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Search Results: 1 - 10 of 82950 matches for " Leila Maria Lopes-Bezerra? "
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Esporotricose na gesta??o: relato de cinco casos numa epidemia zoonótica no Rio de Janeiro, Brasil
Costa, Rosane Orofino;Bernardes-Engemann, Andrea Reis;Azulay-Abulafia, Luna;Benvenuto, Fabiana;Neves, Maria de Lourdes Palermo;Lopes-Bezerra, Leila Maria;
Anais Brasileiros de Dermatologia , 2011, DOI: 10.1590/S0365-05962011000500020
Abstract: five cases of sporotrichosis occurring in pregnant women in a zoonotic epidemic in rio de janeiro, brazil, are described. the main clinical features, as well as the challenging therapeutic choices for this specific group of patients, are discussed.
Proteomics-Based Characterization of the Humoral Immune Response in Sporotrichosis: Toward Discovery of Potential Diagnostic and Vaccine Antigens
Anderson Messias Rodrigues?,Geisa Ferreira Fernandes?,Leticia Mendes Araujo?,Paula Portella Della Terra?,Priscila Oliveira dos Santos?,Sandro Antonio Pereira?,Tania Maria Pacheco Schubach?,Eva Burger?,Leila Maria Lopes-Bezerra,Zoilo Pires de Camargo
PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases , 2015, DOI: 10.1371/journal.pntd.0004016
Abstract: Background Sporothrix schenckii and associated species are agents of human and animal sporotrichosis that cause large sapronoses and zoonoses worldwide. Epidemiological surveillance has highlighted an overwhelming occurrence of the highly pathogenic fungus Sporothrix brasiliensis during feline outbreaks, leading to massive transmissions to humans. Early diagnosis of feline sporotrichosis by demonstrating the presence of a surrogate marker of infection can have a key role for selecting appropriate disease control measures and minimizing zoonotic transmission to humans. Methodology We explored the presence and diversity of serum antibodies (IgG) specific against Sporothrix antigens in cats with sporotrichosis and evaluated the utility of these antibodies for serodiagnosis. Antigen profiling included protein extracts from the closest known relatives S. brasiliensis and S. schenckii. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays and immunoblotting enabled us to characterize the major antigens of feline sporotrichosis from sera from cats with sporotrichosis (n = 49), healthy cats (n = 19), and cats with other diseases (n = 20). Principal Findings Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay-based quantitation of anti-Sporothrix IgG exhibited high sensitivity and specificity in cats with sporotrichosis (area under the curve, 1.0; 95% confidence interval, 0.94–1; P<0.0001) versus controls. The two sets of Sporothrix antigens were remarkably cross-reactive, supporting the hypothesis that antigenic epitopes may be conserved among closely related agents. One-dimensional immunoblotting indicated that 3-carboxymuconate cyclase (a 60-kDa protein in S. brasiliensis and a 70-kDa protein in S. schenckii) is the immunodominant antigen in feline sporotrichosis. Two-dimensional immunoblotting revealed six IgG-reactive isoforms of gp60 in the S. brasiliensis proteome, similar to the humoral response found in human sporotrichosis. Conclusions A convergent IgG-response in various hosts (mice, cats, and humans) has important implications for our understanding of the coevolution of Sporothrix and its warm-blooded hosts. We propose that 3-carboxymuconate cyclase has potential for the serological diagnosis of sporotrichosis and as target for the development of an effective multi-species vaccine against sporotrichosis in animals and humans.
Sporothrix schenckii and sporotrichosis
Lopes-Bezerra, Leila M.;Schubach, Armando;Costa, Rosane O.;
Anais da Academia Brasileira de Ciências , 2006, DOI: 10.1590/S0001-37652006000200009
Abstract: for a long time sporotrichosis has been regarded to have a low incidence in brazil; however, recent studies demonstrate that not only the number of reported cases but also the incidence of more severe or atypical clinical forms of the disease are increasing. recent data indicate that these more severe forms occur in about 10% of patients with confirmed diagnosis. the less frequent forms, mainly osteoarticular sporotrichosis, might be associated both with patient immunodepression and zoonotic transmission of the disease. the extracutaneous form and the atypical forms are a challenge to a newly developed serological test, introduced as an auxiliary tool for the diagnosis of unusual clinical forms of sporotrichosis.
Sporothrix schenckii and sporotrichosis
Lopes-Bezerra Leila M.,Schubach Armando,Costa Rosane O.
Anais da Academia Brasileira de Ciências , 2006,
Abstract: For a long time sporotrichosis has been regarded to have a low incidence in Brazil; however, recent studies demonstrate that not only the number of reported cases but also the incidence of more severe or atypical clinical forms of the disease are increasing. Recent data indicate that these more severe forms occur in about 10% of patients with confirmed diagnosis. The less frequent forms, mainly osteoarticular sporotrichosis, might be associated both with patient immunodepression and zoonotic transmission of the disease. The extracutaneous form and the atypical forms are a challenge to a newly developed serological test, introduced as an auxiliary tool for the diagnosis of unusual clinical forms of sporotrichosis.
