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Search Results: 1 - 10 of 138756 matches for " K. Gawedzki "
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Assessing Anthracene and Arsenic Contamination within Buffalo River Sediments
Adrian Gawedzki,K. Wayne Forsythe
International Journal of Ecology , 2012, DOI: 10.1155/2012/496740
Abstract: Anthracene and arsenic contamination concentrations at various depths in the Buffalo River were analyzed in this study. Anthracene is known to cause damage to human skin and arsenic has been linked to lung and liver cancer. The Buffalo River is labelled as an Area of Concern defined by the Great Lakes Water Quality Agreement between Canada and the United States. It has a long history of industrial activity located in its near vicinity that has contributed to its pollution. An ordinary kriging spatial interpolation technique was used to calculate estimates between sample locations for anthracene and arsenic at various depths. The results show that both anthracene and arsenic surface sediment (0–30 cm) is less contaminated than all subsurface depths. There is variability of pollution within the different subsurface levels (30–60 cm, 60–90 cm, 90–120 cm, 120–150 cm) and along the river course, but major clusters are identified throughout all depths for both anthracene and arsenic.
Assessing Anthracene and Arsenic Contamination within Buffalo River Sediments
Adrian Gawedzki,K. Wayne Forsythe
International Journal of Ecology , 2012, DOI: 10.1155/2012/496740
Abstract: Anthracene and arsenic contamination concentrations at various depths in the Buffalo River were analyzed in this study. Anthracene is known to cause damage to human skin and arsenic has been linked to lung and liver cancer. The Buffalo River is labelled as an Area of Concern defined by the Great Lakes Water Quality Agreement between Canada and the United States. It has a long history of industrial activity located in its near vicinity that has contributed to its pollution. An ordinary kriging spatial interpolation technique was used to calculate estimates between sample locations for anthracene and arsenic at various depths. The results show that both anthracene and arsenic surface sediment (0–30?cm) is less contaminated than all subsurface depths. There is variability of pollution within the different subsurface levels (30–60?cm, 60–90?cm, 90–120?cm, 120–150?cm) and along the river course, but major clusters are identified throughout all depths for both anthracene and arsenic. 1. Introduction The Buffalo River is labelled as an Area of Concern (AOC) defined by the Great Lakes Water Quality Agreement between Canada and the United States and will experience a proposed $39 million cleanup [1]. Both private and public investors are part of this major cleanup effort that is set to begin in the spring of 2011. The major contributors to the cleanup effort include the United States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA), the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (NYSDEC), the United States Army Corps of Engineers (USACE), and the Buffalo Niagara Riverkeeper (BNRK). The plan outlines the removal of almost a million cubic yards of contaminated sediment through a dredging process [1]. Both anthracene and arsenic have health concerns associated with them so it is not ideal to have large clusters of contamination within the rivers sediment. Anthracene is a polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) and arsenic is a metalloid. Both contaminants were analyzed to better depict the true contamination within Buffalo River sediments. Anthracene generally enters a person’s body through breathing contaminated air; however, one can be exposed to it by eating or drinking food and water that is contaminated. Degradation of benthos, loss of fish and wildlife habitat, and health concerns related to consumption of the river’s carp are some of the concerns related to the contamination of the Buffalo River [2]. Once in your body, anthracene can target fat tissues or organs including the kidneys and liver [3]. Djomo et al. [4] conducted a controlled experiment with
KAM Theorem and Quantum Field Theory
J. Bricmont,K. Gawedzki,A. Kupiainen
Physics , 1998, DOI: 10.1007/s002200050573
Abstract: We give a new proof of the KAM theorem for analytic Hamiltonians. The proof is inspired by a quantum field theory formulation of the problem and is based on a renormalization group argument treating the small denominators inductively scale by scale. The crucial cancellations of resonances are shown to follow from the Ward identities expressing the translation invariance of the corresponding field theory.
