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Search Results: 1 - 10 of 538387 matches for " L. V. J?rgensen "
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In situ characterization of delamination and crack growth of a CGO-LSM multi-layer ceramic sample investigated by X-ray tomographic microscopy
R. Bj?rk,V. Esposito,E. M. Lauridsen,P. S. Jrgensen,J. L. Fife,K. B. Andersen,S. P. V. Foghmoes,N. Pryds
Physics , 2014, DOI: 10.1016/j.jeurceramsoc.2014.04.029
Abstract: The densification, delamination and crack growth behavior in a Ce$_{0.9}$Gd$_{0.1}$O$_{1.95}$ (CGO) and (La$_{0.85}$Sr$_{0.15})_{0.9}$MnO$_{3}$ (LSM) multi-layer ceramic sample was studied using in situ X-ray tomographic microscopy (microtomography), to investigate the critical dynamics of crack propagation and delamination in a multilayered sample. Naturally occurring defects, caused by the sample preparation process, are shown not to be critical in sample degradation. Instead defects are nucleated during the debinding step. Crack growth is significantly faster along the material layers than perpendicular to them, and crack growth and delamination only accelerates when sintering occurs.
Better Glycaemic Outcome, Low Levels of Acute Severe Complications, and High Patient Satisfaction in Routine Practice in Type 1 Diabetes Treated with an Insulin Pump  [PDF]
H. J. Gjessing, U. L. Jrgensen, C. C. M?ller, J. Pedersen, E. Grodum, K. Schousboe
Journal of Diabetes Mellitus (JDM) , 2014, DOI: 10.4236/jdm.2014.44042
Abstract: Treatment of patients with Type 1 diabetes with continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (CSII) was re-introduced in Denmark in this millennium and initiated in the diabetes clinic, Fredericia Hospital, in 2005. The aim of the present study was to present yearly data of quality from 2005 to 2013 from a clinical database of patients treated with CSII in routine practice. Methods: A database was established in 2009-2010. Data from 2005 to 2009 are retrospective, data from 2009 to 2013 prospective. From 2009, patient satisfaction was measured by validated questionnaires. Results: By 31 December 2013, the database contained data from 143 active patients. HbA1C (median and range) decreased from 64 (40 - 126) mmol/mol (8.0 (5.8 - 13.7)%) (n = 104) to 60 (36 - 98) mmol/mol (7.6 (5.4 - 11.1)%) (n = 134) (p < 0.001) before and latest year on CSII. The improved glycaemic control was maintained each year until ≥5 years after initiation of CSII (p < 0.01). There was no change in weight. The number of attacks of severe hypoglycaemia was reduced from 60 attacks in 21 patients (n = 104) the year before CSII to only 5 attacks in 5 patients in 2013 (n = 134) (p < 0.01), corresponding to an incidence of 3.7 episodes per 100 patient years. Each year after initiation of CSII until ≥5 years, the number of episodes of severe hypoglycaemia was reduced (p < 0.01). Since 2005, nine episodes of ketoacidosis have been registered in eight patients corresponding to an incidence of 1.4 episodes per 100 patient years. Patient satisfaction was high one year after initiation of CSII (p < 0.01). Conclusion: Change of treatment to CSII is accompanied by an improvement in glycaemic control, very pronounced reduction in severe hypoglycaemia, low levels of diabetic ketoacidosis, and pronounced patient satisfaction.
