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Search Results: 1 - 10 of 645 matches for " Kahn DG "
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Characterization and evolution of dermal filaments from patients with Morgellons disease
Middelveen MJ, Mayne PJ, Kahn DG, Stricker RB
Clinical, Cosmetic and Investigational Dermatology , 2013, DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/CCID.S39017
Abstract: racterization and evolution of dermal filaments from patients with Morgellons disease Original Research (6113) Total Article Views Authors: Middelveen MJ, Mayne PJ, Kahn DG, Stricker RB Video abstract presented by Raphael B Stricker Views: 1031 Published Date January 2013 Volume 2013:6 Pages 1 - 21 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/CCID.S39017 Received: 10 October 2012 Accepted: 28 November 2012 Published: 08 January 2013 Marianne J Middelveen,1 Peter J Mayne,1 Douglas G Kahn,2 Raphael B Stricker1 1International Lyme and Associated Diseases Society, Bethesda, MD, USA; 2Department of Pathology, Olive View–UCLA Medical Center, Sylmar, CA, USA Abstract: Morgellons disease is an emerging skin disease characterized by formation of dermal filaments associated with multisystemic symptoms and tick-borne illness. Some clinicians hypothesize that these often colorful dermal filaments are textile fibers, either self-implanted by patients or accidentally adhering to lesions, and conclude that patients with this disease have delusions of infestation. We present histological observations and electron microscopic imaging from representative Morgellons disease samples revealing that dermal filaments in these cases are keratin and collagen in composition and result from proliferation and activation of keratinocytes and fibroblasts in the epidermis. Spirochetes were detected in the dermatological specimens from our study patients, providing evidence that Morgellons disease is associated with an infectious process.
Characterization and evolution of dermal filaments from patients with Morgellons disease
Middelveen MJ,Mayne PJ,Kahn DG,Stricker RB
Clinical, Cosmetic and Investigational Dermatology , 2013,
Abstract: Marianne J Middelveen,1 Peter J Mayne,1 Douglas G Kahn,2 Raphael B Stricker11International Lyme and Associated Diseases Society, Bethesda, MD, USA; 2Department of Pathology, Olive View–UCLA Medical Center, Sylmar, CA, USAAbstract: Morgellons disease is an emerging skin disease characterized by formation of dermal filaments associated with multisystemic symptoms and tick-borne illness. Some clinicians hypothesize that these often colorful dermal filaments are textile fibers, either self-implanted by patients or accidentally adhering to lesions, and conclude that patients with this disease have delusions of infestation. We present histological observations and electron microscopic imaging from representative Morgellons disease samples revealing that dermal filaments in these cases are keratin and collagen in composition and result from proliferation and activation of keratinocytes and fibroblasts in the epidermis. Spirochetes were detected in the dermatological specimens from our study patients, providing evidence that Morgellons disease is associated with an infectious process.Keywords: Morgellons disease, digital dermatitis, Lyme disease, Borrelia burgdorferi, spirochetes, keratin, keratinocytes, collagen, fibroblasts
Septic Loosening of a Total Hip Replacement: Case Report
DG Kinyanjui
East African Orthopaedic Journal , 2007,
Abstract: It can be difficult to differentiate septic from aseptic loosening of prosthesis and especially those due to delayed and late prosthetic-joint infection. In delayed and late prosthetic-joint infection, the acute signs and symptoms of infection such as fever, swelling, erythema and warmth are usually absent and the only manifestation may be implant loosening, persistent joint pain or both; same as aseptic loosening. The patient presented is a 62-year- old farmer who presented with implant loosening and with subtle clinical features that could not help differentiate septic from aseptic loosening. The diagnostic challenges faced and investigations that proved useful to differentiate septic from aseptic loosening are presented.
A comparison of the kinetics of mango drying in open-air, solar, and forced-air dryers
DG Mercer
African Journal of Food, Agriculture, Nutrition and Development , 2012,
Abstract: Mangoes are under-utilized fruits that grow naturally in many sub-Saharan African countries. At the present time most mangoes are sold fresh in local markets. There is little done to preserve them for use during the off-season. Drying is one way in which the economic potential of mangoes could be exploited. This study was undertaken to investigate and compare the kinetics of mango drying using three basic drying methods: open-air drying on wire mesh racks; solar drying in a prototype dryer equipped with solar-powered exhaust fans; and forced-air drying in an Armfield Model UOP8 laboratory-scale tray dryer. Results could then be used to determine appropriate drying techniques for mango processing in sub-Saharan Africa on both local and commercial scales. Of these methods, forced air drying was found to provide the best overall results, based on water removal rates and general control over the drying process. Solar drying, while viewed as a promising technology for application in developing countries, was considerably slower than forced- air drying and is severely restricted by climatic conditions. A similar situation was observed for open-air drying, which was the slowest drying method of the three. Based upon mathematical models developed for each drying method, 11.6 hours was predicted as being required for mangoes in the forced-air dryer to a final moisture content of 10% (wet basis). Sixteen (16) hours and 24 hours of exposure to appropriate drying conditions were predicted as being required for solar drying and open-air drying, respectively. This could take three or four days to achieve under actual operating conditions. These times were supported by experimentally determined values. The impact of air temperature and linear air velocity on the drying kinetics of sliced mangoes were also investigated using the forced-air dryer. A linear velocity of 0.5 m/s was found to be sufficient for satisfactory drying of the mango slices when combined with an air temperature in the range of 50 C to 60 C. It is recommended that forced-air drying be utilized whenever possible for the drying of mango slices for both food safety and food quality reasons.
