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Search Results: 1 - 10 of 224091 matches for " Janelle R. Pollard "
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Controlling a Permanent State of Change – IT Management Framework (ITMF)
Janelle R. Pollard,Shane R. Geisler
Journal of Economics, Business and Management , 2014, DOI: 10.7763/joebm.2014.v2.97
Abstract: In acknowledgement that organisations are in a permanent state of change; that IT needs to deliver change at the pace of business; and the rejection of ‘one size fits all’ delivery model resulting in hybrid methodologies, a blended and encompassing management partnerships across an organisation have become even more pertinent in business. To this goal the IT Management Framework (ITMF) has established a framework that provides the organisation with the ability to identify and capture information across multiple level throughout the organisations structure without impacting delivery. ITMF forms a single delivery orientated ICT Environment which establishes methodology independent framework, without being prescriptive about the execution methodologies; simultaneously empowering leadership teams simplification of the governance touch points and reporting obligations into the delivery environment
Description of a hybrid ice sheet-shelf model, and application to Antarctica
D. Pollard,R. M. DeConto
Geoscientific Model Development (GMD) & Discussions (GMDD) , 2012, DOI: 10.5194/gmd-5-1273-2012
Abstract: The formulation of a 3-D ice sheet-shelf model is described. The model is designed for long-term continental-scale applications, and has been used mostly in paleoclimatic studies. It uses a hybrid combination of the scaled shallow ice and shallow shelf approximations for ice flow. Floating ice shelves and grounding-line migration are included, with parameterized ice fluxes at grounding lines that allows relatively coarse resolutions to be used. All significant components and parameterizations of the model are described in some detail. Basic results for modern Antarctica are compared with observations, and simulations over the last 5 million years are compared with previously published results. The sensitivity of ice volumes during the last deglaciation to basal sliding coefficients is discussed.
Description of a hybrid ice sheet-shelf model, and application to Antarctica
D. Pollard,R. M. DeConto
Geoscientific Model Development Discussions , 2012, DOI: 10.5194/gmdd-5-1077-2012
Abstract: The formulation of a 3-D ice sheet-shelf model is described. The model is designed for long-term continental-scale applications, and has been used mostly in paleoclimatic studies. It uses a hybrid combination of the scaled Shallow Ice and Shallow Shelf Approximations for ice flow. Floating ice shelves and grounding-line migration are included, with parameterized ice fluxes at grounding lines that allows relatively coarse resolutions to be used. All significant components and parameterizations of the model are described in some detail. Basic results for modern Antarctica are compared with observations, and simulations over the last 5 million yr are shown to be similar to previously published results using an earlier model version. The sensitivity of ice retreat during the last deglaciation to basal sliding coefficients is discussed.
A simple inverse method for the distribution of basal sliding coefficients under ice sheets, applied to Antarctica
D. Pollard,R. M. DeConto
The Cryosphere Discussions , 2012, DOI: 10.5194/tcd-6-1405-2012
Abstract: Variations in intrinsic bed conditions that affect basal sliding, such as the distribution of deformable sediment versus hard bedrock, are important boundary conditions for large-scale ice-sheet models, but are hard to observe and remain largely uncertain below the modern Greenland and Antarctic ice sheets. Here a very simple model-based method is described for deducing the modern spatial distribution of basal sliding coefficients. The model is run forward in time, and the basal sliding coefficient at each grid point is periodically increased or decreased depending on whether the local ice surface elevation is too high or too low compared to observed, in areas of unfrozen bed. The method considerably reduces large-scale errors in Antarctic ice elevation, from several 100's to a few 10 m in most regions. Remaining ice elevation errors over mountain ranges such as the Transantarctics are further improved by parameterizing the possible effect of sub-grid topography in the basal sliding law, representing sliding in deep valleys. Results are briefly compared with previous work using relatively sophisticated control methods, and the method is applied to alternate topographies of the Recovery Glacier basin.
