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Search Results: 1 - 10 of 2859 matches for " Kazuo Abe "
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Non-motor signs and symptoms in Parkinson’s disease  [PDF]
Kazuo Abe
Health (Health) , 2012, DOI: 10.4236/health.2012.431171
Abstract: Motor symptoms are cardinal clinical features of Parkinson’s disease (PD). Progress in drug therapy and rehabilitation has been presenting beneficial effect for motor symptoms. However, non-motor symptoms and signs in PD have been accumulated growing attentions and its amelioration may also give beneficial effect for PD patients’ and their care givers’ quality of life. In this mini-review, I overviewed non-motor symptoms and signs in PD.
A Patient Developed Painful Muscle Cramps due to Overeating Mangos
Kazuo Abe
Case Reports in Neurological Medicine , 2012, DOI: 10.1155/2012/742125
Abstract: A 79-year-old woman had a habit to eat a mango every night before sleep and experienced muscle cramps during sleep. Her muscle cramps may be resulted from potassium overload due to overeating mangos.
A Patient Developed Painful Muscle Cramps due to Overeating Mangos
Kazuo Abe
Case Reports in Neurological Medicine , 2012, DOI: 10.1155/2012/742125
Abstract: A 79-year-old woman had a habit to eat a mango every night before sleep and experienced muscle cramps during sleep. Her muscle cramps may be resulted from potassium overload due to overeating mangos. 1. Introduction Mangiferin is a polyphenolic compound abundant in the stem bark of Mangifera indica (mango) with antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties in different experimental settings [1]. These experimental settings reports have attracted popular interesting and many tend to eat more mangos to prevent ischemic heart and brain diseases. However, overeating mango may not be good for health. We experienced a woman developing every night muscle cramps after overeating mangos. 2. Case Report A 79-year-old woman presented with everyday history of muscle cramps and parenthesis during sleep. She reported receiving no medications and specifically reported not using thiazide diuretics before these episodes. She had a blood pressure of 120/64?mm Hg, a respiratory rate of 19 breaths per minute. On admission in the morning, laboratory investigation revealed a serum calcium level of 2.5?mmol per liter (normal range, from 2.2 to 2.6), a potassium level of 5.5?mmol per liter (normal range, from 3.5 to 5.0), and a magnesium level of 0.9?mmol per liter (normal range, from 0.8 to 1.2). On inquiring, she advised us that she had eaten a mango every night from a month before for good sleep. A diagnosis of muscle cramps due to hyperpotassium was made. She stopped eating mango fruits and showed normal potassium level of 4.8?mmol per liter on the next admission. She had not experienced muscle cramps since then. 3. Discussion Mango becomes popular food because of its effect for decrement of inflammation and of oxidative damage and is a potassium rich food with 170?mg potassium per 100?g weight. Potassium is one of the most important micronutrients required by the human body. It serves various functions including firing of neurons, maintenance of heart rhythm to the contraction of muscles. However, overeating of mangoes may result in excessive levels of potassium and develop hyperkalemia. Hyperkalemia has been known in patients with renal failure and luxury potassium uptake. Hyperkalemia is also known to develop painful muscle cramps. A painful muscle cramp is an involuntarily and forcibly contracted muscle that does not relax. When we use the muscles that can be controlled voluntarily, such as those of our arms and legs, they alternately contract and relax as we move our limbs [2]. A muscle that involuntarily contracts is in a spasm. If the spasm is forceful and sustained,
Measurement of the Angle $φ_1(β)$ and $B \bar B$ Mixing (Recent Results from BaBar and Belle)
Kazuo Abe
Physics , 2003,
Abstract: Recent results from BaBar and Belle experiments on $B \bar B$ mixing and $\sin 2\phi_1$ are presented. Accuracy of $\Delta m_d$ measurements has reached 1.2%. Higher order effects within the Standard Model or possible new physics effect that might appear in the $B \bar B$ mixing through non-zero $\Delta \Gamma/\Gamma$, CP violation, or $CPT$ violation have been explored. The BaBar and Belle results on $\sin 2\phi_1$ from the $b \to c \bar{c} s$ modes are in good agreement with each other and a combined result with an accuracy of 8% is in good agreement with a global CKM fit. A simple average of the $\sin 2\phi_1$ values that were measured in the penguin-loop dominated decay modes, $\phi K_S$, $\eta^{\prime} K_S$, and $K^+ K^- K_S$, shows about 2.5$\sigma$ deviation from the Standard Model.
