oalib

Publish in OALib Journal

ISSN: 2333-9721

APC: Only $99

Submit

Any time

2019 ( 1 )

2014 ( 4 )

2013 ( 5 )

2012 ( 11 )

Custom range...

Search Results: 1 - 10 of 47 matches for " Kristien Verdonck "
All listed articles are free for downloading (OA Articles)
Page 1 /47
Display every page Item
Formación de investigadores en el contexto de proyectos colaborativos: experiencias en el Instituto de Medicina Tropical "Alexander von Humboldt", Universidad Peruana Cayetano Heredia
Gotuzzo,Eduardo; González,Elsa; Verdonck,Kristien;
Revista Peruana de Medicina Experimental y Salud Pública , 2010, DOI: 10.1590/S1726-46342010000300015
Abstract: research is a main element for human and social development. under this point of view, it involves particular challenges and opportunities for the so-called "developing countries". an approach for those challenges and opportunities comes from the analysis of two interrelated activities; the training of new researchers and the research development with institutions or researchers which are external to the institution ("collaborative research"). both activities are essential for the consolidation, widening and updating of the institutional capabilities for scientific production. we present here the experiences of the instituto de medicina tropical "alexander von humboldt" of the universidad peruana cayetano heredia, in relation to the training of new researchers, we discuss the four elements we consider key for this process; the promotion of stimulating environments for research, the proactive identification of fellows, the complementary advice and networks consolidation; and we analyze three successful models of international collaboration for the training of new researchers under different institutional approaches.
Formación de investigadores en el contexto de proyectos colaborativos: experiencias en el Instituto de Medicina Tropical "Alexander von Humboldt", Universidad Peruana Cayetano Heredia Researchers training in the context of the collaborative projects: experiences of Instituto de Medicina Tropical "Alexander von Humbolt", Universidad Peruana Cayetano Heredia
Eduardo Gotuzzo,Elsa González,Kristien Verdonck
Revista Peruana de Medicina Experimental y Salud Pública , 2010,
Abstract: La investigación constituye un elemento fundamental de desarrollo humano y social. Bajo esta perspectiva, supone desafíos y oportunidades particulares para los llamados países "en vías de desarrollo". Una aproximación a tales desafíos y oportunidades se desprende del análisis de dos actividades interrelacionadas: la formación de nuevos investigadores y el desarrollo de investigación con instituciones o investigadores externos a la propia institución ("investigación colaborativa"). Ambas actividades son esenciales en la consolidación, ampliación y actualización de las capacidades institucionales de producción científica. Presentamos aquí las experiencias del Instituto de Medicina Tropical "Alexander von Humboldt" de la Universidad Peruana Cayetano Heredia con relación a la formación de investigadores; discutimos los cuatro elementos que consideramos clave en dicho proceso: promoción de entornos estimulantes para investigación, identificación proactiva de becarios, asesorías complementarias y consolidación de redes; y analizamos tres modelos de colaboración internacional exitosos en la formación de nuevos investigadores bajo distintas aproximaciones institucionales. Research is a main element for human and social development. Under this point of view, it involves particular challenges and opportunities for the so-called "developing countries". An approach for those challenges and opportunities comes from the analysis of two interrelated activities; the training of new researchers and the research development with institutions or researchers which are external to the institution ("collaborative research"). Both activities are essential for the consolidation, widening and updating of the institutional capabilities for scientific production. We present here the experiences of the Instituto de Medicina Tropical "Alexander von Humboldt" of the Universidad Peruana Cayetano Heredia, in relation to the training of new researchers, we discuss the four elements we consider key for this process; the promotion of stimulating environments for research, the proactive identification of fellows, the complementary advice and networks consolidation; and we analyze three successful models of international collaboration for the training of new researchers under different institutional approaches.
Regulatory T Cell Expansion in HTLV-1 and Strongyloidiasis Co-infection Is Associated with Reduced IL-5 Responses to Strongyloides stercoralis Antigen
Martin Montes ,Cesar Sanchez,Kristien Verdonck,Jordan E. Lake,Elsa Gonzalez,Giovanni Lopez,Angelica Terashima,Thomas Nolan,Dorothy E. Lewis,Eduardo Gotuzzo,A. Clinton White Jr
PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases , 2009, DOI: 10.1371/journal.pntd.0000456
Abstract: Background Human strongyloidiasis varies from a chronic but limited infection in normal hosts to hyperinfection in patients treated with corticosteroids or with HTLV-1 co-infection. Regulatory T cells dampen immune responses to infections. How human strongyloidiasis is controlled and how HTLV-1 infection affects this control are not clear. We hypothesize that HTLV-1 leads to dissemination of Strongyloides stercoralis infection by augmenting regulatory T cell numbers, which in turn down regulate the immune response to the parasite. Objective To measure peripheral blood T regulatory cells and Strongyloides stercoralis larval antigen-specific cytokine responses in strongyloidiasis patients with or without HTLV-1 co-infection. Methods Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were isolated from newly diagnosed strongyloidiasis patients with or without HTLV-1 co-infection. Regulatory T cells were characterized by flow cytometry using intracellular staining for CD4, CD25 and FoxP3. PBMCs were also cultured with and without Strongyloides larval antigens. Supernatants were analyzed for IL-5 production. Results Patients with HTLV-1 and Strongyloides co-infection had higher parasite burdens. Eosinophil counts were decreased in the HTLV-1 and Strongyloides co-infected subjects compared to strongyloidiasis-only patients (70.0 vs. 502.5 cells/mm3, p = 0.09, Mann-Whitney test). The proportion of regulatory T cells was increased in HTLV-1 positive subjects co-infected with strongyloidiasis compared to patients with only strongyloidiasis or asymptomatic HTLV-1 carriers (median = 17.9% vs. 4.3% vs. 5.9 p<0.05, One-way ANOVA). Strongyloides antigen-specific IL-5 responses were reduced in strongyloidiasis/HTLV-1 co-infected patients (5.0 vs. 187.5 pg/ml, p = 0.03, Mann-Whitney test). Reduced IL-5 responses and eosinophil counts were inversely correlated to the number of CD4+CD25+FoxP3+ cells. Conclusions Regulatory T cell counts are increased in patients with HTLV-1 and Strongyloides stercoralis co-infection and correlate with both low circulating eosinophil counts and reduced antigen-driven IL-5 production. These findings suggest a role for regulatory T cells in susceptibility to Strongyloides hyperinfection.
Frequent HTLV-1 infection in the offspring of Peruvian women with HTLV-1-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis or strongyloidiasis
Gotuzzo,Eduardo; Moody,Joel; Verdonck,Kristien; Cabada,Miguel M.; González,Elsa; Van Dooren,Sonia; Vandamme,Anne-Mieke; Terashima,Angélica; Vermund,Sten H.;
Revista Panamericana de Salud Pública , 2007, DOI: 10.1590/S1020-49892007000900001
