identification of the CRE-1 Cellulolytic Regulon in Neurospora crassa
Jianping Sun,N. Louise Glass
PLOS ONE , 2012, DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0025654
Abstract: In filamentous ascomycete fungi, the utilization of alternate carbon sources is influenced by the zinc finger transcription factor CreA/CRE-1, which encodes a carbon catabolite repressor protein homologous to Mig1 from Saccharomyces cerevisiae. In Neurospora crassa, deletion of cre-1 results in increased secretion of amylase and β-galactosidase.
The Delivery and Quality of Sexually Transmitted Infections Treatment by Private General Practitioners in Windhoek Namibia
Scholastika N Iipinge,Louise Pretorius
Global Journal of Health Science , 2012, DOI: 10.5539/gjhs.v4n5p156
Abstract: Introduction: The main objective for this study was to investigate the quality of Sexually Transmitted Infections (STI) treatment and control by the private sector in Namibia. Method: This was a cross-sectional study employing quantitative methodology using different methods of data collection. A self-administered questionnaire exploring General Practitioners (GPs) perceptions of factors that influence the way they manage Sexually Transmitted Infections (STI) which was then concluded with the face to face interviews and the checklist that was used while doing observations in the consulting rooms Results: A total of 50 private general practitioners in the area of Windhoek were interviewed, 48 self-administered questionnaires plus all checklists were received back from the private general practitioners. None of the private general practitioners interviewed had specific training in the syndromic management of the STIs. The 86% of all patients were seen by these private general practitioners on a medical aid, while 14 % pay cash for service provided. With regard to Urethral Discharge, an average of 56.5% of GPs could treat urethral discharge correctly as per the Namibian syndromic approach guidelines. None of the GPs could demonstrate the correct treatment of genital ulcer (whether they received medical aid or not) as recommended in the syndromic approach guidelines in Namibia (GRN, 1999; 2000). Only 28% of the GPs could demonstrate the correct treatment of Pelvic Inflammatory Disease (PID) as per the syndromic management of the STIs. For patients without medical aid the drugs prescribed and their dosages for PID are correct but the frequencies are not in line with the guidelines as for patients with medical aid. Discussion: In general, patients presenting with STIs to the GPs in private practices are not given quality of care because not all private general practitioners have time to do investigations, counseling, give condoms and to notify the partners of those with urethral discharge, genital ulcers and PID looking for treatment.
Collecting, archiving and processing DNA from wildlife samples using FTA? databasing paper
LM Smith, LA Burgoyne
BMC Ecology , 2004, DOI: 10.1186/1472-6785-4-4
Abstract: FTA? databasing paper is widely used in human forensic analysis for the storage of biological samples and for purification of nucleic acids. The possible uses of FTA? databasing paper in the purification of DNA from samples of wildlife origin were examined, with particular reference to problems expected due to the nature of samples of wildlife origin. The processing of blood and tissue samples, the possibility of excess DNA in blood samples due to nucleated erythrocytes, and the analysis of degraded samples were all examined, as was the question of long term storage of blood samples on FTA? paper. Examples of the end use of the purified DNA are given for all protocols and the rationale behind the processing procedures is also explained to allow the end user to adjust the protocols as required.FTA? paper is eminently suitable for collection of, and purification of nucleic acids from, biological samples from a wide range of wildlife species. This technology makes the collection and storage of such samples much simpler.Techniques involving the analysis of DNA have become ubiquitous in many areas of wildlife research, such as systematics, pathogen detection, and studies of relatedness amongst populations. Unfortunately the transport of fresh or 'wet' samples from the point of collection involves leakage risks and the possibility of sample degradation due to temperature variation and spoilage. Extracted DNA or stored tissue may also degrade in the laboratory, resulting in problems for re-analysis of samples.We describe here the storage of biological samples on FTA? paper (commercially available reagent-loaded papers similar to filing cards). These cards have been used for some time in forensic human biology [1,2] and their characteristics are well understood. Processing is often a simple washing in-situ, with impurities being washed away and the DNA sample being retained on the paper. The storage of material on these papers allows the re-interrogation of the DNA at any t
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