Differences in Cell Morphometry, Cell Wall Topography and Gp70 Expression Correlate with the Virulence of Sporothrix brasiliensis Clinical Isolates
Rafaela A. Castro, Paula H. Kubitschek-Barreira, Pedro A. C. Teixeira, Glenda F. Sanches, Marcus M. Teixeira, Leonardo P. Quintella, Sandro R. Almeida, Rosane O. Costa, Zoilo P. Camargo, Maria S. S. Felipe, Wanderley de Souza, Leila M. Lopes-Bezerra
PLOS ONE , 2013, DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0075656
Abstract: Sporotrichosis is a chronic infectious disease affecting both humans and animals. For many years, this subcutaneous mycosis had been attributed to a single etiological agent; however, it is now known that this taxon consists of a complex of at least four pathogenic species, including Sporothrix schenckii and Sporothrix brasiliensis. Gp70 was previously shown to be an important antigen and adhesin expressed on the fungal cell surface and may have a key role in immunomodulation and host response. The aim of this work was to study the virulence, morphometry, cell surface topology and gp70 expression of clinical isolates of S. brasiliensis compared with two reference strains of S. schenckii. Several clinical isolates related to severe human cases or associated with the Brazilian zoonotic outbreak of sporotrichosis were genotyped and clustered as S. brasiliensis. Interestingly, in a murine subcutaneous model of sporotrichosis, these isolates showed a higher virulence profile compared with S. schenckii. A single S. brasiliensis isolate from an HIV-positive patient not only showed lower virulence but also presented differences in cell morphometry, cell wall topography and abundant gp70 expression compared with the virulent isolates. In contrast, the highly virulent S. brasiliensis isolates showed reduced levels of cell wall gp70. These observations were confirmed by the topographical location of the gp70 antigen using immunoelectromicroscopy in both species. In addition, the gp70 molecule was sequenced and identified using mass spectrometry, and the sequenced peptides were aligned into predicted proteins using Blastp with the S. schenckii and S. brasiliensis genomes.
Transcriptional and Proteomic Analysis of the Aspergillus fumigatus ΔprtT Protease-Deficient Mutant
Shelly Hagag, Paula Kubitschek-Barreira, Gabriela W. P. Neves, David Amar, William Nierman, Itamar Shalit, Ron Shamir, Leila Lopes-Bezerra, Nir Osherov
PLOS ONE , 2012, DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0033604
Abstract: Aspergillus fumigatus is the most common opportunistic mold pathogen of humans, infecting immunocompromised patients. The fungus invades the lungs and other organs, causing severe damage. Penetration of the pulmonary epithelium is a key step in the infectious process. A. fumigatus produces extracellular proteases to degrade the host structural barriers. The A. fumigatus transcription factor PrtT controls the expression of multiple secreted proteases. PrtT shows similarity to the fungal Gal4-type Zn(2)-Cys(6) DNA-binding domain of several transcription factors. In this work, we further investigate the function of this transcription factor by performing a transcriptional and a proteomic analysis of the ΔprtT mutant. Unexpectedly, microarray analysis revealed that in addition to the expected decrease in protease expression, expression of genes involved in iron uptake and ergosterol synthesis was dramatically decreased in the ΔprtT mutant. A second finding of interest is that deletion of prtT resulted in the upregulation of four secondary metabolite clusters, including genes for the biosynthesis of toxic pseurotin A. Proteomic analysis identified reduced levels of three secreted proteases (ALP1 protease, TppA, AFUA_2G01250) and increased levels of three secreted polysaccharide-degrading enzymes in the ΔprtT mutant possibly in response to its inability to derive sufficient nourishment from protein breakdown. This report highlights the complexity of gene regulation by PrtT, and suggests a potential novel link between the regulation of protease secretion and the control of iron uptake, ergosterol biosynthesis and secondary metabolite production in A. fumigatus.
Endothelial cells, tissue factor and infectious diseases
Lopes-Bezerra, L.M.;Filler, S.G.;
Brazilian Journal of Medical and Biological Research , 2003, DOI: 10.1590/S0100-879X2003000800004
Abstract: tissue factor is a transmembrane procoagulant glycoprotein and a member of the cytokine receptor superfamily. it activates the extrinsic coagulation pathway, and induces the formation of a fibrin clot. tissue factor is important for both normal homeostasis and the development of many thrombotic diseases. a wide variety of cells are able to synthesize and express tissue factor, including monocytes, granulocytes, platelets and endothelial cells. tissue factor expression can be induced by cell surface components of pathogenic microorganisms, proinflammatory cytokines and membrane microparticles released from activated host cells. tissue factor plays an important role in initiating thrombosis associated with inflammation during infection, sepsis, and organ transplant rejection. recent findings suggest that tissue factor can also function as a receptor and thus may be important in cell signaling. the present minireview will focus on the role of tissue factor in the pathogenesis of septic shock, infectious endocarditis and invasive aspergillosis, as determined by both in vivo and in vitro models.
