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Search Results: 1 - 10 of 25279 matches for " Jinu Lee "
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Responses of weed community and soil biota to cessation of fertilization
Jinu Eo
Journal of Ecology and Field Biology , 2010,
Abstract: Nutrient availability is a critical component of agroecosystems, and is relevant to both above- and below- groundinteractions. The principal objective of this study was to determine how the cessation of fertilization affects the communitiesof weeds and soil organisms in a corn/wheat field. Changes in dominant weed species, substrate-induced respiration,and the population density of nematodes and microarthropods were evaluated. Microbial substrate-inducedrespiration (SIR) and the population density of microarthropods decreased following the cessation of fertilization andwere partly correlated with the aboveground weed biomass. The cessation of organic fertilizer application but continuingapplication of inorganic fertilizer reduced the population density of nematodes. In response to the cessation offertilization, weed communities were dominated by species with little dependency on fertilization. Amaranthus retroflexuswas identified as the most dominant species in the corn field; however, it was replaced by Digitaria ciliaris afterthe cessation of fertilization. In the wheat field, the cessation of fertilization led to a rapid reduction in the biomass ofmost weeds, except for Vicia angustifolia, supposedly as the result of symbiotic nitrogen fixation. Additionally, the factthat weed biomass was partially correlated with SIR or the population density of microarthropods may reflect a mutualfeedback between soil organisms and weeds. The results indicate that the cessation of fertilization alters communities ofweeds and soil organisms through changes in weed biomass and interactions with symbiotic microorganisms.
Defending Network-based Services Against Denial of Service Attacks
Jinu Kurian,Kamil Sarac
International Journal of Network Security , 2009,
Abstract: Over the last decade, several value-added services have been proposed for deployment in the Internet. Many of these services (e.g. IP Multicast) are stateful services introducing state maintenance overhead into the network for their operation. This characteristic makes these services vulnerable to a specific type of denial-of-service (DoS) attacks called state overload attack. In this paper, we examine state overload attacks in value-added services and in particular IP multicast. We describe why these attacks are possible and present two solutions to prevent them. In both cases, we describe the solutions, evaluate their overhead, and outline incremental deployment strategies for their deployment.
dTULP, the Drosophila melanogaster Homolog of Tubby, Regulates Transient Receptor Potential Channel Localization in Cilia
Jina Park equal contributor,Jeongmi Lee equal contributor,Jaewon Shim,Woongsu Han,Jinu Lee,Yong Chul Bae,Yun Doo Chung,Chul Hoon Kim ,Seok Jun Moon
PLOS Genetics , 2013, DOI: 10.1371/journal.pgen.1003814
Abstract: Mechanically gated ion channels convert sound into an electrical signal for the sense of hearing. In Drosophila melanogaster, several transient receptor potential (TRP) channels have been implicated to be involved in this process. TRPN (NompC) and TRPV (Inactive) channels are localized in the distal and proximal ciliary zones of auditory receptor neurons, respectively. This segregated ciliary localization suggests distinct roles in auditory transduction. However, the regulation of this localization is not fully understood. Here we show that the Drosophila Tubby homolog, King tubby (hereafter called dTULP) regulates ciliary localization of TRPs. dTULP-deficient flies show uncoordinated movement and complete loss of sound-evoked action potentials. Inactive and NompC are mislocalized in the cilia of auditory receptor neurons in the dTulp mutants, indicating that dTULP is required for proper cilia membrane protein localization. This is the first demonstration that dTULP regulates TRP channel localization in cilia, and suggests that dTULP is a protein that regulates ciliary neurosensory functions.
Preclinical Testing of Erlotinib in a Transgenic Alveolar Rhabdomyosarcoma Mouse Model
Jinu Abraham,Laura D. Nelon,Courtney B. Kubicek,Aoife Kilcoyne,Sheila T. Hampton,Lee Ann Zarzabal,Francis J. Giles,Joel E. Michalek,Brian P. Rubin,Charles Keller
Sarcoma , 2011, DOI: 10.1155/2011/130484
Abstract: Rhabdomyosarcoma is an aggressive childhood malignancy, accounting for more than 50% of all soft-tissue sarcomas in children. Even with extensive therapy, the survival rate among alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma patients with advanced disease is only 20%. The receptor tyrosine kinase Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR) has been found to be expressed and activated in human rhabdomyosarcomas. In this study we have used a genetically engineered mouse model for alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma (ARMS) which faithfully recapitulates the human disease by activating the pathognomic Pax3:Fkhr fusion gene and inactivating p53 in the maturing myoblasts. We have demonstrated that tumors from our mouse model of alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma express EGFR at both the mRNA and protein levels. We then tested the EGFR inhibitor, Erlotinib, for its efficacy in this mouse model of alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma. Surprisingly, Erlotinib had no effect on tumor progression, yet mice treated with Erlotinib showed 10–20% loss of body weight. These results suggest that EGFR might not be an a priori monotherapy target in alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma.
