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Search Results: 1 - 10 of 5168 matches for " Koh Ging Wong "
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Rectal Lymphoma: A Diagnostic Challenge  [PDF]
Koh Ging Wong
Open Journal of Gastroenterology (OJGas) , 2015, DOI: 10.4236/ojgas.2015.54004
Abstract: Rectal lymphoma is a rare colorectal tumor with incidence of 0.2% - 0.6%. We report a rare case of large rectal lymphoma. Our patient is a 48-year-old man, presented with 2 months history of per rectal bleed, altered bowel habits and weight loss. Clinical examination, computed tomography scan and initial endoscopic mucosal biopsy were indistinguishable from Rectal Carcinoma. With high level of suspicion, we resorted to full thickness punch biopsy in lithotomy position for a good tissue sample. Ultimately, an immunohistochemical study confirmed Diffuse Large B-cells Lymphoma (DLBCL). This case highlighted the importance of high level of suspicion for lymphoma when dealing with a rectal tumor. Accurate diagnosis of rectal lymphoma affects the treatment modalities and prognosis of the patient.
THE BLUE MAN WHO PRESENTED WITH A STROKE
KOH KC,WONG MH
Malaysian Family Physician , 2011,
Abstract: A 19-year-old man presented with sudden onset of right eye ptosis, diplopia and giddiness. He had no previous medical illnesses with negative history of exertional dyspnoea, epistaxis, haemoptysis, palpitations, chest pain and chronic cough. Examination revealed central cyanosis, digital clubbing, polycythaemia, partial ptosis of right eye, diplopia on right gaze and dilated right pupil. Examination of the chest revealed pectus excavatum but no cardiac murmurs were heard. Investigations revealed a solitary right pulmonary arteriovenous malformation with two feeder vessels which were successfully embolized surgically.
Ratio of Capacitance/BMI Reflects Deficit in Nutritional Concentration While CH2 Reflects Total Nutritional Deficit in CAPD Patients and General Population  [PDF]
Keng-Hee Koh, Hin-Seng Wong
Open Journal of Nephrology (OJNeph) , 2013, DOI: 10.4236/ojneph.2013.34034
Abstract:

Traditionally phase angle was the best predictor in BIA for nutrition and survival in dialysis population. We recently showed that normalized bioimpedance indices are a better risk discriminator for dialysis patients and the general popu-lation. We hereby aimed to explore discriminating factors behind them. Methods: We assessed the body capacitive index (BCI = Capacitance × Height2/Weight); body resistive index (BRI = Resistance × Weight/Height2); and also, CH2 (= Capacitance × Height2) which represents total body capacitive volume in physics. We initially performed BIA for 206 female, 116 male healthy volunteers, followed by, prospective study for 128 CAPD patients (47 diabetes mellitus (DM), 81 non-DM; 59 male, 69 female) for >2 years. Results: Moderately good negative correlation of albumin and BCI (r = -0.533, p < 0.001) with linear regression (BCI = 8.780 - 0.184 × [albumin], R2 = 0.339, p < 0.001) was shown in CAPD patients. BCI and CH2 were much higher in CAPD patients in comparison to healthy volunteers (3.4 ± 0.1 vs 2.0 ± 0.0 nFm2/kg, p < 0.001 and 203 ± 8 vs 125 ± 1 nFm2, p < 0.001, respectively). In age and gender adjusted logistic regression model of 128 CAPD patients versus 322 healthy volunteers, the best risk discriminator was BCI (X2 = 165.6), followed by CH2 (X2 = 140), phase angle (X2 = 59.3) and BRI (X2 = 52.2). Thirty five (27.3%) patients died during the study period (Fatal cause: infection (54%), cardiovascular (26%)). In Cox regression, CH2 ( X24 = 32.4) was the best predictor for all-cause mortality, followed by BCI (X24 = 27.7) and phase angle ( X24 = 19.3). Conclusion: The phase angle was a

Avian Influenza: a global threat needing a global solution
GCH Koh, TY Wong, SK Cheong, DSQ Koh
Asia Pacific Family Medicine , 2008, DOI: 10.1186/1447-056x-7-5
