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Search Results: 1 - 10 of 56512 matches for " Jennifer Y.; Guirguis "
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Patients′ blood pressure knowledge, perceptions and monitoring practices in community pharmacies
Lam,Jennifer Y.; Guirguis,Lisa M.;
Pharmacy Practice (Internet) , 2010, DOI: 10.4321/S1886-36552010000300006
Abstract: hypertension is a modifiable risk factor for cardiovascular disease. despite this, patients often cannot or inaccurately estimate their risk factors. objectives: in order to improve pharmacist interventions, we sought to: 1) find out patients′ knowledge about blood pressure (bp) and their self- monitoring behaviors and 2) identify the relationships between these two elements. specifically, if evaluation of bp control were related to knowledge of one′s bp level and self-monitoring habits, and if knowledge of one′s target and bp level varied with monitoring habits. methods: final year pharmacy students were trained and interviewed patients in community pharmacies as a required exercise in their pharmacy clerkship. each student recruited a convenience sample of 5-10 patients who were on hypertension medication, and surveyed them regarding their bp targets, recent bp levels as well as monthly and home bp monitoring practices. results: one third of the 449 patients interviewed were able to report a blood pressure target with 26% reporting a jnc 7 recognized target. three quarters of patients who reported a blood pressure target were able to report a blood pressure level, with 12% being at their self- reported target. roughly two thirds of patients perceived their bp to be "about right", and slightly less than a third thought it to be "high". sixty percent of patients monitor their bp monthly, but less than 50% of patients practice home bp monitoring. conclusions: this study along with others before it point to the knowledge and self-management gaps in patients with chronic conditions. furthermore, pharmacy students were able to use a brief intervention to screen patients during routine care. pharmacists can help improve patient understanding and promote increased self-management through regular bp monitoring.
Thermal and structural studies of poly (vinyl alcohol) and hydroxypropyl cellulose blends  [PDF]
Osiris W. Guirguis, Manal T. H. Moselhey
Natural Science (NS) , 2012, DOI: 10.4236/ns.2012.41009
Abstract: Polymers and polymeric composites have steadily reflected their importance in our daily life. Blending poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) with a potentially useful natural biopolymers such as hydroxypropyl cellulose (HPC) seems to be an interesting way of preparing a polymeric blends. In the present work, blends of PVA/HPC of compositions (100/0, 90/10, 75/25, 50/50, 25/75, and 0/100 wt/wt%) were prepared to be used as bioequivalent materials. Thermal analyses [differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA)], and X-ray diffraction (XRD) were employed to characterize and reveal the miscibility map and the structural properties of such blend system. The obtained results of the thermal analyses showed variations in the glass transition temperature (Tg) indicating the miscibility of the blend systems. Moreover, the changes in the melting temperature (Tm), shape and area were attributed to the different degrees of crystallinity and the existence of polymer-polymer interactions between PVA and HPC molecules. The X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis showed broadening and sharpening of peaks at different HPC concentrations with PVA. This indicated changes in the crystallinity/amorphosity ratio, and also suggested that the miscibility between the amorphous components of homo-polymers PVA and HPC is possible. The results showed that HPC doped in PVA film can improve the thermal stability of the film under investigation, leading to interesting technological applications.
Primary User-aware Network Coding for Multi-hop Cognitive Radio Networks
Arsany Guirguis,Raymond Guirguis,Moustafa Youssef
Computer Science , 2014,
Abstract: Network coding has proved its efficiency in increasing the network performance for traditional ad-hoc networks. In this paper, we investigate using network coding for enhancing the throughput of multi-hop cognitive radio networks. We formulate the network coding throughput maximization problem as a graph theory problem, where different constraints and primary users' characteristics are mapped to the graph structure. We then show that the optimal solution to this problem in NP-hard and propose a heuristic algorithm to efficiently solve it. Evaluation of the proposed algorithm through NS2 simulations shows that we can increase the throughput of the constrained secondary users' network by 150\% to 200\% for a wide range of scenarios covering different primary users' densities, traffic loads, and spectrum availability.