Safety and Efficacy of a Transdermal Rotigotine for the Treatment of Fatigue and Quality of Life in Patients with Parkinson’s Disease  [PDF]
Kazuo Abe, Masashi Fujita, Hiroo Yoshikawa
Advances in Parkinson's Disease (APD) , 2015, DOI: 10.4236/apd.2015.44009
Abstract: Aim: To evaluate safety and efficacy of a transdermal rotigotine for the treatment of fatigue and quality of life (QOL) in patients with Parkinson’s disease (PD). This was a multi-sites open-label study of 58 PD patients (male 26, female 32) who met a Japanese PD diagnosis criterion. They received a transdermal rotigotine 4.5 mg/day for 8 weeks. We added a rotigotine on the previous anti-Parkinson’s drugs. Clinical signs were evaluated by Hoehn-Yahr (H-Y) stage, unified Parkinson’s disease rating scale (UPDRS), fatigue severity scale (FSS), and Euro quality of life (QOL). The scores of UPDRS improved from 35.2 ± 8.0 (mean ± SD) to 31.8 ± 8.3 (P = 0.14). There was no significant improvement or worsening of the H-Y stages. The scores of FSS improved from 57.3 ± 12.7 (mean ± SD) to 50.1 ± 11.8 (P = 0.061). The scores of QOL improved from 38.1 ± 11.1 to 48.3 ± 10.0 (P = 0.068). Our data demonstrate that, in a small sample size, administration of a transdermal rotigotine was associated with few side effects and was modestly effective for the treatment of fatigue and QOL in patients with PD.
Effectiveness of Istradefylline for Fatigue and Quality of Life in Parkinson’s Disease Patients’ and of Their Caregivers’  [PDF]
Kazuo Abe, Masashi Fujita, Hiroo Yoshikawa
Advances in Parkinson's Disease (APD) , 2016, DOI: 10.4236/apd.2016.52004
Abstract: Objectives: We evaluated efficacy and safety of istradefylline that is the first selective adenosine A2A receptor antagonist, for the treatment of non-motor symptoms and quality of life (QoL) in Parkinson’s disease (PD) patients with and QoL in their caregivers. Methods: This was a multisites study of 40 PD patients (female 24, male 16) who fully filled UK PD society brain bank clinical diagnostic criteria. They received istradefylline 20 mg/day for 8 weeks. We added istradefylline on the previous anti-Parkinson’s drugs. Clinical severities were evaluated by Hoehn-Yahr (H-Y) stage, unified PD rating scale (UPDRS), non-motor symptoms in PD (NMSPD), fatigue severity scale (FSS) and Euro QoL. Also, we evaluated their caregiver’s QoL by Euro QoL. Results: The scores of UPDRS part I improved from 1.3 ± 1.1 to 06 ± 0.9 (P = 0.18), part II improved from 11.9 ± 3.2 to 11.0 ± 3.1 (P = 0.17), part III improved from 34.8 ± 7.2 to 32.1 ± 8.3 (P = 0.105). There was no significant improvement or worsening of the H-Y stages. The scores of NMSPD improved from 49.9 ± 11.2 to 43.9 ± 10.6 (P = 0.08). The scores of FSS improved from 62.8 ± 7.1 to 52.3 ± 9.3 (P = 0.049). The total scores of Euro QoL in PD patients improved from 48.8 ± 14.9 to 57.2 ± 13.0 (P = 0.045). The total scores of Euro QoL in patients’ caregivers improved from 54.2 ± 11.0 to 59.8 ± 10.9 (P = 0.046). Conclusions: Our data demonstrated that istradefylline was associated with few side effects and was modestly effective for the treatment of non-motor symptoms especially fatigue that might improve QoL in PD patients as well as in their caregivers’.
Right prefrontal cortex is activated for perceiving postural limits: a functional near-infrared spectroscopy study  [PDF]
Noriyuki Kamata, Yoshimi Matsuo, Ayako Matsuya, Satoru Inoue, Kazuo Abe
Health (Health) , 2009, DOI: 10.4236/health.2009.13039
Abstract: The purpose of this study was to investigate neuronal mechanisms active during the percep-tion of forward postural limits in a standing po-sition and to specify fall-related brain activity using optical functional near-infrared spectros-copy. The study group included six right-handed, healthy female volunteers (range: 19, 20 years). The optical imaging device comprised 16 opto-des designed to provide 24-channel recording of changes in hemoglobin oxygenation. We meas-ured the changes of oxygenated hemoglobin levels in the frontal region when subjects per-ceived reachability in a standing position. Com- pared with those in other regions, the oxygen-ated hemoglobin levels in the right frontal region compatible with the right prefrontal cortex sig-nificantly increased. This result suggests that brain activities in the right prefrontal cortex are related to perception of reachability. Overesti-mation of postural limits has been reported as one of the risk factor for falling. This overesti-mation might be induced by dysfunction in the prefrontal cortex, resulting in a failure to inhibit a motor program that would have caused a loss of balance in reaching. Activation of the right prefrontal cortex may be a key factor for pre-venting accidental falls in the elderly and in pa-tients with neurological disorders.
