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Search Results: 1 - 10 of 138825 matches for " K. Biery "
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Digital Genome-Wide ncRNA Expression, Including SnoRNAs, across 11 Human Tissues Using PolyA-Neutral Amplification
John C. Castle,Christopher D. Armour,Martin L?wer,David Haynor,Matthew Biery,Heather Bouzek,Ronghua Chen,Stuart Jackson,Jason M. Johnson,Carol A. Rohl,Christopher K. Raymond
PLOS ONE , 2012, DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0011779
Abstract: Non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) are an essential class of molecular species that have been difficult to monitor on high throughput platforms due to frequent lack of polyadenylation. Using a polyadenylation-neutral amplification protocol and next-generation sequencing, we explore ncRNA expression in eleven human tissues. ncRNAs 7SL, U2, 7SK, and HBII-52 are expressed at levels far exceeding mRNAs. C/D and H/ACA box snoRNAs are associated with rRNA methylation and pseudouridylation, respectively: spleen expresses both, hypothalamus expresses mainly C/D box snoRNAs, and testes show enriched expression of both H/ACA box snoRNAs and RNA telomerase TERC. Within the snoRNA 14q cluster, 14q(I-6) is expressed at much higher levels than other cluster members. More reads align to mitochondrial than nuclear tRNAs. Many lincRNAs are actively transcribed, particularly those overlapping known ncRNAs. Within the Prader-Willi syndrome loci, the snoRNA HBII-85 (group I) cluster is highly expressed in hypothalamus, greater than in other tissues and greater than group II or III. Additionally, within the disease locus we find novel transcription across a 400,000 nt span in ovaries. This genome-wide polyA-neutral expression compendium demonstrates the richness of ncRNA expression, their high expression patterns, their function-specific expression patterns, and is publicly available.
DNA copy number, including telomeres and mitochondria, assayed using next-generation sequencing
John C Castle, Matthew Biery, Heather Bouzek, Tao Xie, Ronghua Chen, Kira Misura, Stuart Jackson, Christopher D Armour, Jason M Johnson, Carol A Rohl, Christopher K Raymond
BMC Genomics , 2010, DOI: 10.1186/1471-2164-11-244
Abstract: We developed a sequencing-based assay of nuclear, mitochondrial, and telomeric DNA copy number that draws on the unbiased nature of next-generation sequencing and incorporates techniques developed for RNA expression profiling. To demonstrate this platform, we assayed UMC-11 cells using 5 million 33 nt reads and found tremendous copy number variation, including regions of single and homogeneous deletions and amplifications to 29 copies; 5 times more mitochondria and 4 times less telomeric sequence than a pool of non-diseased, blood-derived DNA; and that UMC-11 was derived from a male individual.The described assay outputs absolute copy number, outputs an error estimate (p-value), and is more accurate than array-based platforms at high copy number. The platform enables profiling of mitochondrial levels and telomeric length. The assay is lab-automatable and has a genomic resolution and cost that are tunable based on the number of sequence reads.DNA copy number variations occur within populations and aberrations can cause tumors, be used for drug target identification, and be used as biomarkers of tumor drug response. EGFR (epidermal growth factor receptor) amplification, for instance, is a marker for gefitinib treatment [1] and TYMS (thymidylate synthase) amplification conveys 5-fluorouracil resistance in colon tumors [2].The next-generation sequence enables generation of millions of short sequence tags in a single experiment. Using DNA as an input, the technology has been used to resequence entire genomes, including from normal individuals [3] and from cancerous cells [4], and to resequence targeted genomic regions, such as resequencing protein coding regions to discover somatic mutations [5]. Alternatively, using RNA as an input, the technology has been used to profile RNA expression levels, where the number of sequence reads "tagging" an RNA transcript is a measure of its expression [6].Combining these ideas and building on previous methods [7-10], this report descr
Commissioning of the CMS High Level Trigger