Abstract: objectives: to describe the frequency of htlv-1 infection among offspring of mothers who had presented with htlv-1-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (ham/tsp), strongyloidiasis, or asymptomatic htlv-1 infection, and to identify factors associated with htlv-1 infection. methods: in a descriptive study, records were reviewed of htlv-1-positive women and their offspring who had been tested for htlv infection at a public hospital in lima, peru, from 1989 to 2003. sons and daughters of women who had presented with strongyloidiasis, ham/tsp, or asymptomatic infection were eligible for this study. results: three hundred seventy subjects were included: 279 were the offspring of 104 mothers presenting with ham/tsp, 58 were the offspring of 22 mothers with strongyloidiasis, and 33 were the offspring of 26 asymptomatic mothers. mean age of the offspring at the time of testing was 26 years (standard deviation 12). nineteen percent of the offspring tested positive for htlv-1: 6% (2/33) of those with asymptomatic mothers, 19% (52/279) among the offspring of mothers with ham/tsp, and 31% (18/58) among the offspring of mothers presenting with strongyloidiasis on multiple logistic regression analysis, three factors were significantly associated with htlv-1: (a) duration of breast-feeding (odds ratio [or] = 15.1; [4.2-54.1] for 12 to 24 months versus less than 6 months breast-feeding); (b) clinical condition of the mother (or = 8.3 [1.0-65.3] for ham/tsp and or = 11.5 [1.4-98.4] for strongyloidiasis in comparison with offspring of asymptomatic mothers); and (c) transfusion history (or = 5.5 [2.0-15.2]). conclusions: in addition to known risk factors for htlv-1 transmission (duration of breast-feeding and history of blood transfusion), maternal ham/tsp and strongyloidiasis were associated with seropositivity among offspring of htlv-1-infected mothers.
Strongyloidiasis and Infective Dermatitis Alter Human T Lymphotropic Virus-1 Clonality in vivo
Nicolas A. Gillet ,Lucy Cook,Daniel J. Laydon,Carol Hlela,Kristien Verdonck,Carolina Alvarez,Eduardo Gotuzzo,Daniel Clark,Lourdes Farré,Achiléa Bittencourt,Becca Asquith,Graham P. Taylor,Charles R. M. Bangham
PLOS Pathogens , 2013, DOI: 10.1371/journal.ppat.1003263
Abstract: Human T-lymphotropic Virus-1 (HTLV-1) is a retrovirus that persists lifelong by driving clonal proliferation of infected T-cells. HTLV-1 causes a neuroinflammatory disease and adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma. Strongyloidiasis, a gastrointestinal infection by the helminth Strongyloides stercoralis, and Infective Dermatitis associated with HTLV-1 (IDH), appear to be risk factors for the development of HTLV-1 related diseases. We used high-throughput sequencing to map and quantify the insertion sites of the provirus in order to monitor the clonality of the HTLV-1-infected T-cell population (i.e. the number of distinct clones and abundance of each clone). A newly developed biodiversity estimator called “DivE” was used to estimate the total number of clones in the blood. We found that the major determinant of proviral load in all subjects without leukemia/lymphoma was the total number of HTLV-1-infected clones. Nevertheless, the significantly higher proviral load in patients with strongyloidiasis or IDH was due to an increase in the mean clone abundance, not to an increase in the number of infected clones. These patients appear to be less capable of restricting clone abundance than those with HTLV-1 alone. In patients co-infected with Strongyloides there was an increased degree of oligoclonal expansion and a higher rate of turnover (i.e. appearance and disappearance) of HTLV-1-infected clones. In Strongyloides co-infected patients and those with IDH, proliferation of the most abundant HTLV-1+ T-cell clones is independent of the genomic environment of the provirus, in sharp contrast to patients with HTLV-1 infection alone. This implies that new selection forces are driving oligoclonal proliferation in Strongyloides co-infection and IDH. We conclude that strongyloidiasis and IDH increase the risk of development of HTLV-1-associated diseases by increasing the rate of infection of new clones and the abundance of existing HTLV-1+ clones.
HIV prevention for young people in Sub-Saharan Africa: effectiveness of interventions and areas for improvement. Evidence from Rwanda.
Michielsen, Kristien
Afrika Focus , 2012,
Abstract: These conclusions and recommendations mainly affect five parties: researchers, intervention managers, evaluators, funders and scientific journal editors. Given the absence of a vaccine or a cure, the focus remains on preventing HIV transmission. By analysing existing data on the determinants of the complex sexual behaviour of young people and their causal pathways, and by gathering additional information, researchers should make unprecedented efforts to develop alternative and more effective interventions. Accepting the complexity of sexual behaviour of young people, also means dealing with a considerable degree of uncertainty and flexibility. Intervention development, implementation and evaluation are to be considered inseparable: results of effectiveness evaluations should be considered of little use if no information is provided on the intervention or its implementation and vice versa. Since the evaluation should be an integral part of the intervention, intervention managers and evaluators need to work in close collaboration, without suspicion. Donors have to accept that a complex intervention cannot be designed beforehand, but requires a process approach that maps risky behaviours, dominant predictors, causal pathways and key stakeholders. This pre-intervention research should be considered a fundamental part of the intervention and donors should be aware that effectiveness depends on this phase, hence funding should be made available. In this process, reality, and not morality, should be at the forefront: young people should be approached as responsible individuals who are able to make their own decisions and need to be made competent to ensure their choice to (not) have sexual intercourse is made autonomous, without coercion or regret and with the necessary in-depth knowledge of risks. This requires a change in attitudes of all stakeholders involved. A complex intervention approach also means that the intervention is monitored and can be changed during its course, resulting in the need for flexible, mixed and triangulated evaluation approaches (“combination evaluation”) and flexible funding strategies. Scientific journals have the responsibility to make innovative approaches public, even though they might not be considered most rigorous by current scientific standards, as well as allow for elaborate reports on intervention development and implementation. We are convinced this can be done if all parties remain conscious of the ultimate objective; eradicating HIV among the important and vulnerable population of young people.
HTLV in the Americas: challenges and perspectives
Carneiro-Proietti,Anna Bárbara F.; Catalan-Soares,Bernadette C.; Castro-Costa,Carlos M.; Murphy,Edward L.; Sabino,Ester C.; Hisada,Michie; Galv?o-Castro,Bernardo; Alcantara,Luiz C. J.; Remondegui,Carlo; Verdonck,Kristien; Proietti,Fernando A.;
Revista Panamericana de Salud Pública , 2006, DOI: 10.1590/S1020-49892006000100007
Abstract: the first description of the human t-lymphotropic virus type 1 (htlv-1) was made in 1980, followed closely by the discovery of htlv-2, in 1982. since then, the main characteristics of these viruses, commonly referred to as htlv-1/2, have been thoroughly studied. central and south america and the caribbean are areas of high prevalence of htlv-1 and htvl-2 and have clusters of infected people. the major modes of transmission have been through sexual contact, blood, and mother to child via breast-feeding. htlv-1 is associated with adult t-cell leukemia/lymphoma (atl), htlv-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (ham/ tsp), and htlv-associated uveitis as well as infectious dermatitis of children. more clarification is needed in the possible role of htlv in rheumatologic, psychiatric, and infectious diseases. since cures for atl and ham/tsp are lacking and no vaccine is available to prevent htlv-1 and htlv-2 transmission, these illnesses impose enormous social and financial costs on infected individuals, their families, and health care systems. for this reason, public health interventions aimed at counseling and educating high-risk individuals and populations are of vital importance. in the americas this is especially important in the areas of high prevalence.
Practice Environment, Work Characteristics and Levels of Burnout as Predictors of Nurse Reported Job Outcomes, Quality of Care and Patient Adverse Events: A Study across Residential Aged Care Services  [PDF]
Peter Van Bogaert, Tinne Dilles, Kristien Wouters, Bart Van Rompaey
Open Journal of Nursing (OJN) , 2014, DOI: 10.4236/ojn.2014.45040
Abstract:

