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Search Results: 1 - 10 of 3268 matches for " Linda Seefeld "
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Risk Factors for Buruli Ulcer in Ghana—A Case Control Study in the Suhum-Kraboa-Coaltar and Akuapem South Districts of the Eastern Region
Ernest Kenu ,Kofi Mensah Nyarko,Linda Seefeld,Vincent Ganu,Michael K?ser,Margaret Lartey,Benedict Nii Laryea Calys-Tagoe,Kwodwo Koram,Richard Adanu,Oliver Razum,Edwin Afari,Fred N. Binka
PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases , 2014, DOI: 10.1371/journal.pntd.0003279
Abstract: Background Buruli ulcer (BU) is a skin disease caused by Mycobacterium ulcerans. Its exact mode of transmission is not known. Previous studies have identified demographic, socio-economic, health and hygiene as well as environment related risk factors. We investigated whether the same factors pertain in Suhum-Kraboa-Coaltar (SKC) and Akuapem South (AS) Districts in Ghana which previously were not endemic for BU. Methods We conducted a case control study. A case of BU was defined as any person aged 2 years or more who resided in study area (SKC or AS District) diagnosed according to the WHO clinical case definition for BU and matched with age- (+/?5 years), gender-, and community controls. A structured questionnaire on host, demographic, environmental, and behavioural factors was administered to participants. Results A total of 113 cases and 113 community controls were interviewed. Multivariate conditional logistic regression analysis identified presence of wetland in the neighborhood (OR = 3.9, 95% CI = 1.9–8.2), insect bites in water/mud (OR = 5.7, 95% CI = 2.5–13.1), use of adhesive when injured (OR = 2.7, 95% CI = 1.1–6.8), and washing in the Densu river (OR = 2.3, 95% CI = 1.1–4.96) as risk factors associated with BU. Rubbing an injured area with alcohol (OR = 0.21, 95% CI = 0.008–0.57) and wearing long sleeves for farming (OR = 0.29, 95% CI = 0.14–0.62) showed protection against BU. Conclusion This study identified the presence of wetland, insect bites in water, use of adhesive when injured, and washing in the river as risk factors for BU; and covering limbs during farming as well as use of alcohol after insect bites as protective factors against BU in Ghana. Until paths of transmission are unraveled, control strategies in BU endemic areas should focus on these known risk factors.
Prepara??o de nanocompósitos através do encapsulamento de polímeros condutores em 2H-MoS2 e 1T-TiS2
Wypych, Fernando;Seefeld, Natali;Denicoló, Ireno;
Química Nova , 1997, DOI: 10.1590/S0100-40421997000400003
Abstract: nanocomposites obtained by the encapsulation of conducting polymers such as polyaniline and polydiphenylamine in 2h-mos2 and 1t-tis2 are synthesized and characterized by x-ray diffraction and infrared spectrophotometry. the synthesis consists in intercalating the layered compound with n-butyllithium and subsequent exfoliation in water and organic solvents. the nanocomposites are obtained by the adsorption of the polymers into the single-layers sulfides and posterior restacking. the x-ray diffraction measurements showed that the organic conducting polymers are encapsulated in mono and bilayers arrangement in a well-ordered fashion to produce single phase compounds.
Technical evaluation of methods for identifying chemotherapy-induced febrile neutropenia in healthcare claims databases
Weycker Derek,Sofrygin Oleg,Seefeld Kim,Deeter Robert G
BMC Health Services Research , 2013, DOI: 10.1186/1472-6963-13-60
Abstract: Background Healthcare claims databases have been used in several studies to characterize the risk and burden of chemotherapy-induced febrile neutropenia (FN) and effectiveness of colony-stimulating factors against FN. The accuracy of methods previously used to identify FN in such databases has not been formally evaluated. Methods Data comprised linked electronic medical records from Geisinger Health System and healthcare claims data from Geisinger Health Plan. Subjects were classified into subgroups based on whether or not they were hospitalized for FN per the presumptive “gold standard” (ANC <1.0×109/L, and body temperature ≥38.3°C or receipt of antibiotics) and claims-based definition (diagnosis codes for neutropenia, fever, and/or infection). Accuracy was evaluated principally based on positive predictive value (PPV) and sensitivity. Results Among 357 study subjects, 82 (23%) met the gold standard for hospitalized FN. For the claims-based definition including diagnosis codes for neutropenia plus fever in any position (n=28), PPV was 100% and sensitivity was 34% (95% CI: 24–45). For the definition including neutropenia in the primary position (n=54), PPV was 87% (78–95) and sensitivity was 57% (46–68). For the definition including neutropenia in any position (n=71), PPV was 77% (68–87) and sensitivity was 67% (56–77). Conclusions Patients hospitalized for chemotherapy-induced FN can be identified in healthcare claims databases--with an acceptable level of mis-classification--using diagnosis codes for neutropenia, or neutropenia plus fever.