Camptocormia in Parkinson's Disease
Kazuo Abe,Yutaka Uchida,Masaru Notani
Parkinson's Disease , 2010, DOI: 10.4061/2010/267640
Abstract: Objectives. Abnormalities of posture represent one of the main features of Parkinson's disease (PD). Among them, camptocormia has been considered as rare in PD. We investigated frequency and clinical features of camptocormia in PD patients. Methods. 153 PD patients (mean 6 8 . 5 ± 1 0 . 7 years old, duration 5 . 9 ± 2 . 4 years) outpatiently recruited. After neurologic examination, patients were rated on the Unified PD Rating Scale motor scale (UPDRS Part III), minimental state examination (MMSE). Also we evaluated patients with camptocormia by MRI. Of the 153 PD patients, 27 had camptocormia (mean age, 6 7 . 9 ± 7 . 9 years old; disease duration, 6 . 1 ± 3 . 9 years). For further evaluation, we recruited age- and sex-matched 27 PD patients without camptocormia (11 men and 16 women; mean age ± S D , 6 9 . 2 ± 1 0 . 1 years, duration 6 . 0 ± 2 . 7 years) These selected 54 patients completed several self-assessments. Lumbar and thoracic paraspinal muscles were studied by EMG. Results. There were no significant differences in age, duration, severity, and drug dose between patients with and without camptocormia. Analysis of NMSS subitems indicated that PD patients tended to show lower scores for sleep/fatigue, attention/memory, and miscellaneous items. Conclusions. We found significant differences concerning nonmotor signs and symptoms evaluated by FAB, PDQ-8, FSQ, VAS-F, and NMSS between patients with and without camptocormia. Our findings indicate that camptocormia is a relatively common sign in PD and that patients with camptocormia scores on the PDQ-8 compared with PD patients without camptocormia. This suggests that improvements in camptocormia of PD patients may improve their QOL. 1. Introduction Parkinson’s disease (PD) may involve skeletal abnormalities including extreme neck flexion (“dropped head") and truncal flexion (camptocormia) [1]. Camptocormia in PD is defined by marked anteroflexion of the trunk, which abates in the recumbent position, with no or minimal response to levodopa [1–4]. The condition is exacerbated by walking and is relieved by sitting, lying in the supine position or by volitionally extending the trunk when the patient leans against a wall or a table. Although early reports often attributed camptocormia to a conversion disorder, it is now accepted as an axial feature of Parkinson’s disease [5–7]. However, previous studies found no differences between the parkinsonian clinical signs of PD patients with and without camptocormia, but Bloch et al. and Tiple et al. reported that there were differences in terms of disease duration
A brainstem anosognosia of hemiparesis
Kazuo Abe,Yutaka Uchida,Kiyoka Yamamoto
Neurology International , 2009, DOI: 10.4081/ni.2009.e14
Abstract: A woman had anosognosia for hemiplegia as a manifestation of brainstem infarction. She had no mental or neuropsychological disturbances, and had involvement of the brainstem in the frontal/parietal-subcortical circuits to the right cerebral hemisphere. Brainstem lesions that disrupt frontal/parietal-subcortical areas may affect anosognosia for hemiplegia.
Endothelial Progenitor Cells Promote Directional Three-Dimensional Endothelial Network Formation by Secreting Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor
Yoshinori Abe, Yoshiyuki Ozaki, Junichi Kasuya, Kimiko Yamamoto, Joji Ando, Ryo Sudo, Mariko Ikeda, Kazuo Tanishita
PLOS ONE , 2013, DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0082085
Abstract: Endothelial progenitor cell (EPC) transplantation induces the formation of new blood-vessel networks to supply nutrients and oxygen, and is feasible for the treatment of ischemia and cardiovascular diseases. However, the role of EPCs as a source of proangiogenic cytokines and consequent generators of an extracellular growth factor microenvironment in three-dimensional (3D) microvessel formation is not fully understood. We focused on the contribution of EPCs as a source of proangiogenic cytokines on 3D microvessel formation using an in vitro 3D network model. To create a 3D network model, EPCs isolated from rat bone marrow were sandwiched with double layers of collagen gel. Endothelial cells (ECs) were then cultured on top of the upper collagen gel layer. Quantitative analyses of EC network formation revealed that the length, number, and depth of the EC networks were significantly enhanced in a 3D model with ECs and EPCs compared to an EC monoculture. In addition, conditioned medium (CM) from the 3D model with ECs and EPCs promoted network formation compared to CM from an EC monoculture. We also confirmed that EPCs secreted vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). However, networks cultured with the CM were shallow and did not penetrate the collagen gel in great depth. Therefore, we conclude that EPCs contribute to 3D network formation at least through indirect incorporation by generating a local VEGF gradient. These results suggest that the location of EPCs is important for controlling directional 3D network formation in the field of tissue engineering.
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