Lorenzo Agostino,Gerry Bauer,Barbara Beccati,Ulf Behrens,Jeffrey Berryhil,Kurt Biery,Tulika Bose,Angela Brett,James Branson,Eric Cano,Harry Cheung,Marek Ciganek,Sergio Cittolin,Jose Antonio Coarasa,Bryan Dahmes,Christian Deldicque,Elizabeth Dusinberre,Samim Erhan,Dominique Gigi,Frank Glege,Robert Gomez-Reino,Johannes Gutleber,Derek Hatton,Jean-Francois Laurens,Constantin Loizides,Frank Ma,Frans Meijers,Emilio Meschi,Andreas Meyer,Remigius K. Mommsen,Roland Moser,Vivian O'Dell,Alexander Oh,Luciano Orsini,Vaios Patras,Christoph Paus,Andrea Petrucci,Marco Pieri,Attila Racz,Hannes Sakulin,Matteo Sani,Philipp Schieferdeckerd,Christoph Schwick,Josep Francesc Serrano Margaleff,Dennis Shpakov,Sean Simon,Konstanty Sumorok,Andre Sungho Yoon,Peter Wittich,Marco Zanetti
Physics , 2009, DOI: 10.1088/1748-0221/4/10/P10005
Abstract: The CMS experiment will collect data from the proton-proton collisions delivered by the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at a centre-of-mass energy up to 14 TeV. The CMS trigger system is designed to cope with unprecedented luminosities and LHC bunch-crossing rates up to 40 MHz. The unique CMS trigger architecture only employs two trigger levels. The Level-1 trigger is implemented using custom electronics, while the High Level Trigger (HLT) is based on software algorithms running on a large cluster of commercial processors, the Event Filter Farm. We present the major functionalities of the CMS High Level Trigger system as of the starting of LHC beams operations in September 2008. The validation of the HLT system in the online environment with Monte Carlo simulated data and its commissioning during cosmic rays data taking campaigns are discussed in detail. We conclude with the description of the HLT operations with the first circulating LHC beams before the incident occurred the 19th September 2008.
Mutations in Radial Spoke Head Genes and Ultrastructural Cilia Defects in East-European Cohort of Primary Ciliary Dyskinesia Patients
Ewa Zi?tkiewicz, Zuzanna Bukowy-Biery??o, Katarzyna Voelkel, Barbara Klimek, Hanna Dmeńska, Andrzej Pogorzelski, Anna Sulikowska-Rowińska, Ewa Rutkiewicz, Micha? Witt
PLOS ONE , 2012, DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0033667
Abstract: Primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD) is a rare (1/20,000), multisystem disease with a complex phenotype caused by the impaired motility of cilia/flagella, usually related to ultrastructural defects of these organelles. Mutations in genes encoding radial spoke head (RSPH) proteins, elements of the ciliary ultrastructure, have been recently described. However, the relative involvement of RSPH genes in PCD pathogenesis remained unknown, due to a small number of PCD families examined for mutations in these genes. The purpose of this study was to estimate the involvement of RSPH4A and RSPH9 in PCD pathogenesis among East Europeans (West Slavs), and to shed more light on ultrastructural ciliary defects caused by mutations in these genes. The coding sequences of RSPH4A and RSPH9 were screened in PCD patients from 184 families, using single strand conformational polymorphism analysis and sequencing. Two previously described (Q109X; R490X) and two new RSPH4A mutations (W356X; IVS3_2–5del), in/around exons 1 and 3, were identified; no mutations were found in RSPH9. We estimate that mutations in RSPH4A, but not in RSPH9, are responsible for 2–3% of cases in the East European PCD population (4% in PCD families without situs inversus; 11% in families preselected for microtubular defects). Analysis of the SNP-haplotype background provided insight into the ancestry of repetitively found mutations (Q109X; R490X; IVS3_2–5del), but further studies involving other PCD cohorts are required to elucidate whether these mutations are specific for Slavic people or spread among other European populations. Ultrastructural defects associated with the mutations were analyzed in the transmission electron microscope images; almost half of the ciliary cross-sections examined in patients with RSPH4A mutations had the microtubule transposition phenotype (9+0 and 8+1 pattern). While microtubule transposition was a prevalent ultrastructural defect in cilia from patients with RSPH4A mutations, similar defects were also observed in PCD patients with mutations in other genes.
