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Search Results: 1 - 10 of 5857 matches for " Julia Emerson? "
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Squamous Differentiation and Cytokeratin Expression in an Osteosarcoma: A Case Report and Review of the Literature
Lester J. Layfield, Lyska Emerson, Julia R. Crim and Lor Randall
Clinical Medicine Insights: Pathology , 2012,
Abstract: Cytokeratin expression has been documented in a variety of sarcomas including synovial sarcomas, epithelioid sarcomas, Ewing’s sarcomas and, rarely, osteosarcomas. In osteosarcomas immunohistochemically shown to expression cytokeratins, a component of epithelioid cells is generally present. These epithelioid cytokeratin positive cells raise the possibility of metastatic disease with prognostic and therapeutic implications differing from primary osteosarcoma. The cytokeratin-expressing cells of the cases reported in the literature have not shown definitive squamous differentiation with keratin pearl formation. We report a case of osteosarcoma in which islands of malignant squamous cells were present showing keratin pearl formation and expression of cytokeratins.
Squamous Differentiation and Cytokeratin Expression in an Osteosarcoma: A Case Report and Review of the Literature
Lester J. Layfield,Lyska Emerson,Julia R. Crim,Lor Randall
Clinical Medicine : Pathology , 2008,
Abstract: Cytokeratin expression has been documented in a variety of sarcomas including synovial sarcomas, epithelioid sarcomas, Ewing’s sarcomas and, rarely, osteosarcomas. In osteosarcomas immunohistochemically shown to expression cytokeratins, a component of epithelioid cells is generally present. These epithelioid cytokeratin positive cells raise the possibility of metastatic disease with prognostic and therapeutic implications differing from primary osteosarcoma. The cytokeratin-expressing cells of the cases reported in the literature have not shown definitive squamous differentiation with keratin pearl formation. We report a case of osteosarcoma in which islands of malignant squamous cells were present showing keratin pearl formation and expression of cytokeratins.
Electing an All-Party, Proportional, Power-Sharing Coalition, a Government of National Unity  [PDF]
Peter Emerson
Open Journal of Political Science (OJPS) , 2013, DOI: 10.4236/ojps.2013.32009
Abstract:

There are many instances when a group of people might want to choose a committee, a fixed number of individuals to undertake a particular collective function. At their AGM or annual conference, residents in a community group, shareholders of a limited company, members of a trades union, and those of a political party, may all want to elect an executive: one person to be chair, another secretary, a third treasurer, etc. All these posts require different talents and all the individual office bearers undertake necessary but separate functions for the successful operation of that committee. In like manner, a parliament may choose to elect a government of national unity (GNU). The only voting procedure so far devised by which a given electoratethose concerned at an AGM or members of parliament (MPs)may elect, not only those whom they wish to be in cabinet, but also the ministerial posts in which each of those chosen will then serve, is the matrix vote. This paper describes 1) an experiment held at the Political Studies Association of Ireland (PSAI), undergraduate conference in Dublin on 23rd June 2012 inwhich participants, role playing as members of the Irish parliament, elected a GNU; and 2) the matrix vote methodology, such that others may also employ this voting system. An obvious instance would be for the election of an all-party power-sharing executive in a post-conflict zone.