The centrality of the dead human body for teaching and research – social, cultural and ethical issues
DG Jones
South African Journal of Bioethics and Law , 2011,
Abstract: Study of the cadaver is integral to both medical education and research, but how is cadaveric material to be obtained in the 21st-century world? Historical precedents are of little assistance, built as they are on the most unethical of practices, including body snatching and murder. This constitutes a major challenge for modern anatomy: has it been able to cast off all semblance of this unsavoury past? In this paper it is contended that the continued use of unclaimed bodies has proved problematic, ignoring as it does the fundamental ethical impetus of altruism. The use of bequeathed bodies is regarded as ethically preferable, even though cultural practices vary significantly, with the result that the availability of cadavers is uneven across societies. Recent legislation has brought the role of informed consent to the fore, and this is a welcome development. Nevertheless, immense challenges remain for anatomists, a major one being that posed by the large-scale public exhibitions of plastinated bodies, the prime exponent of which is Body Worlds. In assessing the manner in which the plastinates are displayed, those with Renaissance allusions have most in common with an educational rationale, although lacking a research ethos. The contemporary genre plastinates are the furthest removed from any traditional anatomical approach, and generally lack any teaching focus. They are also the most problematic ethically when assessed in terms of the principles of beneficence and non-maleficence. Additionally, the character of donation is changed within the context of these public exhibitions.
Etude comparative des coagulations du lait par actions de l'extrait des écorces de l'Ongokea gore et des enzymes coagulants bien connus
Libouga, DG.
Tropicultura , 2008,
Abstract: Milk Clotting Using Ongokea gore Bark Extract Compared to those Obtained to Well Known Milk Clotting Extracts. The evolution of firmness in curd obtained using plant extract (Ongokea gore barks) and that using renounce coagulating enzymes (bovine pepsin, Endothia parasitica, porcine pepsin, Mucor pusillis, rennet) were compared. The study was carried out using reconstituted milk (Berrigde substrate) and a formagraph was used for the analysis of curd firmness. Variations in amplitude of the formagrammes were measured with time. It was noticed that at the same coagulation time, the curd firming rate of Ongokea gore extracts was higher than that of porcine pepsin but lower than those of Endothia parasitica, Mucor pusillis, bovine pepsin and rennet. The evolution of curd firmness with pH on one hand and the quantity of dissolved powder milk on the other hand showed some similarities in rennet and Ongokea gore extract curds: the effect of the pH of the milk substrate is less remarkable on the rate of curd firmness while this rate increases with the quantity of dissolved powder milk.
Modelling evolution on design-by-contract predicts an origin of Life through an abiotic double-stranded RNA world
Albert DG de Roos
Biology Direct , 2007, DOI: 10.1186/1745-6150-2-12
Abstract: By modeling early genome evolution on the engineering paradigm design-by-contract, an alternative scenario is presented in which life started with the appearance of double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) as an informational storage molecule while catalytic single-stranded RNA was derived from this dsRNA template later in evolution.It was investigated whether this scenario could be implemented mechanistically by starting with abiotic processes. Double-stranded RNA could be formed abiotically by hybridization of oligoribonucleotides that are subsequently non-enzymatically ligated into a double-stranded chain. Thermal cycling driven by the diurnal temperature cycles could then replicate this dsRNA when strands of dsRNA separate and later rehybridize and ligate to reform dsRNA. A temperature-dependent partial replication of specific regions of dsRNA could produce the first template-based generation of catalytic ssRNA, similar to the developmental gene transcription process. Replacement of these abiotic processes by enzymatic processes would guarantee functional continuity. Further transition from a dsRNA to a dsDNA world could be based on minor mutations in template and substrate recognition sites of an RNA polymerase and would leave all existing processes intact.Modeling evolution on a design pattern, the 'dsRNA first' hypothesis can provide an alternative mechanistic evolutionary scenario for the origin of our genome that preserves functional continuity.This article was reviewed by Anthony Poole, Eugene Koonin and Eugene ShakhnovichThe evolution of life and the origins of DNA and RNA as the carriers of information are still a mystery. It has been proposed that the DNA world was preceded by an RNA world in which RNA fulfilled a role both as the information carrier and as the catalyst of early chemical processes [1,2]. The general idea is that from a pool of random strings of RNA, ribozymes would emerge with a primitive RNA polymerase activity and, in this way, RNA could provide i
Conserved intron positions in ancient protein modules
Albert DG de Roos
Biology Direct , 2007, DOI: 10.1186/1745-6150-2-7