To understand how to create a stabile workforce achieving excellent quality of care and patient safety, associations between practice environments and nurse and patient outcomes have been widely studied in acute and psychiatric care hospitals. Knowing residential aged care services are challenged to tackle complex patients’ needs within certain working conditions, to what extent do nurses perceive their practice environment in geriatric care? In a cross-sectional survey, a sample of 709 registered nurses, licensed practical nurses and nurse aides employed in 25 residential aged care services completed a structured questionnaire composed of various validated instruments measuring nurse practice environment factors, nurse work characteristics, burnout, nurse reported job outcomes, quality and patient adverse events. Associations between variables across residential aged care services were examined using multilevel modelling techniques. Associations were identified between practice environment factors, work characteristics, burnout dimensions, and reported outcome variables across residential aged care services. Multiple multilevel models showed independent variables (nursing management at the unit level, workload, decision latitude, social capital, emotional exhaustion and depersonalization) as important predictors of nurse reported outcome (job satisfaction, turnover intensions), quality of care (at the unit, the last shift, and in the service within the last year) and patient adverse events (patient and family complaints, patient falls, pulmonary and urinary tract infections, and medications errors). Results suggested the importance of nurse practice environment factors, nurse work characteristics and perception of burnout on nurse and patient outcomes across their nurse practice environment. Challenging the complex care of a vulnerable and frail population executives, physicians, nursing leaders as well as nurses in their nurse practice environment shared responsibility to create working conditions achieving excellent quality and patient safety.