Endothelial cells, tissue factor and infectious diseases
Lopes-Bezerra L.M.,Filler S.G.
Brazilian Journal of Medical and Biological Research , 2003,
Abstract: Tissue factor is a transmembrane procoagulant glycoprotein and a member of the cytokine receptor superfamily. It activates the extrinsic coagulation pathway, and induces the formation of a fibrin clot. Tissue factor is important for both normal homeostasis and the development of many thrombotic diseases. A wide variety of cells are able to synthesize and express tissue factor, including monocytes, granulocytes, platelets and endothelial cells. Tissue factor expression can be induced by cell surface components of pathogenic microorganisms, proinflammatory cytokines and membrane microparticles released from activated host cells. Tissue factor plays an important role in initiating thrombosis associated with inflammation during infection, sepsis, and organ transplant rejection. Recent findings suggest that tissue factor can also function as a receptor and thus may be important in cell signaling. The present minireview will focus on the role of tissue factor in the pathogenesis of septic shock, infectious endocarditis and invasive aspergillosis, as determined by both in vivo and in vitro models.
Adhesion of the human pathogen Sporothrix schenckii to several extracellular matrix proteins
Lima, O.C.;Figueiredo, C.C.;Pereira, B.A.S.;Coelho, M.G.P.;Morandi, V.;Lopes-Bezerra, L.M.;
Brazilian Journal of Medical and Biological Research , 1999, DOI: 10.1590/S0100-879X1999000500020
Abstract: the pathogenic fungus sporothrix schenckii is the causative agent of sporotrichosis. this subcutaneous mycosis may disseminate in immunocompromised individuals and also affect several internal organs and tissues, most commonly the bone, joints and lung. since adhesion is the first step involved with the dissemination of pathogens in the host, we have studied the interaction between s. schenckii and several extracellular matrix (ecm) proteins. the binding of two morphological phases of s. schenckii, yeast cells and conidia, to immobilized type ii collagen, laminin, fibronectin, fibrinogen and thrombospondin was investigated. poly (2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate) (poly-hema) was used as the negative control. cell adhesion was assessed by elisa with a rabbit anti-s. schenckii antiserum. the results indicate that both morphological phases of this fungus can bind significantly to type ii collagen, fibronectin and laminin in comparison to the binding observed with bsa (used as blocking agent). the adhesion rate observed with the ecm proteins (type ii collagen, fibronectin and laminin) was statistically significant (p<0.05) when compared to the adhesion obtained with bsa. no significant binding of conidia was observed to either fibrinogen or thrombospondin, but yeast cells did bind to the fibrinogen. our results indicate that s. schenckii can bind to fibronectin, laminin and type ii collagen and also show differences in binding capacity according to the morphological form of the fungus.
Proteomic analysis of cytosolic proteins associated with petite mutations in Candida glabrata
Loureiro y Penha, C.V.;Kubitschek, P.H.B.;Larcher, G.;Perales, J.;Rodriguez León, I.;Lopes-Bezerra, L.M.;Bouchara, J.P.;
Brazilian Journal of Medical and Biological Research , 2010, DOI: 10.1590/S0100-879X2010007500125
Abstract: the incidence of superficial or deep-seated infections due to candida glabrata has increased markedly, probably because of the low intrinsic susceptibility of this microorganism to azole antifungals and its relatively high propensity to acquire azole resistance. to determine changes in the c. glabrata proteome associated with petite mutations, cytosolic extracts from an azole-resistant petite mutant of c. glabrata induced by exposure to ethidium bromide, and from its azole-susceptible parent isolate were compared by two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. proteins of interest were identified by peptide mass fingerprinting or sequence tagging using a matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization tandem time-of-flight mass spectrometer. tryptic peptides from a total of 160 coomassie-positive spots were analyzed for each strain. sixty-five different proteins were identified in the cytosolic extracts of the parent strain and 58 in the petite mutant. among the proteins identified, 10 were higher in the mutant strain, whereas 23 were lower compared to the parent strain. the results revealed a significant decrease in the enzymes associated with the metabolic rate of mutant cells such as aconitase, transaldolase, and pyruvate kinase, and changes in the levels of specific heat shock proteins. moreover, transketolase, aconitase and catalase activity measurements decreased significantly in the ethidium bromide-induced petite mutant. these data may be useful for designing experiments to obtain a better understanding of the nuclear response to impairment of mitochondrial function associated with this mutation in c. glabrata.
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