Temperature characteristics of bacterial sulfate reduction in continental shelf and slope sediments
J. E. Sawicka, B. B. J rgensen,V. Brüchert
Biogeosciences (BG) & Discussions (BGD) , 2012,
Abstract: The temperature responses of sulfate-reducing microbial communities were used as community temperature characteristics for their in situ temperature adaptation, their origin, and dispersal in the deep sea. Sediments were collected from a suite of coastal, continental shelf, and slope sediments from the southwest and southeast Atlantic and permanently cold Arctic fjords from water depths ranging from the intertidal zone to 4327 m. In situ temperatures ranged from 8 °C on the shelf to 1 °C in the Arctic. Temperature characteristics of the active sulfate-reducing community were determined in short-term incubations with 35S-sulfate in a temperature gradient block spanning a temperature range from 0 to 40 °C. An optimum temperature (Topt) between 27 °C and 30 °C for the South Atlantic shelf sediments and for the intertidal flat sediment from Svalbard was indicative of a psychrotolerant/mesophilic sulfate-reducing community, whereas Topt ≤20 °C in South Atlantic slope and Arctic shelf sediments suggested a predominantly psychrophilic community. High sulfate reduction rates (20–50%) at in situ temperatures compared to those at Topt further support this interpretation and point to the importance of the ambient temperature regime for regulating the short-term temperature response of sulfate-reducing communities. A number of cold (<4 °C) continental slope sediments showed broad temperature optima reaching as high as 30 °C, suggesting the additional presence of apparently mesophilic sulfate-reducing bacteria. Since the temperature characteristics of these mesophiles do not fit with the permanently cold deep-sea environment, we suggest that these mesophilic microorganisms are of allochthonous origin and transported to this site. It is likely that they were deposited along with the mass-flow movement of warmer shelf-derived sediment. These data therefore suggest that temperature response profiles of bacterial carbon mineralization processes can be used as community temperature characteristics, and that mixing of bacterial communities originating from diverse locations carrying different temperature characteristics needs to be taken into account to explain temperature response profiles of bacterial carbon mineralization processes in sediments.
Temperature characteristics of bacterial sulfate reduction in continental shelf and slope sediments
J. E. Sawicka,B. B. Jrgensen,V. Brüchert
Biogeosciences (BG) & Discussions (BGD) , 2012, DOI: 10.5194/bg-9-3425-2012
Abstract: The temperature responses of sulfate-reducing microbial communities were used as community temperature characteristics for their in situ temperature adaptation, their origin, and dispersal in the deep sea. Sediments were collected from a suite of coastal, continental shelf, and slope sediments from the southwest and southeast Atlantic and permanently cold Arctic fjords from water depths ranging from the intertidal zone to 4327 m. In situ temperatures ranged from 8 °C on the shelf to 1 °C in the Arctic. Temperature characteristics of the active sulfate-reducing community were determined in short-term incubations with 35S-sulfate in a temperature gradient block spanning a temperature range from 0 to 40 °C. An optimum temperature (Topt) between 27 °C and 30 °C for the South Atlantic shelf sediments and for the intertidal flat sediment from Svalbard was indicative of a psychrotolerant/mesophilic sulfate-reducing community, whereas Topt ≤20 °C in South Atlantic slope and Arctic shelf sediments suggested a predominantly psychrophilic community. High sulfate reduction rates (20–50%) at in situ temperatures compared to those at Topt further support this interpretation and point to the importance of the ambient temperature regime for regulating the short-term temperature response of sulfate-reducing communities. A number of cold (<4 °C) continental slope sediments showed broad temperature optima reaching as high as 30 °C, suggesting the additional presence of apparently mesophilic sulfate-reducing bacteria. Since the temperature characteristics of these mesophiles do not fit with the permanently cold deep-sea environment, we suggest that these mesophilic microorganisms are of allochthonous origin and transported to this site. It is likely that they were deposited along with the mass-flow movement of warmer shelf-derived sediment. These data therefore suggest that temperature response profiles of bacterial carbon mineralization processes can be used as community temperature characteristics, and that mixing of bacterial communities originating from diverse locations carrying different temperature characteristics needs to be taken into account to explain temperature response profiles of bacterial carbon mineralization processes in sediments.