Global model simulations of low-pressure oxygen discharges
Roberson, Geraldo;Roberto, Marisa;Verboncoeur, John;Verdonck, Patrick;
Brazilian Journal of Physics , 2007, DOI: 10.1590/S0103-97332007000300019
Abstract: we use a global model (volume averaged) to study plasma discharges in molecular oxygen gas in the 1-100 mtorr pressure range. this model determines densities of positive ions o2+ and o + , negative ion o - , electrons, ground state o2 and o atoms, and metastables o2(a1dg) and o(1d), and electron temperature as function of gas pressure and input power, for a cylindrical discharge. we apply the model to o2 discharges and the results are compared to a particle-in-cell simulation (pic), experimental data and a volume-averaged global model developed at the university of california at berkeley. we find that the total positive ion density increases with pressure at low pressures (up to approximately 30 mtorr), and decreases at higher pressures. the electronegativity decreases with increased power and increased pressure as predicted by the global models presented in the literature. the predictions for electron temperature are also in agreement with these models. however, there is a discrepancy betweeen these global models and pic simulations and experimental data, for 20 and 40 mtorr cases, concerning electronegativity calculations. pic simulations yield much higher electronegativities. there are strong indications that this is due to the assumption of maxwellian electron energy distribution functions in the global model, while in the pic simulations this is clearly not the case.
Universal Design Patterns for stoma care away-from-home
Hubert Froyen,Evelien Verdonck,Dirk De Meester,Ann Heylighen
Australasian Medical Journal , 2009,
Abstract: Accommodating the real diversity of user populations,including those with physical and / or mental impairments and functional limitations, requires a large amount of designinformation in connection with human dis-abilities(limitations and possibilities). In order to collect andorganise this information for designers and decision makers, Universal Design Patterns (UD Patterns) offer descriptive information about, on the one hand, CONFLICTS between users and built environments, and on the other hand,empirically evident design RESOLUTIONS. Directcollaboration with users / experts was tested in thedevelopment of a specific UD Pattern for a (Semi-) ambulant accessible toilet for personal care, with specific emphasis onstoma-care in public facilities. The paper illustrates howpeople with ostomies and care-givers communicate with researchers, and how relevant design information is extracted and structured. On a more general level, results show how environment-related dimensions of human functioning differ from medical aspects, and how direct involvement of end-users enriches the content of design information.
Page 1 /47
Display every page Item


Home
Copyright © 2008-2017 Open Access Library. All rights reserved.