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Search Results: 1 - 10 of 2231 matches for " Joanna Hlebowicz "
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Effects of Curcuma longa (turmeric) on postprandial plasma glucose and insulin in healthy subjects
Jennie Wickenberg, Sandra Ingemansson, Joanna Hlebowicz
Nutrition Journal , 2010, DOI: 10.1186/1475-2891-9-43
Abstract: Fourteen healthy subjects were assessed in a crossover trial. A standard 75 g oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) was administered together with capsules containing a placebo or C. longa. Finger-prick capillary and venous blood samples were collected before, and 15, 30, 45, 60, 90, and 120 min after the start of the OGTT to measure the glucose and insulin levels, respectively.The ingestion of 6 g C. longa had no significant effect on the glucose response. The change in insulin was significantly higher 30 min (P = 0.03) and 60 min (P = 0.041) after the OGTT including C. longa. The insulin AUCs were also significantly higher after the ingestion of C. longa, 15 (P = 0.048), 30 (P = 0.035), 90 (P = 0.03), and 120 (P = 0.02) minutes after the OGTT.The ingestion of 6 g C. longa increased postprandial serum insulin levels, but did not seem to affect plasma glucose levels or GI, in healthy subjects. The results indicate that C. longa may have an effect on insulin secretion.NCT01029327C. longa (turmeric) is a tropical plant that is cultivated extensively in Asia, India, China, and other countries with a suitable climate. C. longa, is a perennial herb, and a member of the ginger family. It can grow up to 1 m high, and has oblong, tufted leaves. The yellow spice is made from the rhizomes (roots), which are boiled, dried, and then ground [1,2] The active component in turmeric is curcumin, which may constitute 2 to 8% of the spice. Curcumin is a non-water-soluble polyphenol that can be derived from C. longa by ethanol extraction [2]. C. longa has traditionally been used as a coloring agent in Asian cuisine, as well as in cheese, butter, yogurt, and other kinds of food [3].C. longa is used for several purposes apart from flavoring and coloring food. Numerous studies have shown that curcumin has antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties [4]. Recent studies have also indicated that curcumin affects cellular enzymes, and angiogenesis [5,6]. Although curcumin has been used througho
Noninvasive Assessment of Autonomic Cardiovascular Function in Patients after Arterial Switch Operation for Transposition of the Great Arteries  [PDF]
Joanna Hlebowicz, Maja Rooth, Sandra Lindstedt, Johan Holm, Ulf Thilén
Surgical Science (SS) , 2015, DOI: 10.4236/ss.2015.63020
Abstract:

Background: Children born with transposition of the great arteries (TGA) must undergo corrective surgery for survival, arterial switch being the standard surgical procedure. The sympathetic innervation of the heart may be damaged during the operation. This study was designed to determine whether adults who were born with TGA and who had arterial switch operation (ASO) in infancy exhibit denervation of the heart, measured as heart rate variability (HRV) with electrocardiography (ECG). Methods: Nine patients with transposition of the great arteries (four men and five women; mean age 26 ± 1 years) who underwent the ASO at a mean age of 85 ± 35 days, and nine healthy adults (five men and five women; mean age 26 ± 2) were included in the study. Cardiac autonomic nerve function was determined by the variation in RR intervals during maximal deep breathing, monitored by continuous ECG. The mean values were calculated for each group from six inspirations (I) and expirations (E), and the E:I ratios were calculated. Results: The E:I ratio did not differ between patients with an arterial switch and healthy controls (P= 0.161). Two patients had signs of denervation of the heart up to 30 years after the arterial switch operation. Conclusions: Reinnervation of the heartmay take place in patients who have undergone the ASO in infancy, and these patients would not necessarily suffer from autonomic dysfunction. The HRV, measured by ECG, has the potential to identify arterially switched patients at risk of developing silent myocardial ischemia.