Preclinical Testing of Erlotinib in a Transgenic Alveolar Rhabdomyosarcoma Mouse Model
Jinu Abraham,Laura D. Nelon,Courtney B. Kubicek,Aoife Kilcoyne,Sheila T. Hampton,Lee Ann Zarzabal,Francis J. Giles,Joel E. Michalek,Brian P. Rubin,Charles Keller
Sarcoma , 2011, DOI: 10.1155/2011/130484
Abstract: Rhabdomyosarcoma is an aggressive childhood malignancy, accounting for more than 50% of all soft-tissue sarcomas in children. Even with extensive therapy, the survival rate among alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma patients with advanced disease is only 20%. The receptor tyrosine kinase Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR) has been found to be expressed and activated in human rhabdomyosarcomas. In this study we have used a genetically engineered mouse model for alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma (ARMS) which faithfully recapitulates the human disease by activating the pathognomic Pax3:Fkhr fusion gene and inactivating p53 in the maturing myoblasts. We have demonstrated that tumors from our mouse model of alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma express EGFR at both the mRNA and protein levels. We then tested the EGFR inhibitor, Erlotinib, for its efficacy in this mouse model of alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma. Surprisingly, Erlotinib had no effect on tumor progression, yet mice treated with Erlotinib showed 10–20% loss of body weight. These results suggest that EGFR might not be an a priori monotherapy target in alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma. 1. Introduction Alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma (ARMS) is an aggressive soft-tissue sarcoma with myogenic features that has a very poor prognosis in children because of high metastatic potential and poor response to chemotherapy [1]. The survival rate for children with metastatic alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma is dismal even with the tremendous improvements in multimodality treatment [2, 3]. Recent studies have shown that molecularly targeted therapies can be very successful in treating malignant diseases like chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) and gastrointestinal stromal tumors [4, 5]. Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is a receptor tyrosine kinase that has been shown to be expressed or activated in 32–50% of alveolar and 31–55% of embryonal rhabdomyosarcoma [6, 7]. Furthermore, the tyrosine-kinase inhibitor Erlotinib inhibits EGFR and is an FDA approved drug for the treatment of advanced non-small cell lung carcinoma [8, 9]. In the current study we have tested the preclinical efficacy of Erlotinib in treating alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma (ARMS) using a genetically engineered mouse model of ARMS. 2. Methods 2.1. Mice, Drug Administration, and Tumor Monitoring All animal procedures were conducted in accordance with the Guidelines for the Care and Use of Laboratory Animals and were approved by the Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee (IACUC) at the University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio and the Oregon Health & Science University. The
A STUDY ON ETHNOMEDICINAL USES OF PLANTS IN DHEMAJI DISTRICT OF ASSAM WITH SPECIAL REFERENCE TO REPRODUCTIVE HEALTH
Lagachu Jinu,Kalita Jogen Chandra
International Research Journal of Pharmacy , 2013, DOI: 10.7897/2230-8407.04356
Abstract: The present paper deals with the documentation of ethnomedicinal uses of plants and parts, particularly the fertility and anti-fertility plants used by the Misings, Kacharis & Chutias of Dhemaji district of Assam, India. Dhemaji is situated between the 94°12’18’’ E & 95°41’32’’ E longitudes & 27°05’27’’ N & 27°57’16’’ N latitudes, the district covers an area of 3237 sq.km & is a basically plain area lying at an altitude of 104 m above the mean sea level. It is inhabited by large number of indigenous tribes, namely, Mishings, Kacharis, Bodos, Deoris….etc. Survey was carried out during the period January 2011 to July 2012, in 12 villages to investigate about the above mentioned indigenous medicinal plants used for the management and cure of female reproductive health problems. Total 11 species of plants were reported. It is observed that in majority of cases, plants are mixed together and consumed.
In vitro micropropagation of Alpinia zerumbet Variegate, an important medicinal plant, through rhizome bud explants
Rakkimuthu, R.,,Jinu Jacob,K. M. Aravinthan
Research in Biotechnology , 2011,
Abstract: An ideal Micropropagation method of Alpinia zerumbet has been developed usingrhizome bud explants. Basal MS medium supplemented with 3% sucrose (w/v) differentconcentrations of BAP in combination with 0.5 mg / L of kinetin. Highest percentage (95%) ofexplants for shoot induction and multiple shoot (7.9 per explants) production were observedin the combination of 1.5 mg / L of BAP, 0.5 mg / L of kinetin. In this case, all the inoculatedexplants induced multiple shoots within 6-7 weeks of inoculation. Rooting was induced in amedium having half strength MS supplemented with 0.5mg / L of IBA. Most of the generatedshoots were successfully transferred to soil under field conditions.
