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Search Results: 1 - 10 of 213054 matches for " Jennifer L. Heemeyer "
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Seasonal Pattern of Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis Infection and Mortality in Lithobates areolatus: Affirmation of Vredenburg's “10,000 Zoospore Rule”
Vanessa C. Kinney,Jennifer L. Heemeyer,Allan P. Pessier,Michael J. Lannoo
PLOS ONE , 2012, DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0016708
Abstract: To fully comprehend chytridiomycosis, the amphibian disease caused by the chytrid fungus Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd), it is essential to understand how Bd affects amphibians throughout their remarkable range of life histories. Crawfish Frogs (Lithobates areolatus) are a typical North American pond-breeding species that forms explosive spring breeding aggregations in seasonal and semipermanent wetlands. But unlike most species, when not breeding Crawfish Frogs usually live singly—in nearly total isolation from conspecifics—and obligately in burrows dug by crayfish. Crayfish burrows penetrate the water table, and therefore offer Crawfish Frogs a second, permanent aquatic habitat when not breeding. Over the course of two years we sampled for the presence of Bd in Crawfish Frog adults. Sampling was conducted seasonally, as animals moved from post-winter emergence through breeding migrations, then back into upland burrow habitats. During our study, 53% of Crawfish Frog breeding adults tested positive for Bd in at least one sample; 27% entered breeding wetlands Bd positive; 46% exited wetlands Bd positive. Five emigrating Crawfish Frogs (12%) developed chytridiomycosis and died. In contrast, all 25 adult frogs sampled while occupying upland crayfish burrows during the summer tested Bd negative. One percent of postmetamorphic juveniles sampled were Bd positive. Zoospore equivalents/swab ranged from 0.8 to 24,436; five out of eight frogs with zoospore equivalents near or >10,000 are known to have died. In summary, Bd infection rates in Crawfish Frog populations ratchet up from near zero during the summer to over 25% following overwintering; rates then nearly double again during and just after breeding—when mortality occurs—before the infection wanes during the summer. Bd-negative postmetamorphic juveniles may not be exposed again to this pathogen until they take up residence in crayfish burrows, or until their first breeding, some years later.
Mine Spoil Prairies Expand Critical Habitat for Endangered and Threatened Amphibian and Reptile Species
Michael J. Lannoo,Vanessa C. Kinney,Jennifer L. Heemeyer,Nathan J. Engbrecht,Alisa L. Gallant,Robert W. Klaver
Diversity , 2009, DOI: 10.3390/d1020118
Abstract: Coal extraction has been occurring in the Midwestern United States for over a century. Despite the pre-mining history of the landscape as woodlands, spent surface coalfields are often reclaimed to grasslands. We assessed amphibian and reptile species on a large tract of coal spoil prairie and found 13 species of amphibians (nine frog and four salamander species) and 19 species of reptiles (one lizard, five turtle, and 13 snake species). Two state-endangered and three state species of special concern were documented. The amphibian diversity at our study site was comparable to the diversity found at a large restored prairie situated 175 km north, within the historic prairie peninsula.
The Impact of Cervical Cancer Treatment on Sexual Function and Intimate Relationships: Is Anyone Listening?  [PDF]
Jennifer L. Hunter
Open Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology (OJOG) , 2014, DOI: 10.4236/ojog.2014.48069
Abstract:

The purpose of this research was to describe women’s narrative accounts of the impact of cervical cancer treatment on their sexual function and intimate relationships, and to evaluate what changes in care and education are needed to enhance quality of life and intimacy after treatment. The research approach was a narrative design, using semi-structured, in-depth interviews. Narratives were examined within and across interviews, and thematic content analysis completed. The study was done in a gynecologic oncology clinic at a public hospital in the Midwest United States. The sample consisted of twelve women, ranging in age from 27 to 59, who had completed the cervical cancer treatment with chemo-radiation or radiation and surgery, and were now followed by their gynecologic oncologists. Across narratives, five major themes were identified, including unexpected physical complications, not “getting back to normal,” emotional pain and isolation, lack of available information, and inadequate health care provider response to treatment complications and sexual relationship problems. Women’s stories reveal that sex and intimacy issues for cervical cancer survivors remain within a culture of silence. In many situations, health professionals did not provide information that realistically prepared women and partners for probable consequences of treatment, did not assess sexual issues before or after treatment, did not recognize various symptoms as being complications of cancer treatment, did not make referrals, and/or recognized complications, but accepted them as “normal” and without solution. Ethical implications for health professionals and the need for education, communication, and the development of new lines of research are discussed.