Abstract: Since the 1700s, there have been ten to thirteen influenza outbreaks or probable pandemics, of which three have occurred since the beginning of the 20th century: the 1918–1919 Spanish flu pandemic, the 1957–1958 Asian flu pandemic and the 1968–1969 Hong Kong flu pandemic [1]. Of the three pandemics, the 1918–1919 pandemic was the most severe. The 1918–1919 strain of influenza was unusual because of the high rate of mortality among victims between the ages of 15 and 35 years. Deaths from influenza are usually due to secondary bacterial infection but many deaths during the 1918–1919 pandemic were caused directly by the virus itself. It appears that the immune system in young persons paradoxically went into over-drive while battling the influenza virus and progressed into an immunologic storm that killed the victims [2]. This was in contrast to the pandemics of 1957–1958 and 1968–1969 which were much milder. There were several reasons for this: the influenza strains were less virulent, the patterns of mortality were more typical of a usual seasonal influenza outbreak (i.e. it was concentrated among the very young and very old) and doctors were able to use antibiotics to treat secondary bacterial infections. The Attack Rate is the percentage of the population that becomes ill from an infection while case fatality rate refers to the percentage of infected people who die from the infection. Experts generally agree that the attack rates of the past 3 influenza outbreaks in the last century did not differ markedly and is estimated to be 25% to 30%. Using similar evidence, experts estimate the case fatality rate during the 1918 outbreak to be about 2.5% whereas the case fatality rates during the 1957–1958 and 1968–1969 episodes were below 0.2% [3].The genes of the influenza virus can mutate in 2 main ways: (1) antigenic drift which involves small errors being incorporated into a virus gene sequence when the virus makes copies of itself and (2) antigenic shift involving an ex
Chronic Inhibition, Self-Control and Eating Behavior: Test of a ‘Resource Depletion’ Model
Martin S. Hagger, Giulia Panetta, Chung-Ming Leung, Ging Ging Wong, John C. K. Wang, Derwin K. C. Chan, David A. Keatley, Nikos L. D. Chatzisarantis
PLOS ONE , 2013, DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0076888
Abstract: The current research tested the hypothesis that individuals engaged in long-term efforts to limit food intake (e.g., individuals with high eating restraint) would have reduced capacity to regulate eating when self-control resources are limited. In the current research, body mass index (BMI) was used as a proxy for eating restraint based on the assumption that individuals with high BMI would have elevated levels of chronic eating restraint. A preliminary study (Study 1) aimed to provide evidence for the assumed relationship between eating restraint and BMI. Participants (N = 72) categorized into high or normal-range BMI groups completed the eating restraint scale. Consistent with the hypothesis, results revealed significantly higher scores on the weight fluctuation and concern for dieting subscales of the restraint scale among participants in the high BMI group compared to the normal-range BMI group. The main study (Study 2) aimed to test the hypothesized interactive effect of BMI and diminished self-control resources on eating behavior. Participants (N = 83) classified as having high or normal-range BMI were randomly allocated to receive a challenging counting task that depleted self-control resources (ego-depletion condition) or a non-depleting control task (no depletion condition). Participants then engaged in a second task in which required tasting and rating tempting cookies and candies. Amount of food consumed during the taste-and-rate task constituted the behavioral dependent measure. Regression analyses revealed a significant interaction effect of these variables on amount of food eaten in the taste-and-rate task. Individuals with high BMI had reduced capacity to regulate eating under conditions of self-control resource depletion as predicted. The interactive effects of BMI and self-control resource depletion on eating behavior were independent of trait self-control. Results extend knowledge of the role of self-control in regulating eating behavior and provide support for a limited-resource model of self-control.