A report on anthelmintic activity of Cassia tora leaves
Jinu John,Archana Mehta,Shruti Shukla,Pradeep Mehta
Songklanakarin Journal of Science and Technology , 2009,
Abstract: Methanolic extract and its ethyl acetate fraction of Cassia tora L. leaves were evaluated for anthelmintic property using the Indian adult earthworm (Pheretima posthuma) as a model. Among the earthworms the ethyl acetate fraction was potent. The results were compared with a standard drug, albendazole. The phytochemical analysis of both extracts showed the presence of phenolics like flavonoids and tannins as well as anthraquinones, which may be the active principle. The present study confirms the ethno-medicinal report of the plant as an anthelmintic drug.
FAILURE ANALYSIS ON T 92 STEEL TUBE AND COMPARED WITH PREDICTED NUMBER OF CYCLES TO FAILURE USING COFFIN-MANSON EQUATION
G.R.Jinu,,P.Sathiya
International Journal of Engineering Science and Technology , 2010,
Abstract: This phenomenon is termed as ‘thermal fatigue’. In this paper, a laboratory simulation for reproducing thermal fatigue phenomenon is developed to determine the number of cycles tend of failure occurring in tubes and compared with predicted number of cycles tend to failure using Coffin-Manson equation at a particular temperature. The theoretically obtained strain values are also validated with simulated results from ANSYS software for the applied temperature condition. Thermal fatigue test was conducted in the Non Destructive Test (NDT) cleared T92 base tubes. The tube was subjected to thermal cycles from 800oC (accelerated temperature) to room temperature. Oxyacetylene flame was utilised as a heating source, whereas a water bath was utilised for quenching purpose. The test is carried out until open cracks were identified. Surface cracks are identified in the base tubes after 90 cycles. In base tubes lot of longitudinal cracks and transverse cracks are identified on the heating zone. The tube is then sectioned and subjected to optical microscopy, Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) and Energy Dispersive X-Ray Analysis (EDAX). Cracks and cavities are observed in the base tube. A comparison of predicted thermal fatigue lives with experimental results shows the deviation of 7 cycles. Bulging on the tube heated surface is identified in both the experimental and simulated results this shows that the developed model is showing good agreement withthe experimental results. Comparison of the experimental and simulated strain results shows the maximum deviation of 7.5%. This study reveals that localised heating and cooling cause’s thermal fatigue, which initiates cracks in the tubes .
Torsade de Pointes due to Methadone Use in a Patient with HIV and Hepatitis C Coinfection
Jinu John,Xixi Amley,Gabriel Bombino,Chaim Gitelis,Bernard Topi,Gerald Hollander,Joydeep Ghosh
Cardiology Research and Practice , 2010, DOI: 10.4061/2010/524764
Abstract: We present a case of Torsade de Pointes secondary to multiple factors including patient susceptibility and iatrogenic influences. Contributing causes are presented, and the approach to treatment is discussed. 1. Case Report A 50-year-old male with a past history of HIV infection, acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS), pneumocystis carinii pneumonia, hepatitis C, and hepatoma (postradiofrequency ablation) presented to the emergency room for weakness and syncope which occurred in the bathroom while straining to defecate. He denied palpitation, chest pain, or shortness of breath prior to losing consciousness. There was no history of seizure disorder. The following day while walking to the hospital, he developed lightheadedness again which was associated with diaphoresis and had to hold onto a pole for support for two minutes before feeling able to continue. There was a history of cocaine and IV heroin abuse (discontinued two years ago). Prehospital medications included lamivudine/zidovudine, atazanavir, trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole, and methadone. He was on antiretroviral drugs for 10 years, and the methadone dosage was increased to 40?mg/day two months prior to this presentation. On admission in the ER, he had a regularly irregular pulse and a blood pressure of 124/60. Physical examination was unremarkable except for ecchymosis in the left periorbital region. Relevant lab reports produced the following results: MCV 131?FL, platelet count 82,000/mm3, AST 176?IU/L, alkaline phosphatase 140?IU/L, ALT 104?IU/L, albumin 3.2?g/dL, and INR 1.3. Serum potassium, magnesium, corrected calcium, and cardiac enzymes were within normal range. The patient’s chest X-ray was unremarkable. EKG recorded 14 months prior to the ER presentation showed sinus rhythm and QTc 455?ms (Figure 1). The initial EKG on presentation showed ventricular bigeminy (Figure 2) with QTc 550?ms. In the ER, he developed two episodes of TdP (Figure 3) each resolving spontaneously, although the patient became unconscious for approximately two minutes during each episode. He was given 2?g Magnesium IV and Amiodarone IV push 150?mg twice. The patient was transferred to cardiac ICU. HIV medications were switched to raltegravir, emtricitabine/tenofovir; methadone was discontinued. Three days later, he developed sinus bradycardia at 38?beats per min (bpm) with QTc 571?ms (Figure 4). To shorten his QTc and prevent further episodes of TdP, the patient underwent a temporary pacemaker insertion and was paced at a rate of 100?bpm (Figure 5). After two days, his QTc slowly decreased and sinus
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