Temperature characteristics of bacterial sulfate reduction in continental shelf and slope sediments
J. E. Sawicka,B. B. Jrgensen,V. Brüchert
Biogeosciences Discussions , 2012, DOI: 10.5194/bgd-9-673-2012
Abstract: The temperature responses of sulfate-reducing microbial communities were used as fingerprints for their in situ temperature adaptation, their origin, and dispersal in the deep-sea. Sediments were collected from a suite of coastal, continental shelf, and slope sediments from the southwest and southeast Atlantic and permanently cold Arctic fjords from water depths ranging from the intertidal zone to 4327 m. In situ temperatures ranged from 8 °C on the shelf to 1 °C on the lower slope and in the Arctic. Temperature characteristics of the active sulfate-reducing community were determined in short-term incubations with 35S-sulfate in a temperature gradient block spanning a temperature range from 0 to 40 °C. An optimum temperature (Topt) between 27 °C and 30 °C for the South Atlantic shelf sediments and for the intertidal flat sediment from Svalbard was indicative of a psychrotolerant/mesophilic sulfate-reducing community, whereas Topt ≤ 20 °C in South Atlantic slope and Arctic shelf sediments suggested a predominantly psychrophilic community. High sulfate reduction rates (20–50%) at in-situ temperatures compared to those at Topt further support this interpretation, and point to the importance of the ambient temperature regime for regulating the short-term temperature response of sulfate-reducing communities. A number of cold (<4 °C) continental slope sediments showed broad temperature optima reaching as high as 30 °C suggesting the additional presence of apparently mesophilic sulfate-reducing bacteria. Since the temperature characteristics of these mesophiles do not fit with the permanently cold deep-sea environment, we suggest that these mesophilic microorganisms are of allochthonous origin and transported to this site. It is likely that they were deposited along with the mass-flow movement of warmer shelf-derived sediment. These data therefore suggest that temperature response profiles of bacterial carbon mineralization processes can be used as fingerprints to infer mixing of bacterial communities of different geographic origins.
Review of Survey activities 2011: Groundwater protection and the role of water supply companies
Petersen, J.D.,Jrgensen, L.F.
Geological Survey of Denmark and Greenland Bulletin , 2012,
Abstract:
Transcriptional Reprogramming of Wheat and the Hemibiotrophic Pathogen Septoria tritici during Two Phases of the Compatible Interaction
Fen Yang, Wanshun Li, Hans J. L. Jrgensen
PLOS ONE , 2013, DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0081606
Abstract: The disease septoria leaf blotch of wheat, caused by fungal pathogen Septoria tritici, is of worldwide concern. The fungus exhibits a hemibiotrophic lifestyle, with a long symptomless, biotrophic phase followed by a sudden transition to necrotrophy associated with host necrosis. Little is known about the systematic interaction between fungal pathogenicity and host responses at specific growth stages and the factors triggering the transition. In order to gain some insights into global transcriptome alterations in both host and pathogen during the two phases of the compatible interaction, disease transition was monitored using pathogenesis-related gene markers and H2O2 signature prior to RNA-Seq. Transcriptome analysis revealed that the slow symptomless growth was accompanied by minor metabolic responses and slightly suppressed defences in the host, whereas necrotrophic growth was associated with enhanced host responses involving energy metabolism, transport, signalling, defence and oxidative stress as well as a decrease in photosynthesis. The fungus expresses distinct classes of stage-specific genes encoding potential effectors, probably first suppressing plant defence responses/facilitating the symptomless growth and later triggering life style transition and inducing host necrosis/facilitating the necrotrophic growth. Transport, signalling, anti-oxidative stress mechanisms and apoplastic nutrient acquisition play important roles in the entire infection process of S. tritici. Our findings uncover systematic S. tritici-induced expression profiles of wheat related to specific fungal infection strategies and provide a transcriptome resource for studying both hosts and pathogens in plant-Dothideomycete interactions.
