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Search Results: 1 - 10 of 102851 matches for " James W. Bloor "
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Arrhythmia Caused by a Drosophila Tropomyosin Mutation Is Revealed Using a Novel Optical Coherence Tomography Instrument
Lisha Ma,Adrian Bradu,Adrian Gh. Podoleanu,James W. Bloor
PLOS ONE , 2012, DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0014348
Abstract: Dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) is a severe cardiac condition that causes high mortality. Many genes have been confirmed to be involved in this disease. An ideal system with which to uncover disease mechanisms would be one that can measure the changes in a wide range of cardiac activities associated with mutations in specific, diversely functional cardiac genes. Such a system needs a genetically manipulable model organism that allows in vivo measurement of cardiac phenotypes and a detecting instrument capable of recording multiple phenotype parameters.
CO2 Acts as a Signalling Molecule in Populations of the Fungal Pathogen Candida albicans
Rebecca A. Hall,Luisa De Sordi,Donna M. MacCallum,Hüsnü Topal,Rebecca Eaton,James W. Bloor,Gary K. Robinson,Lonny R. Levin,Jochen Buck,Yue Wang,Neil A. R. Gow,Clemens Steegborn,Fritz A. Mühlschlegel
PLOS Pathogens , 2010, DOI: 10.1371/journal.ppat.1001193
Abstract: When colonising host-niches or non-animated medical devices, individual cells of the fungal pathogen Candida albicans expand into significant biomasses. Here we show that within such biomasses, fungal metabolically generated CO2 acts as a communication molecule promoting the switch from yeast to filamentous growth essential for C. albicans pathology. We find that CO2-mediated intra-colony signalling involves the adenylyl cyclase protein (Cyr1p), a multi-sensor recently found to coordinate fungal responses to serum and bacterial peptidoglycan. We further identify Lys 1373 as essential for CO2/bicarbonate regulation of Cyr1p. Disruption of the CO2/bicarbonate receptor-site interferes selectively with C. albicans filamentation within fungal biomasses. Comparisons between the Drosophila melanogaster infection model and the mouse model of disseminated candidiasis, suggest that metabolic CO2 sensing may be important for initial colonisation and epithelial invasion. Our results reveal the existence of a gaseous Candida signalling pathway and its molecular mechanism and provide insights into an evolutionary conserved CO2-signalling system.
Qué puede decir el sociólogo del conocimiento de 2+2=4?
David Bloor
Política y Sociedad , 1993, DOI: -
Abstract: Sin resumen
Towards a systemic functional model for comparing forms of discourse in academic writing Towards a systemic functional model for comparing forms of discourse in academic writing
Meriel Bloor
Ilha do Desterro , 2008,
Abstract: This article reports on research into the variation of texts across disciplines and considers the implications of this work for the teaching of writing. The research was motivated by the need to improve students’ academic writing skills in English and the limitations of some current pedagogic advice. The analysis compares Methods sections of research articles across four disciplines, including applied and hard sciences, on a cline, or gradient, termed slow to fast. The analysis considers the characteristics the texts share, but more importantly identifies the variation between sets of linguistic features. Working within a systemic functional framework, the texts are analysed for length, sentence length, lexical density, readability, grammatical metaphor, Thematic choice, as well as various rhetorical functions. Contextually relevant reasons for the differences are considered and the implications of the findings are related to models of text and discourse. Recommendations are made for developing domain models that relate clusters of features to positions on a cline. This article reports on research into the variation of texts across disciplines and considers the implications of this work for the teaching of writing. The research was motivated by the need to improve students’ academic writing skills in English and the limitations of some current pedagogic advice. The analysis compares Methods sections of research articles across four disciplines, including applied and hard sciences, on a cline, or gradient, termed slow to fast. The analysis considers the characteristics the texts share, but more importantly identifies the variation between sets of linguistic features. Working within a systemic functional framework, the texts are analysed for length, sentence length, lexical density, readability, grammatical metaphor, Thematic choice, as well as various rhetorical functions. Contextually relevant reasons for the differences are considered and the implications of the findings are related to models of text and discourse. Recommendations are made for developing domain models that relate clusters of features to positions on a cline.
Unitless Physics I: Relating the Fundamental Constants  [PDF]
James W. Christy
International Journal of Astronomy and Astrophysics (IJAA) , 2015, DOI: 10.4236/ijaa.2015.53023
Abstract: The fundamental constants of Physics can be related via a numerical equivalence. This equivalence leads to a unitless transformation which reduces the number of fundamental constants and provides a simple relationship between E&M, gravitation and quantum mechanics. Unitless relationships in this paper are considered a representation associated with information processing internal to fundamental particles. The application of the unitless transformation (US9) to fundamental particle masses and lifetimes clearly demonstrates the applicability of this method to high energy physics.
Unitless Physics II: Internal Proton Structure US9-2  [PDF]
James W. Christy
Journal of Modern Physics (JMP) , 2017, DOI: 10.4236/jmp.2017.89097
Abstract: The internal structure of the proton is chaotic according to the Standard Model. This paper explores several possibilities, based on US9-1, for producing an internal structure of the proton which is orderly. The hypothesis that quantized distance determination via particle to particle communication is required for force application eliminates E & M in the proton interior enabling a structure consisting of gravitational orbits. Communication velocities much greater than the velocity of light are required to enable the fundamental particles to generate the accepted laws of physics. In order to generate increasing complexity in Nature, the Uncertainty Principle must become the Organizational Principle. The Hydrogen atom is the source of evolution.