Numerical Solution of Differential Equations by Direct Taylor Expansion  [PDF]
Pirooz Mohazzabi, Jennifer L. Becker
Journal of Applied Mathematics and Physics (JAMP) , 2017, DOI: 10.4236/jamp.2017.53053
Abstract: A variation of the direct Taylor expansion algorithm is suggested and applied to several linear and nonlinear differential equations of interest in physics and engineering, and the results are compared with those obtained from other algorithms. It is shown that the suggested algorithm competes strongly with other existing algorithms, both in accuracy and ease of application, while demanding a shorter computation time.
Jealousy Induction Methods, Sex, and the Big-5 Personality Dimensions  [PDF]
Jennifer L. Weinstein, T. Joel Wade
Psychology (PSYCH) , 2011, DOI: 10.4236/psych.2011.25080
Abstract: One-hundred and twenty five participants were administered an online survey to investigate: which type of cheating, emotional or sexual, is more likely to be used in an attempt to induce jealousy in a partner, which type of cheating is perceived as most effective for inducing jealousy, and whether or not the Big-5 personality dimensions are related to the choice of jealousy induction technique. Emotional cheating was hypothesized to be selected more often, and given a higher effectiveness rating, than physical cheating for inducing jealousy in a partner. Additionally, men were hypothesized to rate physical cheating as worse than emotional cheating while women were expected to rate emotional cheating as more hurtful. The results were partially consistent with the hypotheses. Emotional cheating was selected as the method to induce jealousy most often and was rated as the most effective way to induce jealousy. However, physical cheating was rated as more upsetting by both men and women. Additionally, Big-5 personality dimensions were not related to choice of jealousy induction method or reactions to physical or emotional cheating. The findings are discussed in relation to prior research.
Using the GLOBE Program to Educate Students on the Interdependence of Our Planet and People  [PDF]
Sherry S. Herron, Jennifer L. Robertson
Creative Education (CE) , 2013, DOI: 10.4236/ce.2013.44A005
Abstract:
We present how we have used GLOBE protocols and programs in a college undergraduate English course for science and non-science majors, Writing in the Sciences, and in a graduate-level field course for in-service teachers. Collecting land cover data and determining biomass in conjunction with a series of writing assignments allowed the English students to connect their work to research done in ecosystems throughout the world, and to specific environmental concerns such as carbon sequestration, biodiversity, and the impact of controlled burning on ecosystems. Teachers demonstrated increased knowledge of ecology, natural histories of various organisms, and awareness of environmental resources. A study conducted the following summer revealed that teachers valued the course and felt that their experiences helped them be more effective teachers. Six of the eight teachers had conducted field activities with their students, but also reported significant challenges associated with the effort.
Maximum Entropy and Bayesian Inference for the Monty Hall Problem  [PDF]
Jennifer L. Wang, Tina Tran, Fisseha Abebe
Journal of Applied Mathematics and Physics (JAMP) , 2016, DOI: 10.4236/jamp.2016.47127
Abstract: We devise an approach to Bayesian statistics and their applications in the analysis of the Monty Hall problem. We combine knowledge gained through applications of the Maximum Entropy Principle and Nash equilibrium strategies to provide results concerning the use of Bayesian approaches unique to the Monty Hall problem. We use a model to describe Monty’s decision process and clarify that Bayesian inference results in an “irrelevant, therefore invariant” hypothesis. We discuss the advantages of Bayesian inference over the frequentist inference in tackling the uneven prior probability Monty Hall variant. We demonstrate that the use of Bayesian statistics conforms to the Maximum Entropy Principle in information theory and Bayesian approach successfully resolves dilemmas in the uneven probability Monty Hall variant. Our findings have applications in the decision making, information theory, bioinformatics, quantum game theory and beyond.