The veto system of the DarkSide-50 experiment
The DarkSide Collaboration,P. Agnes,L. Agostino,I. F. M. Albuquerque,T. Alexander,A. K. Alton,K. Arisaka,H. O. Back,B. Baldin,K. Biery,G. Bonfini,M. Bossa,B. Bottino,A. Brigatti,J. Brodsky,F. Budano,S. Bussino,M. Cadeddu,L. Cadonati,M. Cadoni,F. Calaprice,N. Canci,A. Candela,H. Cao,M. Cariello,M. Carlini,S. Catalanotti,P. Cavalcante,A. Chepurnov,A. G. Cocco,G. Covone,L. Crippa,D. D'Angelo,M. D'Incecco,S. Davini,S. De Cecco,M. De Deo,M. De Vincenzi,A. Derbin,A. Devoto,F. Di Eusanio,G. Di Pietro,E. Edkins,A. Empl,A. Fan,G. Fiorillo,K. Fomenko,G. Foster,D. Franco,F. Gabriele,C. Galbiati,C. Giganti,A. M. Goretti,F. Granato,L. Grandi,M. Gromov,M. Guan,Y. Guardincerri,B. R. Hackett,K. R. Herner,E. V. Hungerford,Aldo Ianni,Andrea Ianni,I. James,T. Johnson,C. Jollet,K. Keeter,C. L. Kendziora,V. Kobychev,G. Koh,D. Korablev,G. Korga,A. Kubankin,X. Li,M. Lissia,P. Lombardi,S. Luitz,Y. Ma,I. N. Machulin,A. Mandarano,S. M. Mari,J. Maricic,L. Marini,C. J. Martoff,A. Meregaglia,P. D. Meyers,T. Miletic,R. Milincic,D. Montanari,A. Monte,M. Montuschi,M. E. Monzani,P. Mosteiro,B. J. Mount,V. N. Muratova,P. Musico,J. Napolitano,A. Nelson,S. Odrowski,M. Orsini,F. Ortica,L. Pagani,M. Pallavicini,E. Pantic,S. Parmeggiano,K. Pelczar,N. Pelliccia,S. Perasso,A. Pocar,S. Pordes,D. A. Pugachev,H. Qian,K. Randle,G. Ranucci,A. Razeto,B. Reinhold,A. L. Renshaw,A. Romani,B. Rossi,N. Rossi,S. D. Rountree,D. Sablone,P. Saggese,R. Saldanha,W. Sands,S. Sangiorgio,C. Savarese,E. Segreto,D. A. Semenov,E. Shields
Physics , 2015,
Abstract: Nuclear recoil events produced by neutron scatters form one of the most important classes of background in WIMP direct detection experiments, as they may produce nuclear recoils that look exactly like WIMP interactions. In DarkSide-50, we both actively suppress and measure the rate of neutron-induced background events using our neutron veto, composed of a boron-loaded liquid scintillator detector within a water Cherenkov detector. This paper is devoted to the description of the neutron veto system of DarkSide-50, including the detector structure, the fundamentals of event reconstruction and data analysis, and basic performance parameters.