Necrotising colitis related to clozapine? A rare but life threatening side effect
Quor M Leong, Kutt S Wong, Dean C Koh
World Journal of Emergency Surgery , 2007, DOI: 10.1186/1749-7922-2-21
Abstract: Several medications are known to cause necrotizing colitis. These include chemotherapeutic agents, antibiotics and hyperosmolar laxatives [1]. On rare occasions, necrotizing colitis has been linked to phenothiazine usage [2]. This is believed to be due to the anticholinergic effects of phenothiazines, especially when used in conjunction with other psychiatric drugs. Clozapine-induced necrotizing colitis has been reported recently in the literature [3]. Although not a phenothiazine, clozapine is known to have anticholinergic activity. We report another case of clozapine-induced necrotizing colitis and consider the probable mechanisms linking proposed cause and effect.A 34 year old Chinese gentleman with a 15-year history of chronic schizophrenia was admitted to the surgical department for acute abdominal pain. He had been treated with clozapine (100 mg in the morning and 200 mg in the night), sodium valproate (400 mg three times daily), benztropine (2 mg three times daily) and diazepam (10 mg in the night) for the last 4 months.A history of abdominal pain, distension and fever for a day was elicited. This was associated with constipation over the preceding week. There were also complaints of nausea and a single episode of vomiting.Physical examination revealed a distended and mildly tender abdomen, without localizing signs. Rebound tenderness was absent and bowel sounds were sluggish. Hard faeces were noted on rectal examination. He was febrile at 38.2°C, was tachypnoeic, had a systolic BP of 100 mmHg and was clinically dehydrated.An abdominal radiograph showed large bowel dilatation affecting the entire colon. The diameter of the colon was greater than 10 cm. There was evidence of faecal loading throughout the large bowel. No dilated small bowel shadows were noted. The erect chest radiograph did not reveal any evidence of pneumoperitoneum. The blood results showed a raised total white cell count of 26.3 × 109/L (4–10 × 109/L), haemoglobin level of 15.9 g/dL (13.0–17
The effect of cotton-based collection methods on eosinophil cationic protein (ECP) concentrations detected in saliva
Teck Yee Wong,David Koh,Andrew Wee,Vivian Ng
Journal of Asthma and Allergy , 2008,
Abstract: Teck Yee Wong, David Koh, Andrew Wee, Vivian Ng, Yong Tat Koh, Zhenjie Sum, Gerald KohDepartment of Community, Occupational and Family Medicine, Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine, National University of Singapore, SingaporeBackground: Salivary eosinophil cationic protein (ECP) level has the potential to be an assessment tool for asthma. Its measurement is not well-established and needs standardization. We studied how passive drool (PD) and two commercial devices, Salivette (cotton-based device) and Sorbette (cellulose–cotton-based-device), may affect ECP levels during collection among healthy subjects.Methods: Study I (n = 10) involved direct sampling of healthy adult subjects with Salivette and Sorbette . Study II (n = 33) involved ‘indirect’ sampling of previously collected PD by both devices.Results: In study I, ECP levels were detected in all PD samples but only in three with Sorbette and none with Salivette (collection order: PD, Sorbette and Salivette ). We changed the order of collection (Salivette , Sorbette , PD) and the results were similar (ECP levels detected in all PD samples, three with Sorbette and only one with Salivette ). In study II, ECP levels in saliva collected by PD was 12.8 μg/L (median) and using Sorbette and Salivette were < 2.0 μg/L and 3.4 μg/L respectively (p < 0.01). ECP levels in PD correlated with Sorbette (rs = 0.79, p < 0.01) and Salivette (rs = 0.62, p 0.01).Conclusion: Compared to PD, saliva collected using cotton or cellulose-based collection devices resulted in lower measurable ECP levels.Keywords: salivary ECP, collection methods
The effect of cotton-based collection methods on eosinophil cationic protein (ECP) concentrations detected in saliva
Teck Yee Wong, David Koh, Andrew Wee, Vivian Ng, Yong Tat Koh, et al
Journal of Asthma and Allergy , 2008, DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/JAA.S3563
Abstract: t of cotton-based collection methods on eosinophil cationic protein (ECP) concentrations detected in saliva Original Research (4944) Total Article Views Authors: Teck Yee Wong, David Koh, Andrew Wee, Vivian Ng, Yong Tat Koh, et al Published Date November 2008 Volume 2008:1 Pages 45 - 48 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/JAA.S3563 Teck Yee Wong, David Koh, Andrew Wee, Vivian Ng, Yong Tat Koh, Zhenjie Sum, Gerald Koh Department of Community, Occupational and Family Medicine, Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine, National University of Singapore, Singapore Background: Salivary eosinophil cationic protein (ECP) level has the potential to be an assessment tool for asthma. Its measurement is not well-established and needs standardization. We studied how passive drool (PD) and two commercial devices, Salivette (cotton-based device) and Sorbette (cellulose–cotton-based-device), may affect ECP levels during collection among healthy subjects. Methods: Study I (n = 10) involved direct sampling of healthy adult subjects with Salivette and Sorbette . Study II (n = 33) involved ‘indirect’ sampling of previously collected PD by both devices. Results: In study I, ECP levels were detected in all PD samples but only in three with Sorbette and none with Salivette (collection order: PD, Sorbette and Salivette ). We changed the order of collection (Salivette , Sorbette , PD) and the results were similar (ECP levels detected in all PD samples, three with Sorbette and only one with Salivette ). In study II, ECP levels in saliva collected by PD was 12.8 μg/L (median) and using Sorbette and Salivette were < 2.0 μg/L and 3.4 μg/L respectively (p < 0.01). ECP levels in PD correlated with Sorbette (rs = 0.79, p < 0.01) and Salivette (rs = 0.62, p 0.01). Conclusion: Compared to PD, saliva collected using cotton or cellulose-based collection devices resulted in lower measurable ECP levels.
