oalib

Publish in OALib Journal

ISSN: 2333-9721

APC: Only $99

Submit

Search Results: 1 - 10 of 3448 matches for " Jeremy Shears "
All listed articles are free for downloading (OA Articles)
Page 1 /3448
Display every page Item
Ernest Elliott Markwick: variable stars and military campaigns
Jeremy Shears
Physics , 2011,
Abstract: Colonel E.E. Markwick, CB, CBE, FRAS (1853 - 1925) pursued a distinguished career in the British Army, serving in Great Britain and other parts of the Empire and rising to the rank of Colonel. He was an original member of the BAA and went on to become President between 1912 and 1914. His main observational interest was the study of variable stars and he independently discovered two variables, RY Sgr and T Cen. He directed the BAA Variable Star Section from 1899 to 1909, organising its work along lines that are largely pursued even to this day and which other variable star organisations around the world have emulated.
Thomas Hinsley Astbury: from an English market town schoolroom to the internal constitution of the stars
Jeremy Shears
Physics , 2012,
Abstract: T. H. Astbury (1858-1922) was for many years the much-respected headmaster of a boys' junior school in the English market town of Wallingford. By night he was a dedicated amateur astronomer who enjoyed observing meteors, variable stars and many other objects. He began to search few new variable stars, his first discovery being the bright Cepheid variable, RT Aurigae. This, along with his discovery of 4 other variable stars, brought him to attention of some of the most famous professional astronomers of the age, including Herbert Hall Turner, Frank Dyson and Arthur Eddington.
John Ellard Gore: of immensity and minuteness
Jeremy Shears
Physics , 2012,
Abstract: John Ellard Gore FRAS, MRIA (1845-1910) was an Irish amateur astronomer and prolific author of popular astronomy books. His main observational interest was variable stars, of which he discovered several, and he served as the first Director of the BAA Variable Star Section. He was also interested in binary stars, leading him to calculate orbital elements of many such systems. He demonstrated that the companion of Sirius, thought by many to be a dark body, was in fact self luminous. In doing so he provided the first indication of the immense density of what later became known as white dwarfs.
The Reverend Walter Bidlake of Crewe
Jeremy Shears
Physics , 2013,
Abstract: The Reverend Walter Bidlake, MA, FRAS, JP (1865-1938) was vicar of Crewe, England, for some 21 years. A member of the BAA, he was a keen amateur astronomer with an interest in celestial photography. At the request of another well-known BAA member, T.H.E.C. Espin, Bidlake took photographs of the night sky in support of Espin's search for dark nebulae in the Milky Way. This paper describes Bidlake's astronomical activities and life, including a high profile libel case he brought.
Frank McClean and the Ferncliffe Observatory at Tunbridge Wells
Jeremy Shears
Physics , 2013,
Abstract: This short note describes the observatory of the pioneering spectroscopist, Frank McClean (1837-1907), at Tunbridge Wells in England
The British Astronomical Association and the Great War of 1914-1918
Jeremy Shears
Physics , 2013,
Abstract: Marking the centenary of the outbreak of the First World War, this paper considers the effect of the war on the BAA and pays tribute to some of its members who were involved in the conflict.
David Elijah Packer: cluster variables, meteors and the solar corona
Jeremy Shears
Physics , 2014,
Abstract: David Elijah Packer (1862-1936), a librarian by profession, was an enthusiastic amateur astronomer who observed from London and Birmingham. He first came to the attention of the astronomical community in 1890 when he discovered a variable star in the globular cluster M5, only the second periodic variable to be discovered in a globular cluster. He also observed meteors and nebulae, on one occasion reporting a brightening in the nucleus of the galaxy M77. However, his remarkable claims in 1896 that he had photographed the solar corona in daylight were soon shown to be flawed.
The controversial pen of Edwin Holmes
Jeremy Shears
Physics , 2014,
Abstract: Edwin Alfred Holmes (1839 -1919) is best remembered for his discovery of a bright comet in 1892, now known as Comet 17P/Holmes. An amateur astronomer and authority on optics, he was an original member of the BAA and contributed to its Journal and meetings for many years. As a prolific writer of letters to the English Mechanic, he developed a reputation for his controversial and acerbic penmanship.
Felix de Roy: a life of variable stars
Jeremy Shears
Physics , 2010,
Abstract: Felix de Roy (1883-1942), an internationality recognised amateur astronomer, made significant contributions to variable star research. As an active observer, he made some 91,000 visual estimates of a number of different variable stars. A Belgian national, he took refuge in England during World War 1. While there, de Roy became well enough known to later serve as Director of the BAA Variable Star Section for seventeen years. Through this office, and his connections with other organisations around the world, he encouraged others to pursue the observation of variable stars. Not merely content to accumulate observational data, de Roy also analysed the data and published numerous papers.
F.W. Longbottom: astronomical photographer and founder of the Chester Astronomical Society
Jeremy Shears
Physics , 2012,
Abstract: Frederick William Longbottom FRAS (1850-1933) was an original member of the British Astronomical Association and served as Director of its Photographic Section between 1906 and 1926. A hop merchant by trade, he spent much of his life in Chester where he was instrumental in founding the City's first astronomical society in 1892.
Page 1 /3448
Display every page Item


Home
Copyright © 2008-2017 Open Access Library. All rights reserved.