Mu2e Conceptual Design Report
The Mu2e Project,Collaboration,:,R. J. Abrams,D. Alezander,G. Ambrosio,N. Andreev,C. M. Ankenbrandt,D. M. Asner,D. Arnold,A. Artikov,E. Barnes,L. Bartoszek,R. H. Bernstein,K. Biery,V. Biliyar,R. Bonicalzi,R. Bossert,M. Bowden,J. Brandt,D. N. Brown,J. Budagov,M. Buehler,A. Burov,R. Carcagno,R. M. Carey,R. Carosi,M. Cascella,D. Cauz,F. Cervelli,A. Chandra,J. K. Chang,C. Cheng,P. Ciambrone,R. N. Coleman,M. Cooper,M. C. Corcoran,M. Cordelli,Y. Davydov,A. L. de Gouvea,L. De Lorenzis,P. T. Debevec,F. DeJongh,C. Densham,G. Deuerling,J. Dey,S. Di Falco,S. Dixon,R. Djilkibaev,B. Drendel,E. C. Dukes,A. Dychkant,B. Echenard,R. Ehrlich,N. Evans,D. Evbota,I. Fang,J. E. Fast,S. Feher,M. Fischler,M. Frank,E. Frlez,S. S. Fung,G. Gallo,G. Galucci,A. Gaponenko,K. Genser,S. Giovannella,V. Glagolev,D. Glenzinski,D. Gnani,S. Goadhouse,G. D. Gollin,C. Grace,F. Grancagnolo,C. Group,J. Hanson,S. Hanson,F. Happacher,E. Heckmaier,D. Hedin,D. W. Hertzog,R. Hirosky,D. G. Hitlin,E. Ho,X. Huang,E. Huedem,P. Q. Hung,E. V. Hungerford,T. Ito,W. Jaskierny,R. Jedziniak,R. P. Johnson,C. Johnstone,J. A. Johnstone,S. A. Kahn,P. Kammel,T. I. Kang,V. S. Kashikhin,V. V. Kashikhin,P. Kasper,D. M. Kawall,V. Khalatian,M. Kim,A. Klebaner,D. Kocen,Y. Kolomensky,I. Kourbanis,J. Kowalkowski,J. Kozminski,K. Krempetz,K. S. Kumar,R. K. Kutschke,R. Kwarciany,T. Lackowski,M. Lamm,M. Larwill,K. Lau,M. J. Lee,A. L'Erario,T. Leveling,G. Lim,C. Lindenmeyer,V. Logashenko,T. Lontadze,M. Lopes,A. Luca,K. R. Lynch,T. Ma,A. Maffezzoli
Physics , 2012,
Abstract: Mu2e at Fermilab will search for charged lepton flavor violation via the coherent conversion process mu- N --> e- N with a sensitivity approximately four orders of magnitude better than the current world's best limits for this process. The experiment's sensitivity offers discovery potential over a wide array of new physics models and probes mass scales well beyond the reach of the LHC. We describe herein the conceptual design of the proposed Mu2e experiment. This document was created in partial fulfillment of the requirements necessary to obtain DOE CD-1 approval, which was granted July 11, 2012.
Low radioactivity argon dark matter search results from the DarkSide-50 experiment
The DarkSide Collaboration,P. Agnes,L. Agostino,I. F. M. Albuquerque,T. Alexander,A. K. Alton,K. Arisaka,H. O. Back,B. Baldin,K. Biery,G. Bonfini,M. Bossa,B. Bottino,A. Brigatti,J. Brodsky,F. Budano,S. Bussino,M. Cadeddu,L. Cadonati,M. Cadoni,F. Calaprice,N. Canci,A. Candela,H. Cao,M. Cariello,M. Carlini,S. Catalanotti,P. Cavalcante,A. Chepurnov,A. G. Cocco,G. Covone,L. Crippa,D. D'Angelo,M. D'Incecco,S. Davini,S. De Cecco,M. De Deo,M. De Vincenzi,A. Derbin,A. Devoto,F. Di Eusanio,G. Di Pietro,E. Edkins,A. Empl,A. Fan,G. Fiorillo,K. Fomenko,G. Forster,D. Franco,F. Gabriele,C. Galbiati,C. Giganti,A. M. Goretti,F. Granato,L. Grandi,M. Gromov,M. Guan,Y. Guardincerri,B. R. Hackett,K. Herner,E. V. Hungerford,Al. Ianni,An. Ianni,I. James,C. Jollet,K. Keeter,C. L. Kendziora,V. Kobychev,G. Koh,D. Korablev,G. Korga,A. Kubankin,X. Li,M. Lissia,P. Lombardi,S. Luitz,Y. Ma,I. N. Machulin,A. Mandarano,S. M. Mari,J. Maricic,L. Marini,C. J. Martoff,A. Meregaglia,P. D. Meyers,T. Miletic,R. Milincic,D. Montanari,A. Monte,M. Montuschi,M. Monzani,P. Mosteiro,B. J. Mount,V. N. Muratova,P. Musico,J. Napolitano,A. Nelson,S. Odrowski,M. Orsini,F. Ortica,L. Pagani,M. Pallavicini,E. Pantic,S. Parmeggiano,K. Pelczar,N. Pelliccia,S. Perasso,A. Pocar,S. Pordes,D. A. Pugachev,H. Qian,K. Randle,G. Ranucci,A. Razeto,B. Reinhold,A. L. Renshaw,A. Romani,B. Rossi,N. Rossi,D. Rountree,D. Sablone,P. Saggese,R. Saldanha,W. Sands,S. Sangiorgio,C. Savarese,E. Segreto,D. A. Semenov,E. Shields,P. N. Singh
Physics , 2015,
Abstract: The DarkSide-50 dark matter search reports the first results obtained using a target of low-radioactivity argon extracted from underground sources. The experiment is located at the Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso and uses a two-phase time projection chamber as a detector. A total of 155 kg of low radioactivity argon has been obtained, and we have determined that underground argon is depleted in Ar-39 by a factor (1.4 +- 0.2) x 10^3 relative to atmospheric argon. The underground argon is also found to contain (2.05 +- 0.13) mBq/kg of Kr-85. We find no evidence for dark matter in the form of WIMPs in 70.9 live-days of data with a fiducial mass of (36.9 +- 0.6) kg. When combined with our preceding search with an atmospheric argon target, we set a 90 % C.L. upper limit on the WIMP-nucleon spin-independent cross section of 2.0 x 10^-44 cm^2 (8.6 x 10^-44 cm^2, 8.0 x 10^-43 cm^2) for a WIMP mass of 100 GeV/c^2 (1 TeV/c^2 , 10 TeV/c^2).
First Results from the DarkSide-50 Dark Matter Experiment at Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso
P. Agnes,T. Alexander,A. Alton,K. Arisaka,H. O. Back,B. Baldin,K. Biery,G. Bonfini,M. Bossa,A. Brigatti,J. Brodsky,F. Budano,L. Cadonati,F. Calaprice,N. Canci,A. Candela,H. Cao,M. Cariello,P. Cavalcante,A. Chavarria,A. Chepurnov,A. G. Cocco,L. Crippa,D. D'Angelo,M. D'Incecco,S. Davini,M. De Deo,A. Derbin,A. Devoto,F. Di Eusanio,G. Di Pietro,E. Edkins,A. Empl,A. Fan,G. Fiorillo,K. Fomenko,G. Forster,D. Franco,F. Gabriele,C. Galbiati,A. Goretti,L. Grandi,M. Gromov,M. Y. Guan,Y. Guardincerri,B. Hackett,K. Herner,E. V. Hungerford,Al. Ianni,An. Ianni,C. Jollet,K. Keeter,C. Kendziora,S. Kidner,V. Kobychev,G. Koh,D. Korablev,G. Korga,A. Kurlej,P. X. Li,B. Loer,P. Lombardi,C. Love,L. Ludhova,S. Luitz,Y. Q. Ma,I. Machulin,A. Mandarano,S. Mari,J. Maricic,L. Marini,C. J. Martoff,A. Meregaglia,E. Meroni,P. D. Meyers,R. Milincic,D. Montanari,A. Monte,M. Montuschi,M. E. Monzani,P. Mosteiro,B. Mount,V. Muratova,P. Musico,A. Nelson,S. Odrowski,M. Okounkova,M. Orsini,F. Ortica,L. Pagani,M. Pallavicini,E. Pantic,L. Papp,S. Parmeggiano,R. Parsells,K. Pelczar,N. Pelliccia,S. Perasso,A. Pocar,S. Pordes,D. Pugachev,H. Qian,K. Randle,G. Ranucci,A. Razeto,B. Reinhold,A. Renshaw,A. Romani,B. Rossi,N. Rossi,S. D. Rountree,D. Sablone,P. Saggese,R. Saldanha,W. Sands,S. Sangiorgio,E. Segreto,D. Semenov,E. Shields,M. Skorokhvatov,O. Smirnov,A. Sotnikov,C. Stanford,Y. Suvorov,R. Tartaglia,J. Tatarowicz,G. Testera,A. Tonazzo,E. Unzhakov,R. B. Vogelaar,M. Wada,S. Walker,H. Wang,Y. Wang,A. Watson
Physics , 2014, DOI: 10.1016/j.physletb.2015.03.012