A simple inverse method for the distribution of basal sliding coefficients under ice sheets, applied to Antarctica
D. Pollard,R. M. DeConto
The Cryosphere , 2012, DOI: 10.5194/tc-6-953-2012
Abstract: Variations in intrinsic bed conditions that affect basal sliding, such as the distribution of deformable sediment versus hard bedrock, are important boundary conditions for large-scale ice-sheet models, but are hard to observe and remain largely uncertain below the modern Greenland and Antarctic ice sheets. Here a very simple model-based method is described for deducing the modern spatial distribution of basal sliding coefficients. The model is run forward in time, and the basal sliding coefficient at each grid point is periodically increased or decreased depending on whether the local ice surface elevation is too high or too low compared to observed in areas of unfrozen bed. The method considerably reduces large-scale errors in Antarctic ice elevation, from several 100s to several 10s of meters in most regions. Remaining ice elevation errors over mountain ranges such as the Transantarctics are further improved by parameterizing the possible effect of sub-grid topography in the basal sliding law, representing sliding in deep valleys. Results are compared with modern velocity data, and various sensitivity tests are described in Appendices.
Climate Change Effect on Winter Temperature and Precipitation of Yellowknife, Northwest Territories, Canada from 1943 to 2011  [PDF]
Janelle Laing, Jacqueline Binyamin
American Journal of Climate Change (AJCC) , 2013, DOI: 10.4236/ajcc.2013.24027
Abstract:

The correlation of the Southern Oscillation Index (SOI), Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO), Pacific North American Oscillation (PNA), Arctic Oscillation (AO), and Scandinavia (SCAND) indices with winter (DJF) temperature and precipitation for the period of 1943 to 2011 was analyzed to study climate change and variability of Yellowknife, NWT. SOI correlated negatively with both temperature (r = -0.14) and precipitation (r = -0.06) causing colder, drier conditions during La Nina and warmer, wetter conditions during El Nino. PDO was shown to have a strong positive correlation with both temperature (r = 0.60) and precipitation (r = 0.33) causing warmer, wetter weather in the positive phase and colder, drier weather in the negative phase. PNA showed the strongest positive correlation for both temperature (r = 0.69) and precipitation (r = 0.37) causing very warm and wet conditions in the positive phase and very cold and dry conditions during the negative phase. AO correlated negatively with temperature (r = -0.04) and positively with precipitation (r = 0.24) causing colder, wetter conditions in the positive phase and warmer, drier conditions in the negative phase. Finally SCAND was shown to have a weak negative correlation with both temperature (r = -0.10) and precipitation (r = -0.18). Sunspot area showed a strong negative correlation (r = -0.30) with temperature and a very weak positive correlation (r = 0.07) with total annual precipitation. Yellowknife’s average annual temperature and precipitation has increased by 2.5°C and 120 mm, respectively throughout the past 69 years.

The TARC/sICAM5 Ratio in Patient Plasma is a Candidate Biomarker for Drug Resistant Epilepsy
John R. Pollard,Clifton L. Dalgard,Sai K. Ivaturi,Harvey B. Pollard
Frontiers in Neurology , 2013, DOI: 10.3389/fneur.2012.00181
Abstract: Epilepsy is a common affliction that involves inflammatory processes. There are currently no definitive chemical diagnostic biomarkers in the blood, so diagnosis is based on a sometimes expensive synthesis of clinical observation, radiology, neuro-psychological testing, and interictal and ictal EEG studies. Soluble ICAM5 (sICAM5), also known as telencephalin, is an anti-inflammatory protein of strictly central nervous system tissue origin that is also found in blood. Here we have tested the hypothesis that plasma concentrations of select inflammatory cytokines, including sICAM5, might serve as biomarkers for epilepsy diagnosis. To test this hypothesis, we developed a highly sensitive and accurate electrochemiluminescent ELISA assay to measure sICAM5 levels, and measured levels of sICAM5 and 18 other inflammatory mediators in epilepsy patient plasma and controls. Patient samples were drawn from in-patients undergoing video-EEG monitoring, without regard to timing of seizures. Differences were defined by t-test, and Receiver Operating Condition (ROC) curves determined the ability of these tests to distinguish between the two populations. In epilepsy patient plasmas, we found that concentrations of anti-inflammatory sICAM5 are reduced (p = 0.002) and pro-inflammatory IL-1β, IL-2, and IL-8 are elevated. TARC (thymus and activation regulated chemokine, CCL17) concentrations trend high. In contrast, levels of BDNF and a variety of other pro-inflammatory mediators are not altered. Based on p-value and ROC analysis, we find that the ratio of TARC/sICAM5 discriminates accurately between patients and controls, with an ROC Area Under the Curve (AUC) of 1.0 (p = 0.034). In conclusion, we find that the ratio of TARC to sICAM5 accurately distinguishes between the two populations and provides a statistically and mechanistically compelling candidate blood biomarker for drug resistant epilepsy.
