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Search Results: 1 - 10 of 464407 matches for " Justin A. Bishop "
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A Large Nonmetastatic Anaplastic Thyroid Cancer with Complete Thyroidal Confinement
Jeffrey C. Xing,Justin A. Bishop,Nestoras Mathioudakis,Nishant Agrawal,Ralph P. Tufano
Case Reports in Medicine , 2011, DOI: 10.1155/2011/583978
Abstract: Anaplastic thyroid cancer (ATC) is rare but extremely aggressive, which accounts for about 2% of all thyroid cancers yet nearly 50% of thyroid-cancer-associated deaths in the United States. The median survival time from diagnosis is 5 months, with a 1-year survival rate of only 20%. We report here a case of ATC in a 56-year-old man who survived a large ATC. Preoperative fine-needle aspiration biopsy study to a large right thyroid mass suggested ATC. Total thyroidectomy with radical lateral neck and central neck dissection removed a well-circumscribed 9.5 cm tumor without extrathyroidal extension or lymphovascular invasion. All 73 lymph nodes removed were negative for metastasis. The tumor consisted of highly pleomorphic, undifferentiated cells with large zones of necrosis and loss of thyroid transcription factor-1 and thyroglobulin expression. A focal well-differentiated component and PAX8 expression confirmed its thyroid follicular cell origin. Nine months after postsurgical adjuvant concurrent radiation therapy and chemotherapy, the patient remained well without clinical, biochemical, and radiographical evidence for cancer recurrence. This is an unusual case of ATC in that it is one of the largest ATC tumors reported to display mild pathologic behavior and relatively long-term patient survival.
The Effect of Amifostine on Submandibular Gland Histology after Radiation
Jacqueline C. Junn,James J. Sciubba,Justin A. Bishop,Eva Zinreich,Mei Tang,Marshall A. Levine,Robert A. Palermo,Carole Fakhry,Ray G. Blanco,John R. Saunders,Joseph A. Califano,Patrick K. Ha
International Journal of Otolaryngology , 2012, DOI: 10.1155/2012/508279
Abstract: Background. The purpose of this study was to assess the effects of amifostine on submandibular gland histology in patients receiving chemoradiation therapy. Methods. We conducted a retrospective submandibular gland histologic slide review of HNSCC patients receiving chemoradiation for head and neck squamous cell carcinoma with three different levels of amifostine exposure. We used six scoring parameters: fatty replacement, lobular architecture degeneration, interstitial fibrosis, ductal degeneration, acinar degeneration, and inflammatory component presence. Results. Differences in gender, tumor stage, amifostine dose, age, number of days after neck dissection, and smoking history (pack years) exposure were not significant between the three groups, although there was a difference between groups in the primary subsite (=0.006). The nonparametric Cuzick's test for histologic parameters with varied amifostine treatment showed no significance among the three groups. Conclusions. Although patients did not receive a full dose of amifostine due to side effects, varying doses of amifostine had no apparent evident cytoprotective effects in three groups of cancer patients treated with primary chemoradiation.
The Effect of Amifostine on Submandibular Gland Histology after Radiation
Jacqueline C. Junn,James J. Sciubba,Justin A. Bishop,Eva Zinreich,Mei Tang,Marshall A. Levine,Robert A. Palermo,Carole Fakhry,Ray G. Blanco,John R. Saunders,Joseph A. Califano,Patrick K. Ha
International Journal of Otolaryngology , 2012, DOI: 10.1155/2012/508279
Abstract: Background. The purpose of this study was to assess the effects of amifostine on submandibular gland histology in patients receiving chemoradiation therapy. Methods. We conducted a retrospective submandibular gland histologic slide review of HNSCC patients receiving chemoradiation for head and neck squamous cell carcinoma with three different levels of amifostine exposure. We used six scoring parameters: fatty replacement, lobular architecture degeneration, interstitial fibrosis, ductal degeneration, acinar degeneration, and inflammatory component presence. Results. Differences in gender, tumor stage, amifostine dose, age, number of days after neck dissection, and smoking history (pack years) exposure were not significant between the three groups, although there was a difference between groups in the primary subsite ( ). The nonparametric Cuzick's test for histologic parameters with varied amifostine treatment showed no significance among the three groups. Conclusions. Although patients did not receive a full dose of amifostine due to side effects, varying doses of amifostine had no apparent evident cytoprotective effects in three groups of cancer patients treated with primary chemoradiation. 1. Introduction Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) is the sixth most common cancer in the United States [1] and includes cancers of the paranasal sinuses, oral cavity, nasopharynx, oropharynx, hypopharynx, and larynx. Combined chemoradiation therapy is one commonly employed treatment option for head and neck cancer patients with advanced stage disease. Salivary glands often lie within the radiation field with resultant radiation damage leading to undesirable functional sequelae, such as xerostomia [2]. Because xerostomia has distressing consequences on patients’ lives [3, 4], developing protective mechanisms for the salivary glands is an important avenue of investigation. Amifostine is one such radioprotective drug currently approved for use to reduce the occurrence of xerostomia in head and neck cancer patients by way of providing a reduction of radiation-related damage to salivary gland parenchyma. Amifostine is administered intravenously or subcutaneously as an inactive prodrug. Alkaline phosphatase converts amifostine into an active thiol by dephosphorylation [5]. The cytoprotective selectivity of amifostine is based on the differences between the physiological environment of normal and tumor cells; tumor cells are hypovascular, have low interstitial pH, and lower expression of alkaline phosphatase than normal cells [6]. Hence, amifostine acts
Suprabasin Is Hypomethylated and Associated with Metastasis in Salivary Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma
Chunbo Shao,Marietta Tan,Justin A. Bishop,Jia Liu,Weiliang Bai,Daria A. Gaykalova,Takenori Ogawa,Ami R. Vikani,Yuri Agrawal,Ryan J. Li,Myoung Sook Kim,William H. Westra,David Sidransky,Joseph A. Califano,Patrick K. Ha
PLOS ONE , 2012, DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0048582
Abstract: Salivary gland adenoid cystic carcinoma (ACC) is a rare cancer, accounting for only 1% of all head and neck malignancies. ACC is well known for perineural invasion and distant metastasis, but its underlying molecular mechanisms of carcinogenesis are still unclear.