Abstract: We report the first results of DarkSide-50, a direct search for dark matter operating in the underground Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso (LNGS) and searching for the rare nuclear recoils possibly induced by weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs). The dark matter detector is a Liquid Argon Time Projection Chamber with a (46.4+-0.7) kg active mass, operated inside a 30 t organic liquid scintillator neutron veto, which is in turn installed at the center of a 1 kt water Cherenkov veto for the residual flux of cosmic rays. We report here the null results of a dark matter search for a (1422+-67) kg d exposure with an atmospheric argon fill. This is the most sensitive dark matter search performed with an argon target, corresponding to a 90% CL upper limit on the WIMP-nucleon spin-independent cross section of 6.1x10^-44 cm^2 for a WIMP mass of 100 GeV/c^2.
The Electronics and Data Acquisition System of the DarkSide Dark Matter Search
The DarkSide Collaboration,P. Agnes,T. Alexander,A. Alton,K. Arisaka,H. O. Back,B. Baldin,K. Biery,G. Bonfini,M. Bossa,A. Brigatti,J. Brodsky,F. Budano,L. Cadonati,F. Calaprice,N. Canci,A. Candela,H. Cao,M. Cariello,P. Cavalcante,A. Chavarria,A. Chepurnov,A. G. Cocco,L. Crippa,D. D'Angelo,M. D'Incecco,S. Davini,M. De Deo,A. Derbin,A. Devoto,F. Di Eusanio,G. Di Pieto,E. Edkins,A. Empl,A. Fan,G. Fiorillo,K. Fomenko,G. Forster,D. Franco,F. Gabriele,C. Galbiati,A. Goretti,L. Grandi,M. Gromov,M. Y. Guan,Y. Guardincerri,B. Hackett,K. Herner,E. Hungerford,Al. Ianni,An. Ianni,C. Jollet,K. Keeter,C. Kendziora,S. Kidner,V. Kobychev,G. Koh,D. Korablev,G. Korga,A. Kurlej,P. X. Li,B. Loer,P. Lombardi,C. Love,L. Ludhova,S. Luitz,Y. Q. Ma,I. Machulin,A. Mandarano,S. M. Mari,J. Maricic,L. Marini,J. Martoff,A. Meregaglia,E. Meroni,P. D. Meyers,R. Milincic,D. Montanari,M. Montuschi,M. E. Monzani,P. Mosteiro,B. Mount,V. Muratova,P. Musico,A. Nelson,S. Odrowski,M. Okounkoa,M. Orsini,F. Ortica,L. Pagani,M. Pallavicini,E. Pantic,L. Papp,S. Parmeggiano,Bob Parsells,K. Pelczar,N. Pelliccia,S. Perasso,A. Pocar,S. Pordes,D. Pugachev,H. Qian,K. Randle,G. Ranucci,A. Razeto,B. Reinhold,A. Renshaw,A. Romani,B. Rossi,N. Rossi,S. D. Rountree,D. Sablone,P. Saggese,R. Saldanha,W. Sands,S. Sangiorgio,E. Segreto,D. Semenov,E. Shields,M. Skorokhvatov,O. Smirnov,A. Sotnikov,C. Stanford,Suvorov,R. Tartaglia,J. Tatarowicz,G. Testera,A. Tonazzo,E. Unzhakov,R. B. Vogelaar,M. Wada,S. E. Walker,H. Wang,Y. Wang
Physics , 2014,
Abstract: It is generally inferred from astronomical measurements that Dark Matter (DM) comprises approximately 27\% of the energy-density of the universe. If DM is a subatomic particle, a possible candidate is a Weakly Interacting Massive Particle (WIMP), and the DarkSide-50 (DS) experiment is a direct search for evidence of WIMP-nuclear collisions. DS is located underground at the Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso (LNGS) in Italy, and consists of three active, embedded components; an outer water veto (CTF), a liquid scintillator veto (LSV), and a liquid argon (LAr) time projection chamber (TPC). This paper describes the data acquisition and electronic systems of the DS detectors, designed to detect the residual ionization from such collisions.