Shrinking the Metabolic Solution Space Using Experimental Datasets
Jennifer L. Reed
PLOS Computational Biology , 2012, DOI: 10.1371/journal.pcbi.1002662
Abstract: Constraint-based models of metabolism have been used in a variety of studies on drug discovery, metabolic engineering, evolution, and multi-species interactions. These genome-scale models can be generated for any sequenced organism since their main parameters (i.e., reaction stoichiometry) are highly conserved. Their relatively low parameter requirement makes these models easy to develop; however, these models often result in a solution space with multiple possible flux distributions, making it difficult to determine the precise flux state in the cell. Recent research efforts in this modeling field have investigated how additional experimental data, including gene expression, protein expression, metabolite concentrations, and kinetic parameters, can be used to reduce the solution space. This mini-review provides a summary of the data-driven computational approaches that are available for reducing the solution space and thereby improve predictions of intracellular fluxes by constraint-based models.
Innovations in mental health services implementation: a report on state-level data from the U.S. Evidence-Based Practices Project
Jennifer L Magnabosco
Implementation Science , 2006, DOI: 10.1186/1748-5908-1-13
Abstract: Content analysis and Greenhalgh et al's (2004) definition of innovation were used to identify and classify state-level activities employed during three phases of EBP implementation: Pre-Implementation, Initial Implementation and Sustainability Planning. Activities were coded from site visit reports created from documents and notes from key informant interviews conducted during two periods, Fall 2002 – Spring 2003, and Spring 2004. Frequency counts and rank-order analyses were used to examine patterns of implementation activities and strategies employed across the three phases of implementation.One hundred and six discreet implementation activities and strategies were identified as innovative and were classified into five categories: 1) state infrastructure building and commitment, 2) stakeholder relationship building and communications, 3) financing, 4) continuous quality management, and 5) service delivery practices and training. Implementation activities from different categories were employed at different phases of implementation.Insights into effective strategies for implementing EBPs in mental health and other health sectors require qualitative and quantitative research that seeks to: a) empirically test the effects of tools and methods used to implement EBPs, and b) establish a stronger evidence-base from which to plan, implement and sustain such efforts. This paper offers a classification scheme and list of innovative implementation activities and strategies. The classification scheme offers potential value for future studies that seek to assess the effects of various implementation processes, and helps establish widely accepted standards and criteria that can be used to assess the value of innovative activities and strategies.During the last decade the testing and implementation of evidence-based practices (EBPs) in healthcare systems throughout the United States has increased. While published literature examining implementation of EBPs in health continues t
Are adolescents with high socioeconomic status more likely to engage in alcohol and illicit drug use in early adulthood?
Jennifer L Humensky
Substance Abuse Treatment, Prevention, and Policy , 2010, DOI: 10.1186/1747-597x-5-19
Abstract: The study analyzed data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Adolescent Health (AddHealth), a longitudinal, nationally-representative survey of secondary school students in the United States. Logistic regression models were analyzed examining the relationship between adolescent SES (measured by parental education and income) and substance use in adulthood, controlling for substance use in adolescence and other covariates.Higher parental education is associated with higher rates of binge drinking, marijuana and cocaine use in early adulthood. Higher parental income is associated with higher rates of binge drinking and marijuana use. No statistically significant results are found for crystal methamphetamine or other drug use. Results are not sensitive to the inclusion of college attendance by young adulthood as a sensitivity analysis. However, when stratifying by race, results are consistent for white non-Hispanics, but no statistically significant results are found for non-whites. This may be a reflection of the smaller sample size of non-whites, but may also reflect that these trends are driven primarily by white non-Hispanics.Previous research shows numerous problems associated with substance use in young adults, including problems in school, decreased employment, increases in convictions of driving under the influence (DUI) and accidental deaths. Much of the previous literature is focused on lower SES populations. Therefore, it is possible that teachers, parents and school administrators in wealthier schools may not perceive as great to address substance abuse treatment in their schools. This study can inform teachers, parents, school administrators and program officials of the need for addressing drug abuse prevention activities to this population of students.The relationship between childhood socioeconomic status (SES) and behavioral health in adulthood has long been of interest to researchers and policymakers. A few studies have found that adolescents with
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