Patients’ blood pressure knowledge, perceptions and monitoring practices in community pharmacies
Lam JY,Guirguis LM
Pharmacy Practice (Granada) , 2010,
Abstract: Hypertension is a modifiable risk factor for cardiovascular disease. Despite this, patients often cannot or inaccurately estimate their risk factors.Objectives: In order to improve pharmacist interventions, we sought to: 1) find out patients’ knowledge about blood pressure (BP) and their self- monitoring behaviors and 2) identify the relationships between these two elements. Specifically, if evaluation of BP control were related to knowledge of one’s BP level and self-monitoring habits, and if knowledge of one’s target and BP level varied with monitoring habits. Methods: Final year pharmacy students were trained and interviewed patients in community pharmacies as a required exercise in their pharmacy clerkship. Each student recruited a convenience sample of 5-10 patients who were on hypertension medication, and surveyed them regarding their BP targets, recent BP levels as well as monthly and home BP monitoring practices. Results: One third of the 449 patients interviewed were able to report a blood pressure target with 26% reporting a JNC 7 recognized target. Three quarters of patients who reported a blood pressure target were able to report a blood pressure level, with 12% being at their self- reported target. Roughly two thirds of patients perceived their BP to be “about right”, and slightly less than a third thought it to be “high”. Sixty percent of patients monitor their BP monthly, but less than 50% of patients practice home BP monitoring. Conclusions: This study along with others before it point to the knowledge and self-management gaps in patients with chronic conditions. Furthermore, pharmacy students were able to use a brief intervention to screen patients during routine care. Pharmacists can help improve patient understanding and promote increased self-management through regular BP monitoring.
Book Review: Rachel Scott. The Challenge of Political Islam: Non-Muslims and the Egyptian State. Stanford: Stanford University Press, 2010.
Fatin Morris Guirguis
Journal of International and Global Studies , 2011,
Abstract:
Stuck in Traffic (SiT) Attacks: A Framework for Identifying Stealthy Attacks that Cause Traffic Congestion
Mina Guirguis,George Atia
Computer Science , 2012,
Abstract: Recent advances in wireless technologies have enabled many new applications in Intelligent Transportation Systems (ITS) such as collision avoidance, cooperative driving, congestion avoidance, and traffic optimization. Due to the vulnerable nature of wireless communication against interference and intentional jamming, ITS face new challenges to ensure the reliability and the safety of the overall system. In this paper, we expose a class of stealthy attacks -- Stuck in Traffic (SiT) attacks -- that aim to cause congestion by exploiting how drivers make decisions based on smart traffic signs. An attacker mounting a SiT attack solves a Markov Decision Process problem to find optimal/suboptimal attack policies in which he/she interferes with a well-chosen subset of signals that are based on the state of the system. We apply Approximate Policy Iteration (API) algorithms to derive potent attack policies. We evaluate their performance on a number of systems and compare them to other attack policies including random, myopic and DoS attack policies. The generated policies, albeit suboptimal, are shown to significantly outperform other attack policies as they maximize the expected cumulative reward from the standpoint of the attacker.
Pediatric Continuous Brachial Plexus Catheter for a Case of Complex Regional Pain Syndrome (CRPS)  [PDF]
Reda Tolba, Rhamee Badr, Maged Guirguis, Loran Mounir Soliman
Open Journal of Anesthesiology (OJAnes) , 2015, DOI: 10.4236/ojanes.2015.51001
Abstract: Introduction: Complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) is a disorder characterized by pain as well as a myriad of sensory, autonomic, and motor disturbances. We are reporting a case of child diagnosed with CRPS and successfully treated with supraclavicular brachial plexus catheter infusion of local anesthetic. Case Report: An eight-year-old male underwent a left thoracotomy, repair of esophageal vascular ring, and translocation of the left subclavian to the left carotid artery. Post-operative course was relevant for severe intractable left shoulder and left arm pain associated with allodynia and hyperalgesia. A supraclavicular catheter was inserted, and an infusion of ropivacaine 0.2% was started. The child was sent for physical therapy as he gradually regained all functions of his left arm and resumed his regular activities. Conclusion: Continuous supraclavicular brachial plexus catheter infusion of local anesthetic is a valuable method of reducing pain in severe cases of upper extremity pediatric CRPS and may be safer and more effective than other invasive measures such as sympathetic blocks and epidural catheterization. Further research surrounding the diagnosis and treatment of pediatric CRPS is needed to allow early diagnosis and treatment and to improve outcome.
Ectopic Pregnancy and Tubal Abortion
A E Madu,M Guirguis
Nepal Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology , 2014, DOI: 10.3126/njog.v9i2.11773
Abstract: Abstract DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3126/njog.v9i2.11773 ?