Preliminary evidence of discourse improvement with dopaminergic medication  [PDF]
Janelle Sanchez, Kristie A. Spencer
Advances in Parkinson's Disease (APD) , 2013, DOI: 10.4236/apd.2013.22007
Abstract: Dopaminergic therapy can improve motor functioning in Parkinson’s disease (PD), but its effect on spoken discourse is poorly understood. This study addressed whether discourse produced during a one-minute monologue would be affected by medication withdrawal. We performed a detailed analysis of semistructured speech samples in 38 patients with PD, including measures of efficiency, syntactic complexity, cohesion (i.e., lexical and grammatical ties between sentences), and coherence (i.e., semantic relationship between the utterances and the topic, or between utterances). We found that patients produced more efficient and coherent monlogues when on versus off medication. As discourse relies heavily on cognitive processes such as working memory, these findings are consistent with research showing improved working memory and executive processes with dopaminegic medication.
Massive secondary postpartum haemorrhage managed with insertion of a Bakri balloon catheter after surgical evacuation of the uterus
R Agrawal, F Legge, K Pollard, S Al-Inizi
South African Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology , 2011,
Abstract: Massive secondary postpartum haemorrhage (PPH) can be life threatening. A case of massive secondary PPH is presented which was managed by uterotonic agents, evacuation of the uterus and insertion of an intra-uterine balloon catheter to control bleeding and avoid the need for other surgical interventions such as laparotomy and hysterectomy. However, massive secondary PPH following caesarean section invariably requires hysterectomy, as does secondary PPH from severe sepsis.
Evaluation of a present-day climate simulation with a new coupled atmosphere-ocean model GENMOM
J. R. Alder, S. W. Hostetler, D. Pollard,A. Schmittner
Geoscientific Model Development (GMD) & Discussions (GMDD) , 2011, DOI: 10.5194/gmd-4-69-2011
Abstract: We present a new, non-flux corrected AOGCM, GENMOM, that combines the GENESIS version 3 atmospheric GCM (Global Environmental and Ecological Simulation of Interactive Systems) and MOM2 (Modular Ocean Model version 2) nominally at T31 resolution. We evaluate GENMOM by comparison with reanalysis products (e.g., NCEP2) and three models used in the IPCC AR4 assessment. GENMOM produces a global temperature bias of 0.6 °C. Atmospheric features such as the jet stream structure and major semi-permanent sea level pressure centers are well simulated as is the mean planetary-scale wind structure that is needed to produce the correct position of stormtracks. Most ocean surface currents are reproduced except where they are not resolvable at T31 resolution. Overall, GENMOM captures reasonably well the observed gradients and spatial distributions of annual surface temperature and precipitation and the simulations are on par with other AOGCMs. Deficiencies in the GENMOM simulations include a warm bias in the surface temperature over the southern oceans, a split in the ITCZ and weaker-than-observed overturning circulation.
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