Expression Microarray Analysis Reveals Alternative Splicing of LAMA3 and DST Genes in Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma
Ryan Li, Michael F. Ochs, Sun Mi Ahn, Patrick Hennessey, Marietta Tan, Ethan Soudry, Daria A. Gaykalova, Mamoru Uemura, Mariana Brait, Chunbo Shao, William Westra, Justin Bishop, Elana J. Fertig, Joseph A. Califano
PLOS ONE , 2014, DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0091263
Abstract: Purpose Prior studies have demonstrated tumor-specific alternative splicing events in various solid tumor types. The role of alternative splicing in the development and progression of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) is unclear. Our study queried exon-level expression to implicate splice variants in HNSCC tumors. Experimental Design We performed a comparative genome-wide analysis of 44 HNSCC tumors and 25 uvulopalatopharyngoplasty (UPPP) tissue samples at an exon expression level. In our comparison we ranked genes based upon a novel score—the Maximum-Minimum Exon Score (MMES) – designed to predict the likelihood of an alternative splicing event occurring. We validated predicted alternative splicing events using quantitative RT-PCR on an independent cohort. Results After MMES scoring of 17,422 genes, the top 900 genes with the highest scores underwent additional manual inspection of expression patterns in a graphical analysis. The genes LAMA3, DST, VEGFC, SDHA, RASIP1, and TP63 were selected for further validation studies because of a high frequency of alternative splicing suggested in our graphical analysis, and literature review showing their biological relevance and known splicing patterns. We confirmed TP63 as having dominant expression of the short DeltaNp63 isoform in HNSCC tumor samples, consistent with prior reports. Two of the six genes (LAMA3 and DST) validated by quantitative RT-PCR for tumor-specific alternative splicing events (Student's t test, P<0.001). Conclusion Alternative splicing events of oncologically relevant proteins occur in HNSCC. The number of genes expressing tumor-specific splice variants needs further elucidation, as does the functional significance of selective isoform expression.
Aging with an adult-onset physical disability: A scoping review
Kristen A. Bishop,Sandra Hobson
International Journal of Integrated Care , 2012,
Abstract:
Pressure-induced phase transition to a novel spin state in striped nickelates
E. Kaneshita,A. R. Bishop
Physics , 2008, DOI: 10.1143/JPSJ.77.123709
Abstract: We analyze pressure effects on stripe states within a selfconsistent Hartree-Fock calculation for a model of a striped nickelates. The results show a transition induced by high pressure and predict possible new spin states. We describe characteristics in the phonon excitations at the predicted transition, based on a real-space random phase approximation.
Z_2 Gauge Theory of Electron Fractionalization in the t,t'-J Model
D. Schmeltzer,A. R. Bishop
Physics , 2004,
Abstract: We consider a strongly correlated "t,t'-J" spin model with a positive uniaxial anisotropy. We show that in 2+1 dimensions, this model is equivalent to spin-charge excitations coupled to Z_2 Ising gauge fields and not to a U(1) gauge fields (as in the "t-J" model). As a result a phase of frozen Z_2 gauge fluctuations is possible, giving rise to a spin-charge-separated liquid.
Thermomechanical Stability and Mechanochemical Response of DNA: a Minimal Mesoscale Model
Cristiano Nisoli,A. R. Bishop
Quantitative Biology , 2014, DOI: 10.1063/1.4895724
Abstract: We show that a mesoscale model, with a minimal number of parameters, can well describe the thermomechanical and mechanochemical behavior of homogeneous DNA at thermal equilibrium under tension and torque. We predict critical temperatures for denaturation under torque and stretch, phase diagrams for stable DNA, probe/response profiles under mechanical loads, and the density of dsDNA as a function of stretch and twist. We compare our predictions with available single molecule manipulation experiments and find strong agreement. In particular we elucidate the difference between angularly constrained and unconstrained overstretching. We propose that the smoothness of the angularly constrained overstreching transition is a consequence of the molecule being in the vicinity of criticality for a broad range of values of applied tension.
Thermomechanics of DNA
Cristiano Nisoli,A. R. Bishop
Quantitative Biology , 2011, DOI: 10.1103/PhysRevLett.107.068102
Abstract: A theory for thermomechanical behavior of homogeneous DNA at thermal equilibrium predicts critical temperatures for denaturation under torque and stretch, phase diagrams for stable B--DNA, supercoiling, optimally stable torque, and the overstretching transition as force-induced DNA melting. Agreement with available single molecule manipulation experiments is excellent.
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