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Search Results: 1 - 10 of 3049 matches for " Julie Champagne "
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Emotion Processing in Women with Schizophrenia Is Menstrual Cycle Phase and Affective Valence Dependent: An fMRI Study
Adrianna Mendrek,Josiane Bourque,Annie Dubé,Nadia Lakis,Julie Champagne
ISRN Psychiatry , 2012, DOI: 10.5402/2012/656274
Abstract: Despite a large number of functional neuroimaging investigations of emotion processing in schizophrenia, very few have included women. In the present study 21 schizophrenia and 23 healthy women underwent functional MRI (3T) on two occasions (during the follicular and luteal phase of their menstrual cycle) while viewing blocks of emotionally negative, positive and neutral images. During exposure to negatively charged images patients showed relatively less activations than controls during the luteal phase, but no between-group differences were observed during the follicular phase. In contrast, the exposure to positively valenced material produced no significant interaction, but the main effect of group; schizophrenia patients exhibited less activation than healthy controls during both phases of the menstrual cycle. This is the first study demonstrating that atypical neural activations associated with emotion processing in women diagnosed with schizophrenia depend on the menstrual cycle phase and on the affective valence of presented stimuli. 1. Introduction Schizophrenia is a complex and clinically heterogeneous psychiatric disorder with unknown etiology, age at onset in late adolescence/early adulthood, and a lifetime prevalence of approximately 1% [1, 2]. One of the hallmark characteristics of this devastating disorder is a disturbance in emotion processing, which has been demonstrated in numerous behavioral, physiological, and functional neuroimaging investigations that employed tasks ranging from passive viewing of emotional material, through to facial emotion identification and emotional memory [3–8]. Although widely investigated, the neural correlates of atypical emotion processing in schizophrenia patients are still not well understood. For instance, while the majority of studies report diminished activations in patients relative to healthy subjects in several regions implicated in affect (e.g., hippocampus, amygdala, medial prefrontal, orbitofrontal cortex, and cingulate cortices) (e.g., [9–12]), others have found no effect or increased neural reactivity to emotionally charged material (e.g., [13–15]). In our recent study we have observed diminished activations during retrieval of negatively valenced emotional material but enhanced activations during positively valenced condition in clinically stable schizophrenia patients relative to controls [8]. Thus, one important factor to consider is affective valence of presented stimuli. Another important variable is gender of tested individuals, as numerous studies in the general population have
Progesterone and Cerebral Function during Emotion Processing in Men and Women with Schizophrenia
Julie Champagne,Nadia Lakis,Josiane Bourque,Emmanuel Stip,Olivier Lipp,Adrianna Mendrek
Schizophrenia Research and Treatment , 2012, DOI: 10.1155/2012/917901
Abstract: Schizophrenia has been associated with disturbed levels of sex-steroid hormones, including estrogen and testosterone. In the present study we have examined the implication of a less studied hormone progesterone. Forty-three patients with schizophrenia (21 women) and 43 control participants (21 women) underwent functional MRI while viewing emotionally positive, negative, and neutral images. Blood samples were taken prior to the scanning session to evaluate progesterone levels. Simple regression analyses between levels of progesterone and brain activations associated with emotion processing were performed using SPM5. A positive correlation was found between progesterone levels and brain activations during processing of emotionally charged images in both healthy and schizophrenia men, but no significant relationship was revealed in women. These preliminary results indicate that progesterone is significantly associated with brain activations during processing of positive and negative affect in healthy and schizophrenia men, but not in women. Further investigation is warranted.
