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Search Results: 1 - 10 of 20588 matches for " James Propp "
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Discrete analogue computing with rotor-routers
James Propp
Physics , 2010, DOI: 10.1063/1.3489886
Abstract: Rotor-routing is a procedure for routing tokens through a network that can implement certain kinds of computation. These computations are inherently asynchronous (the order in which tokens are routed makes no difference) and distributed (information is spread throughout the system). It is also possible to efficiently check that a computation has been carried out correctly in less time than the computation itself required, provided one has a certificate that can itself be computed by the rotor-router network. Rotor-router networks can be viewed as both discrete analogues of continuous linear systems and deterministic analogues of stochastic processes.
Lambda-determinants and domino-tilings
James Propp
Mathematics , 2004,
Abstract: Consider the $2n$-by-$2n$ matrix $M=(m_{i,j})_{i,j=1}^{2n}$ with $m_{i,j} = 1$ for $i,j$ satisfying $|2i-2n-1|+|2j-2n-1| \leq 2n$ and $m_{i,j} = 0$ for all other $i,j$, consisting of a central diamond of 1's surrounded by 0's. When $n \geq 4$, the $\lambda$-determinant of the matrix $M$ (as introduced by Robbins and Rumsey) is not well-defined. However, if we replace the 0's by $t$'s, we get a matrix whose $\lambda$-determinant is well-defined and is a polynomial in $\lambda$ and $t$. The limit of this polynomial as $t \to 0$ is a polynomial in $\lambda$ whose value at $\lambda=1$ is the number of domino tilings of a $2n$-by-$2n$ square.
The combinatorics of frieze patterns and Markoff numbers
James Propp
Mathematics , 2005,
Abstract: This article, based on joint work with Gabriel Carroll, Andy Itsara, Ian Le, Gregg Musiker, Gregory Price, Dylan Thurston, and Rui Viana, presents a combinatorial model based on perfect matchings that explains the symmetries of the numerical arrays that Conway and Coxeter dubbed frieze patterns. This matchings model is a combinatorial interpretation of Fomin and Zelevinsky's cluster algebras of type A. One can derive from the matchings model an enumerative meaning for the Markoff numbers, and prove that the associated Laurent polynomials have positive coefficients as was conjectured (much more generally) by Fomin and Zelevinsky. Most of this research was conducted under the auspices of REACH (Research Experiences in Algebraic Combinatorics at Harvard).
Three-player impartial games
James Propp
Mathematics , 1999,
Abstract: Past efforts to classify impartial three-player combinatorial games (the theories of Li and Straffin) have made various restrictive assumptions about the rationality of one's opponents and the formation and behavior of coalitions. One may instead adopt an agnostic attitude towards such issues, and seek only to understand in what circumstances one player has a winning strategy against the combined forces of the other two. By limiting ourselves to this more modest theoretical objective, and by regarding two games as being equivalent if they are interchangeable in all disjunctive sums,as far as single-player winnability is concerned, we can obtain an interesting analogue of Grundy values for three-player impartial games.
The many faces of alternating-sign matrices
James Propp
Mathematics , 2002,
Abstract: I give a survey of different combinatorial forms of alternating-sign matrices, starting with the original form introduced by Mills, Robbins and Rumsey as well as corner-sum matrices, height-function matrices, three-colorings, monotone triangles, tetrahedral order ideals, square ice, gasket-and-basket tilings and full packings of loops.
A reciprocity theorem for domino tilings
James Propp
Mathematics , 2001,
Abstract: Let T(m,n) denote the number of ways to tile an m-by-n rectangle with dominos. For any fixed m, the numbers T(m,n) satisfy a linear recurrence relation, and so may be extrapolated to negative values of n; these extrapolated values satisfy the relation T(m,-2-n) = epsilon_{m,n} T(m,n), where epsilon_{m,n} is -1 if m is congruent to 2 (mod 4) and n is odd, and is +1 is otherwise. This is equivalent to a fact demonstrated by Stanley using algebraic methods. Here I give a proof that provides, among other things, a uniform combinatorial interpretation of T(m,n) that applies regardless of the sign of n.
Generalized domino-shuffling
James Propp
Mathematics , 2001,
Abstract: The problem of counting tilings of a plane region using specified tiles can often be recast as the problem of counting (perfect) matchings of some subgraph of an Aztec diamond graph A_n, or more generally calculating the sum of the weights of all the matchings, where the weight of a matching is equal to the product of the (pre-assigned) weights of the constituent edges (assumed to be non-negative). This article presents efficient algorithms that work in this context to solve three problems: finding the sum of the weights of the matchings of a weighted Aztec diamond graph A_n; computing the probability that a randomly-chosen matching of A_n will include a particular edge (where the probability of a matching is proportional to its weight); and generating a matching of A_n at random. The first of these algorithms is equivalent to a special case of Mihai Ciucu's cellular complementation algorithm and can be used to solve many of the same problems. The second of the three algorithms is a generalization of not-yet-published work of Alexandru Ionescu, and can be employed to prove an identity governing a three-variable generating function whose coefficients are all the edge-inclusion probabilities; this formula has been used as the basis for asymptotic formulas for these probabilities, but a proof of the generating function identity has not hitherto been published. The third of the three algorithms is a generalization of the domino-shuffling algorithm described by Elkies, Kuperberg, Larsen and Propp; it enables one to generate random ``diabolo-tilings of fortresses'' and thereby to make intriguing inferences about their asymptotic behavior.
Lattice structure for orientations of graphs
James Propp
Mathematics , 2002,
Abstract: Earlier researchers have studied the set of orientations of a connected finite graph $G$, and have shown that any two such orientations having the same flow-difference around all closed loops can be obtained from one another by a succession of local moves of a simple type. Here I show that the set of orientations of $G$ having the same flow-differences around all closed loops can be given the structure of a distributive lattice. The construction generalizes partial orderings that arise in the study of alternating sign matrices. It also gives rise to lattices for the set of degree-constrained factors of a bipartite planar graph; as special cases, one obtains lattices that arise in the study of plane partitions and domino tilings. Lastly, the theory gives a lattice structure to the set of spanning trees of a planar graph.
Lessons I learned from Richard Stanley
James Propp
Mathematics , 2015,
Abstract: I will share with the reader what I have learned from Richard Stanley and the ways in which he has contributed to research in combinatorics conducted by me and my collaborators.
Real Analysis in Reverse
James Propp
Mathematics , 2012,
Abstract: Many of the theorems of real analysis, against the background of the ordered field axioms, are equivalent to Dedekind completeness, and hence can serve as completeness axioms for the reals. In the course of demonstrating this, the article offers a tour of some less-familiar ordered fields, provides some of the relevant history, and considers pedagogical implications.
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