Planned Parenthood: Supply Induced Demand for Abortion in the US  [PDF]
James Studnicki, John W. Fisher
Open Journal of Preventive Medicine (OJPM) , 2018, DOI: 10.4236/ojpm.2018.84014
Abstract: The rate and number of induced abortions in the US has declined steadily for nearly three decades. In contrast to this overall reduction, Planned Parenthood Federation of America abortion providers exhibit a persistent increase in both abortions and their market share percentage of total abortion procedures. For the period 1995-2014, estimated annual and cumulative excess abortions are calculated (Planned Parenthood Abortion Inflation Effect—PPAIE) to indicate the number of abortions which would have been averted if the PP utilization experience had been identical to that of Non-PP abortion providers. PP excess abortions grew steadily each year from 21,000 in 1996 to 258,200 in 2014, 28% of total abortions that year. The cumulative number of abortions added by the PPAIE from 1995-2014 was 3,025,560 or 12.5% of the 24,112,600 performed. Planned Parenthood has had a long-term and accelerating inflationary effect on the incidence and prevalence of abortion in the US.
CD44 Expression in Oro-Pharyngeal Carcinoma Tissues and Cell Lines
Abirami Rajarajan, Angela Stokes, Balvinder K. Bloor, Rebecca Ceder, Hemini Desai, Roland C. Grafstr?m, Edward W. Odell
PLOS ONE , 2012, DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0028776
Abstract: Expression of CD44, a transmembrane hyaluronan-binding glycoprotein, is variably considered to have prognostic significance for different cancers, including oral squamous cell carcinoma. Although unclear at present, tissue-specific expression of particular isoforms of CD44 might underlie the different outcomes in currently available studies. We mined public transcriptomics databases for gene expression data on CD44, and analyzed normal, immortalized and tumour-derived human cell lines for splice variants of CD44 at both the transcript and protein levels. Bioinformatics readouts, from a total of more than 15,000 analyses, implied an increased CD44 expression in head and neck cancer, including increased expression levels relative to many normal and tumor tissue types. Also, meta-analysis of over 260 cell lines and over 4,000 tissue specimens of diverse origins indicated lower CD44 expression levels in cell lines compared to tissue. With minor exceptions, reverse transcribed polymerase chain reaction identified expression of the four main isoforms of CD44 in normal oral keratinocytes, transformed lines termed DT and HaCaT, and a series of paired primary and metastasis-derived cell lines from oral or pharyngeal carcinomas termed HN4/HN12, HN22/HN8 and HN30/HN31. Immunocytochemistry, Western blotting and flow cytometric assessments all confirmed the isoform expression pattern at the protein level. Overall, bioinformatic processing of large numbers of global gene expression analyses demonstrated elevated CD44 expression in head and neck cancer relative to other cancer types, and that the application of standard cell culture protocols might decrease CD44 expression. Additionally, the results show that the many variant CD44 exons are not fundamentally deregulated in a diverse range of cultured normal and transformed keratinocyte lines.
Dietary Preference of Gammarus pulex and Asellus aquaticus during a Laboratory Breeding Programme for Ecotoxicological Studies
M. C. Bloor
International Journal of Zoology , 2011, DOI: 10.1155/2011/294394
Abstract: An investigation was undertaken to establish if Gammarus pulex and Asellus aquaticus preferred a diet of unconditioned, artificially or naturally conditioned alder leaves (Alnus glutinosa). Standardised, 24 hour ex situ feeding assays were undertaken with both species to determine their food preference. The results showed that A. aquaticus ate more leaf material compared to G. pulex (Z 23.909, P 0.001) when exposed to all three test variables. Also, both G. pulex and A. aquaticus demonstrated a preference for naturally conditioned leaves compared to the other two variables, with unconditioned leaves proving the least popular food option for both macroinvertebrates (Z 18.803, ). However, both species ate varying amounts of all the leaf treatments (Z 136.399, ). Subsequently, the author outlined a feeding methodology for natural alder leaf conditioning that could be used during a laboratory breeding programme. 1. Introduction What is the best diet for Gammarus pulex and Asellus aquaticus during a laboratory breeding programme and/or ecotoxicological study? Over the years, scientists have used a variety of nutritional supplements to feed macroinvertebrates during breeding programmes and experiments, including dog food [1], baby, and fish food [2]. If the macroinvertebrates were being bred for ecotoxicological studies (or as test subjects within bioassays) they need to be representative of wild specimens, and it is well documented that a test, animals response could be affected by their past history, diet, life stage, disease and so forth [3, 4]. Therefore, by feeding the animals with an unnatural diet, which may not contain the appropriate nutritional requirements, they could display a false negative/positive response during a test. Most workers, however, have gone down the more traditional route of using detritus to feed detritivores [4]. The role of allochthonous organic matter (e.g., leaves, wood) in streams and rivers has been extensively documented [5]. Freshly fallen leaves and other plant detritus that enter the water are rapidly colonized by microorganisms, a process referred to as conditioning [6]. There is considerable experimental evidence that shredders fed on detritus show preferences for and survive better on substrata that has been previously colonized by fungi, for example, Bueler [7]. It has been assumed that microbial colonization improves the nutritional quality of detritus through fungi having a differential ability to eliminate plant allelochemicals [8], fungal synthesis of micronutrients, production of mycotoxins [9], and/or the
Some remarks on the geometry of the Standard Map
Katie Bloor,Stefano Luzzatto
Mathematics , 2008, DOI: 10.1142/S0218127409024025
Abstract: We define and compute hyperbolic coordinates and associated foliations which provide a new way to describe the geometry of the standard map. We also identify a uniformly hyperbolic region and a complementary 'critical' region containing a smooth curve of tangencies between certain canonical 'stable' foliations.
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