Progesterone and Cerebral Function during Emotion Processing in Men and Women with Schizophrenia
Julie Champagne,Nadia Lakis,Josiane Bourque,Emmanuel Stip,Olivier Lipp,Adrianna Mendrek
Schizophrenia Research and Treatment , 2012, DOI: 10.1155/2012/917901
Abstract: Schizophrenia has been associated with disturbed levels of sex-steroid hormones, including estrogen and testosterone. In the present study we have examined the implication of a less studied hormone progesterone. Forty-three patients with schizophrenia (21 women) and 43 control participants (21 women) underwent functional MRI while viewing emotionally positive, negative, and neutral images. Blood samples were taken prior to the scanning session to evaluate progesterone levels. Simple regression analyses between levels of progesterone and brain activations associated with emotion processing were performed using SPM5. A positive correlation was found between progesterone levels and brain activations during processing of emotionally charged images in both healthy and schizophrenia men, but no significant relationship was revealed in women. These preliminary results indicate that progesterone is significantly associated with brain activations during processing of positive and negative affect in healthy and schizophrenia men, but not in women. Further investigation is warranted. 1. Introduction There is some evidence of a relationship between sex-steroid hormones (i.e., estrogen, testosterone, and less commonly progesterone) and emotion processing in the general population [1–3]. Fluctuations in estrogen and progesterone have been linked with increased vulnerability to mood disorders in women, while elevated levels of testosterone have been primarily associated with antisocial behaviours, behaviours of dominance, and aggressiveness in both men and women [4]. In schizophrenia, some studies have found abnormal levels of estrogens and testosterone in patients, but the results have been equivocal and sometimes attributed to the antipsychotic-induced hyperprolactinemia, which may alter levels of gonadal hormones [5]. Despite numerous studies and clinical observations of lower relapse of clinical symptoms during pregnancy, high relapse postpartum, and the fluctuation of symptoms across the menstrual cycle (attributed typically to the changing levels of estrogens), a link between progesterone and affect in schizophrenia has yet to be examined [6]. The little emphasis that has been placed on the relationship between progesterone and emotional functioning has been explored primarily in healthy women because this hormone is a female reproductive hormone. Nonetheless, it is produced in both men and women, and recent evidence suggests that it is implicated in brain function of both sexes. Thus, progesterone has been shown to play an important role in mood regulation [7],
Promoting School Based Cohorts in Distance/Online Learning  [PDF]
Janis McKinley, D. J. Champagne
Creative Education (CE) , 2013, DOI: 10.4236/ce.2013.48A003
Abstract: Successful cohort online learning requires three important components: Community, Collaboration, and Content. Looking at how to develop these components is discussed as a result of what is known by the authors’ active engaging in the cohort online learning model.
Compreens?o de Discurso N?o Literal: O Caso de Viola??es das Máximas de Quantidade e de Solicita??es Indiretas
Champagne, Maud;
Psicologia: Reflex?o e Crítica , 2001, DOI: 10.1590/S0102-79722001000200012
Abstract: to understand a nonliteral speech act, we must be able to differentiate what the speaker says from what he wants to say using the contextually relevant information. the aim of this study is to determine whether there exists a hierarchy of complexity across various nonliteral speech acts such as: violations of the maxim of relation, violations of the maxim of quantity, indirect requests and ironic statements. the analysis of reading time of the target sentences (56 literal and 56 nonliteral) of the stories indicates some differences in the processing of some nonliteral speech acts for comprehension. more precisely, indirect requests appear to be processed differently from the three other types of speech acts and subjects appear not to perceive violations of the maxims of quantity as nonliteral speech acts.
Compreens o de Discurso N o Literal: O Caso de Viola es das Máximas de Quantidade e de Solicita es Indiretas
Champagne Maud
Psicologia: Reflex?o e Crítica , 2001,
Abstract: Para entendermos um ato de fala n o literal devemos ser capazes de diferenciar entre o que o interlocutor fala do que deseja dizer usando informa es contextualmente relevantes. O objetivo deste estudo é determinar se existe uma hierarquia de complexidade que perpassa os vários atos de falas n o literais, tais como: viola es da máxima de rela o, viola es da máxima de quantidade, solicita es indiretas e afirmativas ir nicas. A análise do tempo de leitura de frases alvo (56 literais e 56 n o literais) de histórias indica a existência de diferen as no processamento de alguns dos atos de falas n o literais para compreens o. Mais precisamente, solicita es indiretas parecem ser processadas diferentemente nos três outros tipos de atos de discurso e os sujeitos parecem n o perceber viola es das máximas de quantidade como atos de fala n o literais.
