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Search Results: 1 - 10 of 27 matches for " Jacot "
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The effect of hunger on the acoustic individuality in begging calls of a colonially breeding weaver bird
Hendrik Reers, Alain Jacot
BMC Ecology , 2011, DOI: 10.1186/1472-6785-11-3
Abstract: In a field study, we experimentally manipulated the hunger level of colonially breeding Jackson's golden-backed weaver (Ploceus jacksoni) nestlings close to fledging and investigated its effects on acoustic call parameters. Some acoustic parameters that were related to the time-frequency pattern showed high individuality and were largely unaffected by a nestling's state of hunger. However, the majority of call parameters were significantly affected by hunger. Interestingly, most of these acoustic parameters showed both consistent changes with hunger and high between-individual differences, i.e. potential for individual recognition.The results indicate that individual recognition processes can be based on static, hunger-independent call parameters, but also on dynamic hunger-related parameters that show high individuality. Furthermore, these signal properties suggest that the assessment of signals of need can be improved if the signal value is referenced to a chick's vocal spectrum.Acoustic signalling in birds is a popular system in which to ask questions about the evolution of identity signalling systems and the costs and benefits of reliably communicating a sender's condition. These two different kinds of signals (i.e. identity and condition) require very different trait properties. Signals of identity need to be relatively consistent over time within individuals to reliably indicate the senders identity [for review see [1]]. In contrast, condition signals, indicating short term changes in condition (e.g. hunger in food-dependent young), need to be plastic within an individual to reliably reflect the different conditions of a sender [e.g. [2,3]]. Both types of signals have been studied separately in parent-offspring communication. However, these two signals occur simultaneously in begging calls of young birds and the question arises: how can one acoustic signal manifest the need for simultaneous high and low intra-individual variation? So far, no study has investig
Southern Drakensberg Botany
A. Jacot Guillarmod
Koedoe : African Protected Area Conservation and Science , 1988, DOI: 10.4102/koedoe.v31i1.481
Abstract: In the latter part of this century, the high Drakensberg region has been well served botanically, both by extensive scientific studies and by well illustrated more general popular works which have included much on the flora.
Xenillus Clypeator Robineau-Desvoidyand its Identity
Arthur Paul Jacot
Psyche , 1929, DOI: 10.1155/1929/38267
Abstract:
Thomas Say's Free-Living MitesRediscovered
Arthur Paul Jacot
Psyche , 1938, DOI: 10.1155/1938/92469
Abstract:
Concerning Oudemans' “Kritisch HistorischOverzicht der Acarologie” in Its Bearingon Nomenclature of the Moss-Mites
Arthur Paul Jacot
Psyche , 1932, DOI: 10.1155/1932/85431
Abstract:
New Oribatoid Mites
Arthur Paul Jacot
Psyche , 1928, DOI: 10.1155/1928/51346
Abstract:
Quand on écrit, faut-il tout écrire ? . Diderot et la censure When Writing, should one Write everything? . Diderot and Censorship.
Caroline Jacot-Grapa
Droit et Cultures , 2009,
Abstract: Les rapports de Diderot avec la censure et l’interdit sont ambivalents. Il en reconna t la signification morale, intellectuelle et esthétique ; il la pourfend dans Jacques le fataliste. Dans une longue séquence censurée de contes obscènes et d’apologie de l’obscénité, il témoigne d’un puissant sens comique qui plonge dans la tradition carnavalesque du bas corporel, de Rabelais à Sterne. Elle nourrit la nouvelle image qu’il a donnée de l’activité intellectuelle, proclamant le détr nement de la pensée. Diderot’s attitude regarding the various aspects of censorship and prohibitions is ambivalent. On the one hand, he acknowledges its moral, intellectual and aesthetic significance. But, on the other hand, he argues against it while playing with it in his novel Jacques le fataliste. In a long sequence of “obscene tales” and apology of obscenity cut off from the first edition of his novel, he shows a powerful comical temperament which sends the reader back to the carnivalesque tradition of the bas corporel from Rabelais to Sterne. It nourishes his creation of a new image of intellectual activity he has created which proclaims the dethroning of the thought.