Pressure transduction and fluid evacuation during conventional negative pressure wound therapy of the open abdomen and NPWT using a protective disc over the intestines
Sandra Lindstedt, Malin Malmsj?, Johan Hansson, Joanna Hlebowicz, Richard Ingemansson
BMC Surgery , 2012, DOI: 10.1186/1471-2482-12-4
Abstract: Six pigs underwent midline incision and the application of conventional NPWT and NPWT with a protective disc between the intestines and the vacuum source. The pressure transduction was measured centrally beneath the dressing, and at the anterior abdominal wall, before and after the application of topical negative pressures of -50, -70 and -120 mmHg. The drainage of fluid from the abdomen was measured, with and without the protective disc.Abdominal drainage was significantly better (p < 0. 001) using NPWT with the protective disc at -120 mmHg (439 ± 25 ml vs. 239 ± 31 ml), at -70 mmHg (341 ± 27 ml vs. 166 ± 9 ml) and at -50 mmHg (350 ± 50 ml vs. 151 ± 21 ml) than with conventional NPWT. The pressure transduction was more even at all pressure levels using NPWT with the protective disc than with conventional NPWT.The drainage of the open abdomen was significantly more effective when using NWPT with the protective disc than with conventional NWPT. This is believed to be due to the more even and effective pressure transduction in the open abdomen using a protective disc in combination with NPWT.Treatment of open abdomen with negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) in cases of abdominal sepsis and abdominal compartment syndrome results in a high rate of successful abdominal closure [1-5]. The primary goals of wound management include avoidance of mechanical contamination of abdominal viscera, active removal of exudates, estimation of third space fluid loss, and infection control [6]. NPWT involves application of topical negative pressure to the open wound. A non-adhesive perforated plastic barrier is placed over the viscera and extended laterally under the anterior abdominal wall. This first permeable layer is then covered with a polyurethane sponge and sealed with an airtight plastic sheet. An aspiration system is used to apply suction often ranging between 125 and 150 mmHg. The primary goal of this treatment is to remove contaminated fluid from the peritoneal cavity.Temp
Macroscopic changes during negative pressure wound therapy of the open abdomen using conventional negative pressure wound therapy and NPWT with a protective disc over the intestines
Sandra Lindstedt, Malin Malmsj?, Johan Hansson, Joanna Hlebowicz, Richard Ingemansson
BMC Surgery , 2011, DOI: 10.1186/1471-2482-11-10
Abstract: Twelve pigs underwent midline incision. Six animals underwent conventional NPWT, while the other six pigs underwent NPWT with a protective disc inserted between the intestines and the vacuum source. Macroscopic changes were photographed and quantified after 12, 24, and 48 hours of NPWT.The surface of the small intestines was red and mottled as a result of petechial bleeding in the intestinal wall in all cases. After 12, 24 and 48 hours of NPWT, the area of petechial bleeding was significantly larger when using conventional NPWT than when using NPWT with the protective disc (9.7 ± 1.0 cm2 vs. 1.8 ± 0.2 cm2, p < 0.001, 12 hours), (14.5 ± 0.9 cm2 vs. 2.0 ± 0.2 cm2, 24 hours) (17.0 ± 0.7 cm2 vs. 2.5 ± 0.2 cm2 with the disc, p < 0.001, 48 hours)The areas of petechial bleeding in the small intestinal wall were significantly larger following conventional NPWT after 12, 24 and 48 hours, than using NPWT with a protective disc between the intestines and the vacuum source. The protective disc protects the intestines, reducing the amount of petechial bleeding.An injury to the abdomen or abdominal surgery can result in a wound that cannot be closed immediately. It may be necessary to leave the wound open to allow further treatment, or to allow infection to clear. In this type of open abdomen, laparostomy, the internal organs, including the bowel, may be exposed. Treatment of laparostomy with negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) for abdominal sepsis and abdominal compartment syndrome has resulted in a high rate of successful abdominal closure. In addition, patients recover more rapidly. In patients with abdominal compartment syndrome, decompressed laparotomy with temporary closure with NPWT might be crucial, whereas in abdominal sepsis and peritonitis NPWT's draining effect and reduction of bacterial load is thought to be of great importance [1-3]. The primary goals of NWPT of the open abdomen include the avoidance of mechanical contamination of abdominal viscera, active remova