Starter Cultures Biotechnology: The Production of Concentrated Lactic Cultures in Alginate Beads and Their Applications in the Nutraceutical and Food Industries (Review paper)
Claude P. Champagne
Chemical Industry and Chemical Engineering Quarterly , 2006,
Abstract: n/a
Centralized Adaptation for Parameter Estimation over Wireless Sensor Networks
Reza Abdolee,Benoit Champagne
Mathematics , 2015,
Abstract: We study the performance of centralized least mean-squares (CLMS) algorithms in wireless sensor networks where nodes transmit their data over fading channels to a central processing unit (e.g., fusion center or cluster head), for parameter estimation. Wireless channel impairments, including fading and path loss, distort the transmitted data, cause link failure and degrade the performance of the adaptive solutions. To address this problem, we propose a novel CLMS algorithm that uses a refined version of the transmitted data and benefits from a link failure alarm strategy to discard severely distorted data. Furthermore, to remove the bias due to communication noise from the estimate, we introduce a bias-elimination scheme that also leads to a lower steady-state mean-square error. Our theoretical findings are supported by numerical simulation results.
Diffusion LMS Strategies in Sensor Networks with Noisy Input Data
Reza Abdolee,Benoit Champagne
Mathematics , 2015,
Abstract: We investigate the performance of distributed least-mean square (LMS) algorithms for parameter estimation over sensor networks where the regression data of each node are corrupted by white measurement noise. Under this condition, we show that the estimates produced by distributed LMS algorithms will be biased if the regression noise is excluded from consideration. We propose a bias-elimination technique and develop a novel class of diffusion LMS algorithms that can mitigate the effect of regression noise and obtain an unbiased estimate of the unknown parameter vector over the network. In our development, we first assume that the variances of the regression noises are known a-priori. Later, we relax this assumption by estimating these variances in real-time. We analyze the stability and convergence of the proposed algorithms and derive closed-form expressions to characterize their mean-square error performance in transient and steady-state regimes. We further provide computer experiment results that illustrate the efficiency of the proposed algorithms and support the analytical findings.
The Efficacy and Safety of a Patent Pending Combination of Ginger and Goldenrod Extracts on the Management of Cold Symptoms: A Randomized, Double-Blind Controlled Trial  [PDF]
Johane Guay, Pierre Champagne, Pascal Guibord, Joerg Gruenwald
Food and Nutrition Sciences (FNS) , 2012, DOI: 10.4236/fns.2012.312216
Abstract: Objective: In a randomized, double-blind, exploratory, active-controlled trial, the efficacy and safety of a patent-pending combination of Ginger and Goldenrod extracts (BDI-630) in alleviating cold symptoms in community-dwelling adults was compared to a combination of standardized amounts of Echinacea (EC) components. Methods: 44 healthy adults, experiencing new onset of cold symptoms were randomly assigned to receive either BDI-630 (900 mg) or EC (500 mg) twice daily for 10 days. The severity of cold symptoms and the quality of life was assessed by self-reporting of subjects using the Wisconsin Upper Respiratory Symptom Survey (WURSS-21? 2004). Results: The intent-to-treat population (ITT) consisted of 44 subjects (n = 22 for BDI-630; n = 22 for EC). The modified ITT (mITT) population consisted of 40 subjects, excluding four subjects with major protocol deviations related to inclusion/exclusion criteria and/or use of prohibited drugs from the efficacy analysis (n = 3 for BDI-630 and n = 1 for EC). Results indicated a sig-nificant difference between the two groups: the superiority of BDI-630 over EC was particularly noticeable between Day 1 and Day 7, as demonstrated by a 14-fold difference of the mean percentage of change of total score from baseline in the mITT population. Adverse events (AEs) following the intake of BDI-630 were mostly limited to mild gastrointestinal intolerance in less than 10% of the subjects. Conclusions: BDI-630 was shown to be more effective than EC in alleviating cold symptoms in the adult population, particularly during the first 7 days of treatment. BDI-630 was very well tolerated by all subjects.
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