Potential Therapeutic Roles for Inhibition of the PI3K/Akt/mTOR Pathway in the Pathophysiology of Diabetic Retinopathy
Jorge L. Jacot,David Sherris
Journal of Ophthalmology , 2011, DOI: 10.1155/2011/589813
Abstract: Novel therapeutics such as inhibitors of PI3K/Akt/mTOR pathway presents a unique opportunity for the management of diabetic retinopathy (DR). Second generation mTOR inhibitors have the prospect to be efficacious in managing various stages of disease progression in DR. During early stages, the mTOR inhibitors suppress HIF-1α, VEGF, leakage, and breakdown of the blood-retinal barrier. These mTOR inhibitors impart a pronounced inhibitory effect on inflammation, an early component with diverse ramifications influencing the progression of DR. These inhibitors suppress IKK and NF-κB along with downstream inflammatory cytokines, chemokines, and adhesion molecules. In proliferative DR, mTOR inhibitors suppress several growth factors that play pivotal roles in the induction of pathological angiogenesis. Lead mTOR inhibitors in clinical trials for ocular indications present an attractive treatment option for chronic use in DR with favorable safety profile and sustained ocular pharmacokinetics following single dose. Thereby, reducing dosing frequency and risk associated with chronic drug administration.
Potential Therapeutic Roles for Inhibition of the PI3K/Akt/mTOR Pathway in the Pathophysiology of Diabetic Retinopathy
Jorge L. Jacot,David Sherris
Journal of Ophthalmology , 2011, DOI: 10.1155/2011/589813
Abstract: Novel therapeutics such as inhibitors of PI3K/Akt/mTOR pathway presents a unique opportunity for the management of diabetic retinopathy (DR). Second generation mTOR inhibitors have the prospect to be efficacious in managing various stages of disease progression in DR. During early stages, the mTOR inhibitors suppress HIF-1α, VEGF, leakage, and breakdown of the blood-retinal barrier. These mTOR inhibitors impart a pronounced inhibitory effect on inflammation, an early component with diverse ramifications influencing the progression of DR. These inhibitors suppress IKK and NF-κB along with downstream inflammatory cytokines, chemokines, and adhesion molecules. In proliferative DR, mTOR inhibitors suppress several growth factors that play pivotal roles in the induction of pathological angiogenesis. Lead mTOR inhibitors in clinical trials for ocular indications present an attractive treatment option for chronic use in DR with favorable safety profile and sustained ocular pharmacokinetics following single dose. Thereby, reducing dosing frequency and risk associated with chronic drug administration. 1. Introduction Blindness as a consequence of diabetic retinopathy from long-standing or poorly controlled diabetes causes profound adverse psychological effects to the diabetic patient. Diabetic retinopathy has a significant economic impact on society in terms of healthcare resources that are required and the potential of loss in the workforce. The number of people at risk of blindness from diabetic retinopathy in the United States alone continues to rise, and diabetic retinopathy is the leading cause of blindness in the industrialized world covering a wide age range in adults [1]. Diabetic retinopathy affects 75% of all diabetics after 15 years of the disease and up to 97.5% after 15 years of the disease when diagnosis is made prior to 30 years of age [2]. One in five patients will progress to develop proliferative retinopathy after 25 years of known diabetes [2] Predictions for the prevalence of diabetic retinopathy in the USA over the next 39 years for those older than 40 years are 16 million and for those over 65 years are 9.9 million [3]. Moreover, by the year 2050, those afflicted with a sight-threatening stage of proliferative diabetic retinopathy are projected to be 3.4 million for those over 40 years of age and 1.9 million for those 65 years of age or older [3]. Tight control of presumed key risk factors now appears to be insufficient in minimizing the prevalence of sight-threatening proliferative retinopathy [4]. In addition to the established risk
Do Zebra Finch Parents Fail to Recognise Their Own Offspring?
Hendrik Reers,Alain Jacot,Wolfgang Forstmeier
PLOS ONE , 2012, DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0018466
Abstract: Individual recognition systems require the sender to be individually distinctive and the receiver to be able to perceive differences between individuals and react accordingly. Many studies have demonstrated that acoustic signals of almost any species contain individualized information. However, fewer studies have tested experimentally if those signals are used for individual recognition by potential receivers. While laboratory studies using zebra finches have shown that fledglings recognize their parents by their “distance call”, mutual recognition using the same call type has not been demonstrated yet. In a laboratory study with zebra finches, we first quantified between-individual acoustic variation in distance calls of fledglings. In a second step, we tested recognition of fledgling calls by parents using playback experiments. With a discriminant function analysis, we show that individuals are highly distinctive and most measured parameters show very high potential to encode for individuality. The response pattern of zebra finch parents shows that they do react to calls of fledglings, however they do not distinguish between own and unfamiliar offspring, despite individual distinctiveness. This finding is interesting in light of the observation of a high percentage of misdirected feedings in our communal breeding aviaries. Our results demonstrate the importance of adopting a receiver's perspective and suggest that variation in fledgling contact calls might not be used in individual recognition of offspring.
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