The effect of endogenously released glucose, insulin, glucagon-like peptide 1, ghrelin on cardiac output, heart rate, stroke volume, and blood pressure
Joanna Hlebowicz, Sandra Lindstedt, Ola Bj?rgell, Magnus Dencker
Cardiovascular Ultrasound , 2011, DOI: 10.1186/1476-7120-9-43
Abstract: Eleven healthy men and twelve healthy women ((mean ± SEM) aged: 26 ± 0.2 y; body mass index: 21.8 ± 0.1 kg/m2)) were included in this study. The CO, HR, SV, systolic and diastolic blood pressure, antral area, gastric emptying rate, and glucose, insulin, GLP-1 and ghrelin levels were measured.The CO and SV at 30 min were significantly higher, and the diastolic blood pressure was significantly lower, than the fasting in both men and women (P < 0.05). In men, significant correlations were found between GLP-1 level at 30 min and SV at 30 min (P = 0.015, r = 0.946), and between ghrelin levels and HR (P = 0.013, r = 0.951) at 110 min. Significant correlations were also found between the change in glucose level at 30 min and the change in systolic blood pressure (P = 0.021, r = -0.681), and the change in SV (P = 0.008, r = -0.748) relative to the fasting in men. The insulin 0-30 min AUC was significantly correlated to the CO 0-30 min AUC (P = 0.002, r = 0.814) in men. Significant correlations were also found between the 0-120 min ghrelin and HR AUCs (P = 0.007, r = 0.966) in men. No statistically significant correlations were seen in women.Physiological changes in the levels of glucose, insulin, GLP-1 and ghrelin may influence the activity of the heart and the blood pressure. There may also be gender-related differences in the haemodynamic responses to postprandial changes in hormone levels. The results of this study show that subjects should not eat immediately prior to, or during, the evaluation of cardiovascular interventions as postprandial affects may affect the results, leading to erroneous interpretation of the cardiovascular effects of the primary intervention.NCT01027507Several kinds of postprandial cardiovascular changes have been reported in the literature. The postprandial blood flow in the superior mesenteric artery (SMA) seems to be approximately double the fasting value, and initiates an increase in cardiac output (CO) [1]. Postprandial CO increase has been
Relationship between postprandial changes in cardiac left ventricular function, glucose and insulin concentrations, gastric emptying, and satiety in healthy subjects
Joanna Hlebowicz, Sandra Lindstedt, Ola Bj?rgell, Magnus Dencker
Nutrition Journal , 2011, DOI: 10.1186/1475-2891-10-26
Abstract: Twenty-three healthy subjects were included in this study. The fasting and postprandial changes at 30 min and 110 min in CO, heart rate (HR) and blood pressure were measured. Moreover, tissue Doppler imaging systolic (S'), early (E') and late (A') mitral annular diastolic velocities were measured in the septal (s) and lateral (l) walls. Glucose and insulin concentrations, and satiety were measured before and 15, 30, 45, 60, 90, and 120 min after the start of the meal. The GER was calculated as the percentage change in the antral cross-sectional area 15-90 min after ingestion of the meal.This study show that both CO, systolic longitudinal ventricular velocity of the septum (S's) and lateral wall (S'l), the early diastolic longitudinal ventricular velocity of the lateral wall (E'l), the late diastolic longitudinal ventricular velocity of the septum (A's) and lateral wall (A'l) increase significantly, and were concomitant with increased satiety, antral area, glucose and insulin levels. The CO, HR and SV at 30 min were significantly higher, and the diastolic blood pressure was significantly lower, than the fasting. The satiety was correlated to HR and diastolic blood pressure. The insulin level was correlated to HR.This study shows that postprandial CO, HR, SV and LV longitudinal systolic and diastolic functions increase concomitantly with increased satiety, antral area, and glucose and insulin levels. Therefore, patients should not eat prior to, or during, cardiac evaluation as the effects of a meal may affect the results and their interpretation.ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT01027507The digestion of food is known to alter the hemodynamics of the body significantly. Following a meal, the blood flow to the gastrointestinal organs increases, affecting the heart rate (HR), blood pressure, and cardiac output (CO). The mechanisms causing the change in heart function after a meal are not known. These postprandial cardiovascular changes have been shown to resemble the effects of vas