Democratic Rights: Decision-Making by Law Makers and Law Enforcers  [PDF]
Peter Emerson
Beijing Law Review (BLR) , 2013, DOI: 10.4236/blr.2013.42010
Abstract: The court of law is often adversarial; the more usual question, after all, is binary: guilty or not guilty? The parliament which makes the law, however, need not subject complex questions to dichotomous judgements, or a series of dichotomies: indeed, the corresponding debate should consider all relevant options on an equal basis. Accordingly, this article questions the propriety of a majoritarian polity, considers a less adversarial voting procedure, and contemplates a more inclusive political structure, in order then to argue that human rights legislations should be far more specific on the subject of democratic rights. Such a development may depend less upon the politician and more upon the lawyer.
A Democratic China?  [PDF]
Peter Emerson
Open Journal of Political Science (OJPS) , 2014, DOI: 10.4236/ojps.2014.43013
Abstract:
Many are the criticisms of those who feel that the one-party state in China is inadequate, and many are the calls, especially from abroad, for reform. But would a democratic Chinaas per a western interpretationbe an improvement? In tackling this question, this paper concentrates on voting procedures: those used in elections and those (which may or may not be the same) used in decision-making. This article first looks at the USSR, Eastern and Central Europe, and then briefly at Africa. Next, it considers what could go wrong if a standard, western, multi-party democracy was to be adopted in China. And finally, it offers a more inclusive polity.
International Peace-Making—Creating Post-Conflict Structures of Government  [PDF]
Peter Emerson
Open Journal of Political Science (OJPS) , 2016, DOI: 10.4236/ojps.2016.62011
Abstract: The means by which ethno-religious conflicts are resolved must themselves be “peace-ful”. So arbitration must be neutral, i.e., international. And discussions must involve not just the combatants but also representatives of those in civil society who are not involved in the conflict. After much shuttle diplomacy perhaps, they must all come together to reach a settlement. In other words, they should talk with each other. If need be, they might also vote, “peace-fully”, not (for-or-)against each other; indeed, most conflicts are binary, so any use of a divisive binary vote is likely to be inappropriate. Instead, they should vote, again with each other, so resort can be made, to an inclusive preferential ballot, and in fact, with such a procedure, an agreement may be more possible. In like manner, the processes by which are chosen, firstly, the above representatives of all of society, and secondly, those who will rule in the initial and subsequent post-conflict administrations, should also be peaceful. Thirdly, the system of governance must allow for the inclusion of all major groupings, and former enemies must come to some sort of arrangement in which power is shared and in which decision-making on all matters of contention involves compromise. Accordingly, this article first reflects on some of the underlying problems in majoritarian structures of governance, for these often exacerbate tensions and, in the worst scenarios, actually provoke conflict. Next, the text considers the principles on which to base a post-conflict society. And finally, it outlines a suitable political structure.
The Will of the People: A Critique of (Simple or Weighted) Majority Voting  [PDF]
Peter Emerson
Open Journal of Political Science (OJPS) , 2017, DOI: 10.4236/ojps.2017.72025
Abstract: Majority voting is the most ancient, primitive, divisive and inaccurate measure of collective opinion ever invented. Yet many people believe it to be the very foundation of democracy. The consequences are widespread. Firstly, the outcomes of binary referendums are often held to be “the will of the people”. Secondly, in the wake of general elections, the new intake of elected representatives then forms a majority administration, with some of them having all the power while others have none. And thirdly, in numerous plural societies, ethno- religious minorities/majorities feel justified in resorting to violence against that which they perceive to be majority/minority oppression. Accordingly, this article first compares binary voting with other decision-making voting procedures before then discussing what could be the methodology, the implications and the potential consequences of a more accurate non-majoritarian procedure.
A Case of Endometriosis in the Abdominal Wall Post Caesarean Section  [PDF]
Emerson Budhoo, Dale Maharaj
Surgical Science (SS) , 2013, DOI: 10.4236/ss.2013.42023
Abstract:

We report the case of a 33 year old female who presented with endometriosis of the anterior abdominal wall following Caesarean Section at the surgical incision site. Abdominal Incisional Site Endometriosis can pose a diagnostic dilema owing to its relative rarity and vagueosity of symptoms, vis-a-vis, cyclical abdominal pain and occasional palpable mass associated with menstruation. A greater index of suspicion should be prompted in such patients especially if symptoms occur following pelvic surgery such as Caesarean Sections, hysterotomy, and myomectomy.

Conventional Coronary Artery Bypass Graft Surgery  [PDF]
Dominic Emerson, Gregory Trachiotis
World Journal of Cardiovascular Surgery (WJCS) , 2016, DOI: 10.4236/wjcs.2016.64010
Abstract: Coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) remains one of the most common procedures worldwide, and remains the gold standard therapy for symptomatic coronary artery disease (CAD) that involves the left main coronary artery, triple vessel CAD with or without left ventricular dysfunction, and other complex coronary CAD not amenable to percutaneous intervention, especially in diabetic patients or those with chronic total coronary occlusion. The majority of CABG operations are performed utilizing cardiopulmonary bypass, though beating heart or off-pump strategies have gained popularity by some surgeons. This review focuses on current technical strategies, and advances in conduit harvest and utility, and fundamental management components of cardiopulmonary bypass and beating heart principles.
The cytokine hypothesis: A neurodevelopmental explanation for the emergence of schizophrenia later in life  [PDF]
Julia Howard
Advances in Bioscience and Biotechnology (ABB) , 2013, DOI: 10.4236/abb.2013.48A2011
Abstract:

There is increasing evidence for the cytokine hypothesis, which states that exposure to elevated cytokines in utero due to maternal immune activation is a major risk factor for the development of schizophrenia later in life. This is supported by numerous epidemicologic studies that connect multiple infections with schizophrenia emergence. Furthermore, cytokines are critically involved in early neurodevelopment and deviations from the norm can result in abnormal neuroanatomy and brain chemistry. Animal models of schizophrenia also support the critical role of developmental neuroinflammation in predisposing the brain to anatomical and behavioral abnormalities. Although there is strong evidence for the critical role of cytokines, they most likely work with other contributing risk factors such as genetic predisposition. New evidence indicates that cytokine exposure in utero may prime the brain and that a second stressor during adolescence, referred to as a second hit, may activate existing developmental vulnerabilities resulting in the emergence of clinical schizophrenia. Further knowledge of these pathogenic processes and risk factors could be very instrumental in reducing risk and slowing emergence of schizophrenia.

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