Particles and fields in fluid turbulence
G. Falkovich,K. Gawedzki,M. Vergassola
Physics , 2001, DOI: 10.1103/RevModPhys.73.913
Abstract: The understanding of fluid turbulence has considerably progressed in recent years. The application of the methods of statistical mechanics to the description of the motion of fluid particles, i.e. to the Lagrangian dynamics, has led to a new quantitative theory of intermittency in turbulent transport. The first analytical description of anomalous scaling laws in turbulence has been obtained. The underlying physical mechanism reveals the role of statistical integrals of motion in non-equilibrium systems. For turbulent transport, the statistical conservation laws are hidden in the evolution of groups of fluid particles and arise from the competition between the expansion of a group and the change of its geometry. By breaking the scale-invariance symmetry, the statistically conserved quantities lead to the observed anomalous scaling of transported fields. Lagrangian methods also shed new light on some practical issues, such as mixing and turbulent magnetic dynamo.
SU(2) WZNW Model at Higher Genera from Gauge Field Functional Integral
Krzysztof Gawedzki
Physics , 1993,
Abstract: We compute the gauge field functional integral giving the scalar product of the SU(2) Chern-Simons theory states on a Riemann surface of genus > 1. The result allows to express the higher genera partition functions of the SU(2) WZNW conformal field theory by explicit finite dimensional integrals. Our calculation may also shed new light on the functional integral of the Liouville theory.
Conformal field theory: a case study
Krzysztof Gawedzki
Physics , 1999,
Abstract: This is a set of introductory lecture notes devoted to the Wess-Zumino-Witten model of two-dimensional conformal field theory. We review the construction of the exact solution of the model from the functional integral point of view. The boundary version of the theory is also briefly discussed.
Coulomb Gas Representation of the SU(2) WZW Correlators at Higher Genera
Krzysztof Gawedzki
Physics , 1994, DOI: 10.1007/BF00749687
Abstract: We express the correlation functions of the SU(2) WZW conformal field theory on Riemann surfaces of genus >1 by finite dimensional integrals.
Turbulence under a magnifying glass
Krzysztof Gawedzki
Physics , 1996,
Abstract: This is an introductory course on the open problems in the theory of fully developed turbulence. It discusses: 1. hydrodynamical equations, 2. existence of solutions, 3. statistical description of turbulent flows, 4. Kolmogorov scaling theory, 5. functional approach to turbulence: similarities and differences with field theory, 6. breakdown of the Kolmogorov theory in a passive scalar model, 7. inverse renormalization group.
SU(2) WZW Theory at Higher Genera
Krzysztof Gawedzki
Physics , 1994, DOI: 10.1007/BF02099476
Abstract: We compute, by free field techniques, the scalar product of the SU(2) Chern-Simons states on genus > 1 surfaces. The result is a finite-dimensional integral over positions of ``screening charges'' and one complex modular parameter. It uses an effective description of the CS states closely related to the one worked out by Bertram. The scalar product formula allows to express the higher genus partition functions of the WZW conformal field theory by finite-dimensional integrals. It should provide the hermitian metric preserved by the Knizhnik-Zamolodchikov-Bernard connection describing the variations of the CS states under the change of the complex structure of the surface.
Non-Compact WZW Conformal Field Theories
Krzysztof Gawedzki
Physics , 1991,
Abstract: We discuss non-compact WZW sigma models, especially the ones with symmetric space $H^{\bf C}/H$ as the target, for $H$ a compact Lie group. They offer examples of non-rational conformal field theories. We remind their relation to the compact WZW models but stress their distinctive features like the continuous spectrum of conformal weights, diverging partition functions and the presence of two types of operators analogous to the local and non-local insertions recently discussed in the Liouville theory. Gauging non-compact abelian subgroups of $H^{\bf C}$ leads to non-rational coset theories. In particular, gauging one-parameter boosts in the $SL(2,\bC)/SU(2)$ model gives an alternative, explicitly stable construction of a conformal sigma model with the euclidean 2D black hole target. We compute the (regularized) toroidal partition function and discuss the spectrum of the theory. A comparison is made with more standard approach based on the $U(1)$ coset of the $SU(1,1)$ WZW theory where stability is not evident but where unitarity becomes more transparent.
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