Does green tea affect postprandial glucose, insulin and satiety in healthy subjects: a randomized controlled trial
Julija Josic, Anna Olsson, Jennie Wickeberg, Sandra Lindstedt, Joanna Hlebowicz
Nutrition Journal , 2010, DOI: 10.1186/1475-2891-9-63
Abstract: The study was conducted on 14 healthy volunteers, with a crossover design. Participants were randomized to either 300 ml of green tea or water. This was consumed together with a breakfast consisting of white bread and sliced turkey. Blood samples were drawn at 0, 15, 30, 45, 60, 90, and 120 minutes. Participants completed several different satiety score scales at the same times.Plasma glucose levels were higher 120 min after ingestion of the meal with green tea than after the ingestion of the meal with water. No significant differences were found in serum insulin levels, or the area under the curve for glucose or insulin. Subjects reported significantly higher satiety, having a less strong desire to eat their favorite food and finding it less pleasant to eat another mouthful of the same food after drinking green tea compared to water.Green tea showed no glucose or insulin-lowering effect. However, increased satiety and fullness were reported by the participants after the consumption of green tea.NCT01086189Tea is the second most commonly consumed beverage worldwide after water. Green tea is produced from the plant Camellia sinensis. The compounds thought to contribute to the health-promoting effects ascribed to green tea are polyphenolic compounds called catechins [1]. There are four major catechins in green tea: epicatechin (EC), epicatechin gallate (ECG), epigallocatechin (EGC) and epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG), of which EGCG is the most abundant. The focus of many previous studies on green tea has been on the anti-oxidative properties of catechins, and their potential role in preventing cancer and cardiovascular disease [2]. Green tea may also have a beneficial effect on glucose tolerance and the risk of developing diabetes. In a large cohort study on green tea, frequent consumption was found to be inversely associated with the risk of type 2 diabetes among Japanese women [3]. A cross-sectional study in Japan revealed an inverse correlation between daily consum
A compare between myocardial topical negative pressure levels of -25 mmHg and -50 mmHg in a porcine model
Sandra Lindstedt, Per Paulsson, Arash Mokhtari, Bodil Gesslein, Joanna Hlebowicz, Malin Malmsj?, Richard Ingemansson
BMC Cardiovascular Disorders , 2008, DOI: 10.1186/1471-2261-8-14
Abstract: Six pigs underwent median sternotomy. The microvascular blood flow in the myocardium was recorded before and after the application of TNP using laser Doppler flowmetry. Analyses were performed before left anterior descending artery (LAD) occlusion (normal myocardium), and after 20 minutes of LAD occlusion (ischemic myocardium).A TNP of -25 mmHg significantly increased microvascular blood flow in both normal (from 263.3 ± 62.8 PU before, to 380.0 ± 80.6 PU after TNP application, * p = 0.03) and ischemic myocardium (from 58.8 ± 17.7 PU before, to 85.8 ± 20.9 PU after TNP application, * p = 0.04). A TNP of -50 mmHg also significantly increased microvascular blood flow in both normal (from 174.2 ± 20.8 PU before, to 240.0 ± 34.4 PU after TNP application, * p = 0.02) and ischemic myocardium (from 44.5 ± 14.0 PU before, to 106.2 ± 26.6 PU after TNP application, ** p = 0.01).Topical negative pressure of -25 mmHg and -50 mmHg both induced a significant increase in microvascular blood flow in normal and in ischemic myocardium. The increase in microvascular blood flow was larger when using -25 mmHg on normal myocardium, and was larger when using -50 mmHg on ischemic myocardium; however these differences were not statistically significant.TNP promotes wound healing by stimulating wound edge blood flow, as has been shown in both peripheral [1] and in skeletal muscle in sternotomy wounds[2]. TNP produces a mechanical stress and a pressure gradient across the tissue which may cause a surge of blood to the area. Mechanical forces and increased blood flow are known to stimulate granulation tissue formation, i.e. endothelial proliferation, capillary budding and angiogenesis[3,4].Poststernotomy mediastinitis is a strong predictor for poor long-term survival after coronary artery by-pass surgery (CABG), when using conventional wound healing techniques (closed irrigation, delayed wound closure, or reconstructing with omentum or pectoral flaps)[5,6]. Braxton and coworkers demonstrated t