Abstract: A set of conserved intron positions was found by matching identical splice sites sequences from distantly-related eukaryotic kingdoms. Most amino acid sequences with conserved introns were homologous to consensus sequences of functional domains from conserved proteins including kinases, phosphatases, small GTPases, transporters and matrix proteins. These included ancient proteins that originated before the eukaryote-prokaryote split, for instance the catalytic domain of protein phosphatase 2A where a total of eleven conserved introns were found. Using an experimental setup in which the relation between a splice site and the ancientness of its surrounding sequence could be studied, it was found that the presence of an intron was positively correlated to the ancientness of its surrounding sequence. Intron phase conservation was linked to the conservation of the gene sequence and not to the splice site sequence itself. However, no apparent differences in phase distribution were found between introns in conserved versus non-conserved sequences.The data confirm an origin of introns deep in the eukaryotic branch and is in concordance with the presence of introns in the first functional protein modules in an 'Exon theory of genes' scenario. A model is proposed in which shuffling of primordial short exonic sequences led to the formation of the first functional protein modules, in line with hypotheses that see the formation of introns integral to the origins of genome evolution.This article was reviewed by Scott Roy (nominated by Anthony Poole), Sandro de Souza (nominated by Manyuan Long), and Gáspár Jékely.The question about the origin of introns is fundamental for an understanding of the evolution of the genome. Historically, there have been two opposite camps that try to explain the origin of introns (see [1-4]). The 'introns early' school stated that introns arose in ancient genes and were subsequently lost in prokaryotes [5,6], while the 'introns late theory' maintained
Evaluación Mediante Dosimetría Tld de las Dosis de Radiación en los Exámenes Radiológicos de Tórax
Hahn Mendoza,DG;
Revista de la Facultad de Medicina , 2000,
Abstract: in two hospital centers the evaluations of the dose in the routine chest radiography for adults were made with low potential of the x-ray tube (60kv-70kv). for the reductión of the dose it is proposed to use the technique of high potencials (?100kv). the average dose received was compaired with the reference values. as a result, the measurments of the low kv were above them in one of the centers (0,52mgy ± 10%) and in other one al the limit, (0,29mgy ± 21%). with the technique of high kv the dose diminished to the values of 0,17mgy ± 15% and 0,09mgy ± 11%, representing 69% and 67% of reduction. at a third center (pediatric radiology) the dose produced were 0,30mgy ± 18% (0 to 1,5 years) and 0,19mgy ± 19% (1,5 to 3 years) low potencial (360kv). for the high potentials (390kv), the doses were of 0,15mgy ± 18% and 0,11mgy ± 18%, obtaing a reduction of the dose of 42% and 48%. the applied thermoluminescent dosimetry for the study was investigated before the measurments. the high kv technique does not influenced the quality of the diagnostic image.
Inequalities in selected health-related Millennium Development Goals indicators in all WHO Member States
DG Kirigia, JM Kirigia
African Journal of Health Sciences , 2007,
Abstract: The objective of this study was to quantify inequalities in selected Millennium Development Goal (MDG) indicators in all the 192 WHO Member States using descriptive statistics, the Gini coefficient and the Theil coefficient. The data on all the indicators were obtained from The World Health Report 2004. The main findings were as follows: (i) generally, all the MDG indicators are significantly worse in low-income countries than in the other three income groupings; (ii) for all the MDG indicators, there are inequalities within individual countries, within the four income groups, and across income groups of countries; (iii) the inequalities in the MDG indicators are higher among the low-income countries than in high-income countries; and (iv) the ranking of income groups, by various indicators, is fairly stable whether one employs the Gini coefficient or Theil coefficient. As Member States strive to expand the effective coverage of strategies and interventions (including health promotion, primary and secondary prevention, treatment, and care) geared at reducing child mortality; improving maternal health; combating HIV/AIDS, malaria and TB; and ensuring environmental sustainability (through reduction in the use of solid fuels and expansion in access to improved water and sanitation), it is vitally important to ensure that they are implemented in a manner that redresses the inequalities in various MDG indicators. Thus, it is vital for countries to systematically monitor not only the changes in various MDG indicators but also the inequalities across the various income quintiles. In addition, at the regional and global levels, it is necessary to set up mechanisms for rigorous monitoring of the inequalities in the MDG indicators across the income groups of countries. The lessons learnt from the monitoring processes should inform the design and targeting of the various MDG-related policies, strategies and interventions with a view to eradicating the inequalities. African Journal of Health Sciences Vol. 14 (3-4) 2007: pp. 171-186
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