Mu2e Technical Design Report
L. Bartoszek,E. Barnes,J. P. Miller,J. Mott,A. Palladino,J. Quirk,B. L. Roberts,J. Crnkovic,V. Polychronakos,V. Tishchenko,P. Yamin,C. -h. Cheng,B. Echenard,K. Flood,D. G. Hitlin,J. H. Kim,T. S. Miyashita,F. C. Porter,M. R?hrken,J. Trevor,R. -Y. Zhu,E. Heckmaier,T. I. Kang,G. Lim,W. Molzon,Z. You,A. M. Artikov,J. A. Budagov,Yu. I. Davydov,V. V. Glagolev,A. V. Simonenko,Z. U. Usubov,S. H. Oh,C. Wang,G. Ambrosio,N. Andreev,D. Arnold,M. Ball,R. H. Bernstein,A. Bianchi,K. Biery,R. Bossert,M. Bowden,J. Brandt,G. Brown,H. Brown,M. Buehler,M. Campbell,S. Cheban,M. Chen,J. Coghill,R. Coleman,C. Crowley,A. Deshpande,G. Deuerling,J. Dey,N. Dhanaraj,M. Dinnon,S. Dixon,B. Drendel,N. Eddy,R. Evans,D. Evbota,J. Fagan,S. Feher,B. Fellenz,H. Friedsam,G. Gallo,A. Gaponenko,M. Gardner,S. Gaugel,K. Genser,G. Ginther,H. Glass,D. Glenzinski,D. Hahn,S. Hansen,B. Hartsell,S. Hays,J. A. Hocker,E. Huedem,D. Huffman,A. Ibrahim,C. Johnstone,V. Kashikhin,V. V. Kashikhin,P. Kasper,T. Kiper,D. Knapp,K. Knoepfel,L. Kokoska,M. Kozlovsky,G. Krafczyk,M. Kramp,S. Krave,K. Krempetz,R. K. Kutschke,R. Kwarciany,T. Lackowski,M. J. Lamm,M. Larwill,F. Leavell,D. Leeb,A. Leveling,D. Lincoln,V. Logashenko,V. Lombardo,M. L. Lopes,A. Makulski,A. Martinez,D. McArthur,F. McConologue,L. Michelotti,N. Mokhov,J. Morgan,A. Mukherjee,P. Murat,V. Nagaslaev,D. V. Neuffer,T. Nicol,J. Niehoff,J. Nogiec,M. Olson,D. Orris,R. Ostojic,T. Page,C. Park,T. Peterson,R. Pilipenko,A. Pla-Dalmau,V. Poloubotko,M. Popovic,E. Prebys,P. Prieto
Physics , 2015,
Abstract: The Mu2e experiment at Fermilab will search for charged lepton flavor violation via the coherent conversion process mu- N --> e- N with a sensitivity approximately four orders of magnitude better than the current world's best limits for this process. The experiment's sensitivity offers discovery potential over a wide array of new physics models and probes mass scales well beyond the reach of the LHC. We describe herein the preliminary design of the proposed Mu2e experiment. This document was created in partial fulfillment of the requirements necessary to obtain DOE CD-2 approval.
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