Nonstandard Cutoff Effects in the Nonlinear Sigma Model
Martin Hasenbusch,Peter Hasenfratz,Ferenc Niedermayer,Bernhard Seefeld,Ulli Wolff
Physics , 2001, DOI: 10.1016/S0920-5632(01)01883-7
Abstract: High precision measurements of the renormalized zero-momentum 4-point coupling g_R and of the Luscher-Weisz-Wolff running coupling gbar(L) = L*m(L) performed with two different lattice actions in the non-perturbative region confirm the earlier observations, that the cutoff effects look linear, in contrast to perturbative considerations. The use of different actions allows one to make a more reliable estimate on the continuum limit. The measurements were done for infinite volume correlation length up to 350.
Creative Expression: Effectiveness of a Weekly Craft Group with Women Who Have Experienced Trauma  [PDF]
Linda Garner
Open Journal of Nursing (OJN) , 2015, DOI: 10.4236/ojn.2015.52011
Abstract: Creativity interventions have been shown to positively influence psychological and emotional health indicators. Nurses can play an important role in the development and implementation of interventions designed to counter the longer-term emotional and psychological consequences of trauma. The purpose of this study was to explore how participation in a nurse-facilitated weekly craft group may influence anxiety, depression, self-esteem, and self-confidence among women who have emotional and physical experienced trauma. A pre/post visual analog scale was used during a 7-week intervention to measure changes in anxiety, depression, stress, self-esteem and self-confidence among a convenience sample of adult female trauma survivors (n = 33). A paired sample t test was used to evaluate the intervention with significance set at p = 0.05. Participant observation and field notes were used for qualitative data generation. Significant reductions were noted in anxiety, depression, and stress along with significant increases in self-esteem and self-confidence. Cohen’s d statistic indicated a large effect size for anxiety (0.72) and stress (0.69). Moderate effect size was determined for self-confidence (0.36), depression (0.41), and self-esteem (0.52). Emergent qualitative themes included: creative expression improved confidence to sooth the self, safe spaces fostered creativity, a sense of accomplishment was stimulated through creative activities, and creative expression groups provided opportunities for positive affirmation. Offered as a complementary intervention, nurse-facilitated creative expression groups can support continued healing long after traditional support services have been exhausted. It is important for nurses to pursue a greater understanding of the art of nursing and the important contribution of creativity when used as a nursing intervention with trauma survivors.
Residual Effects from Occupational Mercury Exposure Include a Proposed Mercury Tremor Biomarker or “Fingerprint”  [PDF]
Linda Jones
Journal of Environmental Protection (JEP) , 2017, DOI: 10.4236/jep.2017.810068
Abstract: The study investigated residual effects of high levels of occupational mercury exposure, 30 years after a cohort of women worked in public service dentistry. They had all used copper amalgam in a pellet form that required heating and handling, and silver amalgam before the encapsulated form was available. Mercury handling practices changed in the mid-1970 when the workforce was urine tested and mercury poisoning became apparent. The aim was to compare control group and exposed group scores on tasks from a neurobehavioural test battery; plus survey results from a composite health, work history and environmental influences survey. The findings showed that the exposed and control groups were equivalent not only on those variables that one would want to be matched (age, alcohol consumption), but also on many of the cognitive and psychomotor test scores. The present paper focuses on psychomotor skill and tremor patterns. Tremor patterns were seen as generating new evidence of long term effects of the historic mercury insult. Data also suggest that there may be a distinctive mercury “fingerprint”, in samples of sinusoidal waveforms that may have potential as a non-invasive sub-clinical biomarker for adverse effects of mercury exposure, in screening or workplace monitoring.
Doen?a de Kennedy: Relato de dois casos
Seefeld, M.;Cunha, F. Marcos;Ferraz, Leila Elizabeth;Scola, Rosana Herminia;Werneck, Lineu Cesar;
Arquivos de Neuro-Psiquiatria , 1995, DOI: 10.1590/S0004-282X1995000300017
Abstract: we report two cases of kennedy's disease (muscle weakness, amyotrophy, intentional tremor, endocrine abnormalities, and denervation signs at electromyography). this entity must be differentiated from other motor neuron disorders by the genetic pattern (x-liked recessive), gynecomastia, testicular atrophy, oligospermia and good prognosis. a discussion about the clinical pattern and evolution is made.
Thromboelastography: Current Applications, Future Directions  [PDF]
Linda M. Trapani
Open Journal of Anesthesiology (OJAnes) , 2013, DOI: 10.4236/ojanes.2013.31007
Abstract:

Analyzing coagulability often hinges on patient surveillance using prothrombin time (PT) or international normalized ratio (INR) and activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT) to monitor the extrinsic and intrinsic coagulation pathways, respectively A more complete assessment, however, can often be obtained using thromboelastography (TEG), a coagulation assay that evaluates the efficiency of clot formation, as well as the viscoelastic properties of the clot. Developed by Dr. Helmut Hartert in 1948 at the UniversityofHeidelberg, it provides information regarding hemostasis as a dynamic process [1,2]. Here, the TEG technique will be described, as well as its current applications and future directions for its use.

Feasibility of bioelectric impedance as a measure of muscle mass in mechanically ventilated ICU patients  [PDF]
Linda L. Chlan
Open Journal of Nursing (OJN) , 2014, DOI: 10.4236/ojn.2014.41008
Abstract:

Background: Critically ill patients receiving prolonged mechanical ventilatory support are at risk for loss of muscle mass and muscle strength from immobility. Feasible, non-invasive methods are needed to accurately obtain data on markers of muscle mass to design effective interventions and monitor patient progress during recovery from critical illness. Bioelectric impedance has been used in other settings to obtain data on body composition and muscle mass. Purpose: The aims of this study were to determine the feasibility of bioelectric impedance as a marker of muscle mass in a sample of mechanically ventilated patients and to assess data trends in these obtained values. Methods: A descriptive design was used to obtain standard bioelectric impedance parameters (total body resistance, legs resistance, and percent lean body mass) over 4 days from eligible patients already enrolled in a randomized clinical trial. Results: Bioimpedance parameters were readily obtained over 4 days in a sample of 43 patients (age 59 + 15.7 years, 56% male) receiving prolonged ventilatory support (mean 9.4 + 10.4 days) due to respiratory failure. Reasons for not obtaining impedance measures included skin impairment, monitoring devices, or presence of implantable cardiac defibrillator or pacemaker. Average total body impedance was 464.3 + 117.1 ohms, while average impedance of legs was 479.1 + 146.4 ohms. Lean body mass was 68.4% (+10.8). Conclusions/Implications for Practice: With carefully trained staff and a standardized measurement protocol, bioimpedance is a feasible method to obtain body composition data reflective of muscle mass in mechanically ventilated patients. Further research will determine the utility of bioimpedance to monitor recovery and effectiveness of interventions to restore function after prolonged periods of ventilatory support and immobility in mechanically ventilated patients.

Bioremediation of Lead(II) from Polluted Wastewaters Employing Sulphuric Acid Treated Maize Tassel Biomass  [PDF]
Mambo Moyo, Linda Chikazaza
American Journal of Analytical Chemistry (AJAC) , 2013, DOI: 10.4236/ajac.2013.412083
Abstract:

The ability to modify a waste by-product precursor, maize tassel biomass using sulfuric acid as the activating agent with specific focus on Lead(II) ion from water has been proposed. The treating of maize tassel using sulphuric acid is believed to enhance sorption capacity of Lead(II) ions. For this, batch adsorption mode was adopted for which the effects of initial pH, adsorbent dosage, contact time and initial concentration were investigated. Consequently, it was found that the adsorbent capacity depends on pH; since it increases up to 4.5 and then decreases. The highest percentage of Lead(II) ion removal was achieved in the adsorbent dosage of 1.2 g and at an initial concentration of 10 mg/L metal ion. In an attempt to determine the capacity and rate of Lead(II) removal, isotherm and kinetic data were modeled using appropriate equations. To this end, the adsorption data fitted best into the Langmuir model with an R2 (0.9997) while kinetically the Lead(II) adsorption followed the pseudo-second-order model. Furthermore, as a way to address issues related to sustainability, maize tassel is recommended since the process is considered to be a dual solution for environmental cleaning. From one side, it represents a better way to dispose the maize tassel which has no use after fertilization and on the other hand it is an economic source of carbonaceous materials.

 

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