Socioeconomic profile of diabetic patients with and without foot problems
Aziz Nather,Chionh Siok Bee,Wong Keng Lin,Koh Si Qi Odelia
Diabetic Foot & Ankle , 2010, DOI: 10.3402/dfa.v1i0.5523
Abstract: Introduction: To identify the differences in a socioeconomic profile between two cohorts of diabetic patients – one with diabetic foot problems and another without diabetic foot problems. Materials and methods: The cohort with diabetic foot problems (including cellulitis, abscess, osteomyelitis, septic arthritis, gangrene, ulcers, or Charcot joint disease) consisted of 122 diabetic patients, while the other cohort without foot problems consisted of 112 diabetic patients. Both were seen at the National University Hospital from January to April 2007. A detailed protocol was designed and the factors studied included patient profile, average monthly household income, education, compliance to diabetic medication, attendance at clinics for diabetic treatment, exercise, smoking, alcohol consumption, gender, and glycosylated haemoglobin (HbA1C) level. These were studied for significant differences using univariate and stepwise multivariate logistic regression analysis. Results: With multivariate analysis, Malay ethnicity (p<0.001), education of up to secondary school only (p=0.021), low average monthly household income of less than SGD $2,000 (p=0.030), lack of exercise (at least once a week, p=0.04), and elevated HbA1C level (>7.0%; p=0.015) were found to be significantly higher in the cohort with diabetic foot problems than the cohort without. Conclusions: There are significant differences in the socioeconomic factors between diabetic patients with diabetic foot problems and those without.
Two-Way but Asymmetrical Reproductive Interference between an Invasive Veronica Species and a Native Congener  [PDF]
Koh-Ichi Takakura
American Journal of Plant Sciences (AJPS) , 2013, DOI: 10.4236/ajps.2013.43069
Abstract:

Recent studies have suggested that reproductive interference, a deleterious interspecific interaction in the mating process, plays an important role in biological invasions. In the system of plant species, however, the border with the pollen limitation has often been vague in past studies. This study, using field and laboratory experiments and field observations, examined the reproductive success of an endangered native herbaceous plant, Veronica polita lilacina, in the context of the reproductive interference by the alien congener, V. persica. The auto-pollination experiment confirmed that both species can usually produce seeds even without external conspecific pollens. Results of the artificial pollination experiment demonstrated that pollination with the heterospecific pollens significantly decreases the number of seeds in the native species, but not in the alien species. A transplant experiment revealed that the coexistence with the alien species reduced the fruiting success of the native species. Field observations have shown the interaction between two species in the native patch with only one intruding alien species. They demonstrated that native individuals placed closer to the alien individual suffered a greater decrease in fruiting success and the seed production and that the alien intruder produced no seed. These results demonstrate that species that could reproduce via the auto-pollination suffered the reproductive interference and that the native species also exert the resistive reproductive interference slightly. These interactions can explain the displacement pattern of the native species by the alien congener in Japan.

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