A revision of Passiflora sections Insignes and ×Inkea (Passifloraceae)
M?ller Jrgensen, Peter,Vásquez, Roberto
Anales del Jardín Botánico de Madrid , 2009,
Abstract: During the compilation of the Passifloraceae for the Catálogo de las Plantas Vasculares de Bolivia we found a new species belonging to Passiflora sect. Insignes, which we call Passiflora carrascoensis. We here present a taxonomic revision of the Passiflora sect. Insignes and ×Inkea and a brief outline of the history of the groups. The number of species in Passiflora sect. Insignes is now six, with four species endemic to Bolivia, one to Peru, and one widespread frequently cultivated species. Passiflora sect. ×Inkea consists of the hybrid Passiflora ×rosea. Four names are lectotypified. Durante la compilación de las Passifloraceae para el Catálogo de las Plantas Vasculares de Bolivia se ha encontrado una nueva especie de Passiflora sect. Insignes, la cual describimos como Passiflora carrascoensis. Se presenta una revisión taxonómica de Passiflora sect. Insignes e ×Inkea y una corta relación de la historia de los grupos. El número actual de especies en Passiflora sect. Insignes es de seis, con cuatro especies endémicas de Bolivia, una de Perú y una especie ampliamente repartida y frecuentemente cultivada. Passiflora sect. ×Inkea está formada por el híbrido Passiflora ×rosea. Se lectotipifican cuatro nombres.
Luminal concentrations of L- and D-lactate in the rectum may relate to severity of disease and outcome in septic patients
Vibeke L Jrgensen, Nanna Reiter, Anders Perner
Critical Care , 2006, DOI: 10.1186/cc5102
Abstract: An intensive care unit observational study was conducted at two university hospitals, and 23 septic patients and 11 healthy subjects were enrolled. Participants were subjected to rectal equilibrium dialysis, and concentrations of L- and D-lactate in dialysates and plasma were analysed by spectrophotometry.Luminal concentrations of L-lactate in rectum were related to the sequential organ failure assessment scores (R2 = 0.27, P = 0.01) and were higher in non-survivors compared to survivors and healthy subjects (mean [range] 5.0 [0.9 to 11.8] versus 2.2 [0.4 to 4.9] and 0.5 [0 to 1.6] mmol/l, respectively, P < 0.0001), with a positive linear trend (R2 = 0.53, P < 0.0001). Also, luminal concentrations of D-lactate were increased in non-survivors compared to survivors and healthy subjects (1.1 [0.3 to 2.5] versus 0.3 [0 to 1.2] and 0.1 [0 to 0.8] mmol/l, respectively, P = 0.01), with a positive linear trend (R2 = 0.14, P = 0.04). Luminal concentrations of L- and D-lactate were unaffected by the site of infection. Plasma concentrations of L-lactate were also increased in non-survivors compared to survivors (3.8 [1.7 to 7.0] versus 1.5 [0 to 3.6] mmol/l, P < 0.01). In contrast, plasma concentrations of D-lactate were equally raised in non-survivors (0.4 [0.1 to 0.7] mmol/l) and survivors (0.3 [0.1 to 0.6] mmol/l) compared with healthy subjects (0.03 [0 to 0.13] mmol/l).In patients with severe sepsis and septic shock, luminal concentrations of L- and D-lactate in the rectum were related to severity of disease and outcome.Intestinal failure may contribute to morbidity and mortality in sepsis [1]. However, little is known about the condition of the large bowel in these patients. It is likely that metabolic products, including L-lactate, do escape the intestines, but most of it may be metabolised by the liver [2,3], hampering systemic assessment. This raises the possibility that increased lactate production in the intestine goes undetected when measuring systemic values.Lumina
Multi-orbital and density-induced tunneling of bosons in optical lattices
D. -S. Lühmann,O. Jürgensen,K. Sengstock
Physics , 2011, DOI: 10.1088/1367-2630/14/3/033021
Abstract: We show that multi-orbital and density-induced tunneling have a significant impact on the phase diagram of bosonic atoms in optical lattices. Off-site interactions lead to density-induced hopping, the so-called bond-charge interactions, which can be identified with an effective tunneling potential and can reach the same order of magnitude as conventional tunneling. In addition, interaction-induced higher-band processes also give rise to strongly modified tunneling, on-site and bond-charge interactions. We derive an extended occupation-dependent Hubbard model with multi-orbitally renormalized processes and compute the corresponding phase diagram. It substantially deviates from the single-band Bose-Hubbard model and predicts strong changes of the superfluid to Mott-insulator transition. In general, the presented beyond-Hubbard physics plays an essential role in bosonic lattice systems and has an observable influence on experiments with tunable interactions.
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