Effect of apple cider vinegar on delayed gastric emptying in patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus: a pilot study
Joanna Hlebowicz, Gassan Darwiche, Ola Bj?rgell, Lars-Olof Almér
BMC Gastroenterology , 2007, DOI: 10.1186/1471-230x-7-46
Abstract: Ten patients with type 1 diabetes and diabetic gastroparesis, including one patient who had undergone vagotomy, were included and completed the investigator blinded crossover trial. The gastric emptying rate (GER) was measured using standardized real-time ultrasonography. The GER was calculated as the percentage change in the antral cross-sectional area 15 and 90 minutes after ingestion of 300 g rice pudding and 200 ml water (GER1), or 300 g rice pudding and 200 ml water with 30 ml apple cider vinegar (GER2). The subjects drank 200 ml water daily before breakfast one week before the measurement of GER1. The same subjects drank 200 ml water with 30 ml vinegar daily before breakfast for two weeks before the measurement of GER2.The median values of GER1 and GER2 were 27% and 17%, respectively. The effect of vinegar on the rate of gastric emptying was statistically significant (p < 0.05).This study shows that vinegar affects insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus patients with diabetic gastroparesis by reducing the gastric emptying rate even further, and this might be a disadvantage regarding to their glycaemic control.ISRCTN33841495.Diabetes mellitus is a growing problem globally. According to recent estimates there were over 171 million people living with diabetes worldwide in 2000, and the number is estimated to increase to 366 million by 2030 [1]. Studies have shown that 30–50% of diabetes patients have delayed gastric emptying and this is believed to be, at least partially, due to vagal denervation caused by autonomic neuropathy [2-6]. Delayed gastric emptying may cause poor glycaemic control, especially in those with preprandial antidiabetic treatment leading to/causing postprandial hypoglycaemia and gastrointestinal symptoms such as postprandial nausea, vomiting, bloating and early satiety [7]. The relationship between the symptoms of gastroparesis and the rate of gastric emptying is weak, and patients with delayed gastric emptying may not have any, or few, gastroin
Why Care about L napei lixs wakàn? Ethnography of the Lenape Language Loss
Bartosz Hlebowicz
Journal on Ethnopolitics and Minority Issues in Europe , 2012,
Abstract: The Delaware Tribe of Oklahoma, which originated in the Northeastern Woodlands, today struggles to preserve the Lenape language of their ancestors, whose last fluent native speaker died in 2002. The tribe's language reclamation efforts are in large part connected with the works of Jim Rementer, a non-Indian who came to live with them at the beginning of the 1960s, learned their language, and in the course of time became the director of their language project. However, the 'old ways' - former cultural patterns - have long since been abandoned or dramatically changed, and together with them their attachment to the language. Those few Delawares who do try to learn it must study it as a second language, without a natural/traditional learning setting. The 11,000 Delawares live, go to school and work among a much larger non-native society, which makes mastering the language extremely difficulty. Yet, despite this situation, effotrts to protect the language continue to be made, and an impressive source base for contemporary and future learners (Delaware language grammar, internet dictionary, CD lessons) has been contrinually enlarged. Today, when political divisions within the tribe weaken the community cohesiveness, a well documented language, 'alive in Delawares' minds', remains one of the most valuable elements of their heritage, a source of their ethnic pride, but also a challenge.
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