Menstruating from the umbilicus as a rare case of primary umbilical endometriosis: a case report
Pallavi V Bagade, Mamdouh M Guirguis
Journal of Medical Case Reports , 2009, DOI: 10.1186/1752-1947-3-9326
Abstract: A 35-year-old Caucasian woman presented with umbilical bleeding during periods of menstruation. Her umbilicus had a small nodule with bloody discharge. An ultrasound was performed and a diagnosis of possible umbilical endometriosis was thus made. The nodule shrunk in response to gonadotropin-releasing hormone analogues but continued to persist. The patient underwent a wide local excision of the nodule with a corresponding umbilical reconstruction. Histopathology confirmed the diagnosis of umbilical endometriosis. The patient was asymptomatic at follow-up, but nevertheless warned of the risk of recurrence.Pelvic endometriosis is a common condition, but the diagnosis of primary umbilical endometriosis is difficult and differentials should be considered. This case strongly suggests that a differential diagnosis of endometriosis should be considered when an umbilical swelling presents in a woman of reproductive age.Endometriosis, a term first used by Sampson, is the presence of endometrial glands and stroma outside the uterine cavity and musculature [1]. It affects 7% to 10% of women in the reproductive age group [2]. It commonly occurs in the pelvic organs, especially the ovaries, the uterosacral ligaments and the pouch of Douglas. Women with endometriosis often present with dysmenorrhea, menorrhagia, pelvic pain and infertility.Extragenital endometriosis is less common, but has been described in almost every area of the female body including the bowel, bladder, lungs, brain, umbilicus, and surgical scars [3]. Due to its varied presentations, endometriosis remains a difficult condition to diagnose and treat.Umbilical endometriosis represents 0.5% to 1% of all cases of extragenital endometriosis. It usually occurs secondary to surgical scars, but very rarely presents as primary umbilical endometriosis [4,5]. We report one such rare case of spontaneous, primary umbilical endometriosis.A 35-year-old Caucasian parous woman presented to the clinic with symptoms of spontaneo
What elements of the patient–pharmacist relationship are associated with patient satisfaction?
AlGhurair SA, Simpson SH, Guirguis LM
Patient Preference and Adherence , 2012, DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/PPA.S35688
Abstract: t elements of the patient–pharmacist relationship are associated with patient satisfaction? Original Research (2671) Total Article Views Authors: AlGhurair SA, Simpson SH, Guirguis LM Published Date September 2012 Volume 2012:6 Pages 663 - 676 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/PPA.S35688 Received: 06 July 2012 Accepted: 24 August 2012 Published: 24 September 2012 Suliman A AlGhurair, Scot H Simpson, Lisa M Guirguis Department of Pharmacy Practice, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Canada Background: Optimal medication management requires an effective relationship between the patient and health care professional. As pharmacists move from the traditional dispensing role to become more actively involved in patient care, factors influencing their relationship with patients need to be identified. A better understanding of these factors will facilitate more effective relationships. Objective: To explore the effect of patient-perceived pharmacist expertise on relationship quality, self-efficacy, patient satisfaction, and relationship commitment. Methods: This was a cross-sectional study conducted in five community pharmacies within the province of Alberta, Canada. A total of 500 patients were asked to complete a set of validated, self-administered questionnaires that measured perceived pharmacist expertise, relationship quality, self-efficacy, patient satisfaction, and relationship commitment. Hierarchical multiple regression was used to examine the associations between variables. Results: A total of 112 surveys were returned. Internal consistency ranged from 0.86–0.92, suggesting good reliability, except for the relationship commitment scale. There was a significant, positive correlation between patient-perceived pharmacist expertise and quality of the relationship (0.78; P < 0.001). There were also significant, positive correlations between perceived expertise and patient satisfaction (0.52; P < 0.001) and relationship commitment (0.47; P < 0.001). These associations remained significant but the magnitude of correlation decreased when relationship quality was taken into account (0.55; P < 0.001 and 0.56; P < 0.001, respectively). On the other hand, there was no significant association between either patient-perceived pharmacist expertise or relationship quality and medication self-efficacy (0.06; P = 0.517 and 0.10; P = 0.292, respectively). Conclusion: Patient-perceived pharmacist expertise is an independent determinant of relationship quality, patient satisfaction, and relationship commitment. Relationship quality also appears to mediate the effect of perceived expertise on patient satisfaction and relationship commitment.
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