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Search Results: 1 - 10 of 257 matches for " JT Atemnkeng "
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Household-level Social Capital in Cameroon and Children’s Schooling: A Gender Analysis
JT Atemnkeng
Africa Development , 2010,
Abstract: This article examines household-level social capital as a determinant of children’s schooling using a cross-sectional data of the 2001 Cameroon Household Survey. Reduced form demand equations of schooling for the entire sample, male and female children are estimated separately. Results indicate that parent’s education and income strongly influence parental decisions towards a child’s schooling. However, social capital, especially in the female dimension, is more important as both male and female children are equally given the opportunity to attend school and there is no gender bias in children’s schooling outcome when parents participate in groups or associations. We recommend the building of social capital by creating associations and encouraging females to be actively involved in such associative groups.
Preliminary study of the utilisation of coconut in yoghurt production
H. Imele, A. Atemnkeng
Journal of Food Technology in Africa , 2001,
Abstract: The possibility of using the coconut in yoghurt production was evaluated. Four types of yoghurt were made from the mixture of cow milk and coconut milk using the different percentage. The preliminary results show that the final product is delicious, has pleasant coconut flavour. The titratable acidity of yoghurt ranged from 75° T (type D) to 95° T (Type A). The consistency/viscosity of the product has gone up with increase of the percentage of coconut in the mixture. The coagulation time of yoghurt is about 5 hours. After the organoleptic appreciation, the preference was given to different types of yoghurt. The Journal of Food Technology in Africa Volume 6 Number 1 (January-March 2001), pp. 11-12
Fiscal Policy, Labour Productivity Growth and Convergence between Agriculture and Manufacturing: Implications for Poverty Reduction in Cameroon
Tabi Atemnkeng Johannes,Aloysius Mom Njong
Asian Social Science , 2012, DOI: 10.5539/ass.v8n4p190
Abstract: This paper examines the factors that drive labour productivity convergence between agriculture and manufacturing activities in Cameroon over 1969-2005. It is supposed that whenever one sector grows in terms of labour productivity it will also bring benefit to other industries. For instance, agriculture plays a significant role in reducing poverty. The bulk of the poor are engaged in agriculture and so an increase in agricultural productivity has a significant potential for reducing such poverty. Our findings indicate that while government spending on education, health, and road infrastructures promotes convergence, agricultural spending reinforces inequality in sectoral labour productivity by disproportionately increasing non-agricultural sector productivity. Furthermore, increases in manufacturing and service productivity levels both have a positive impact on agricultural productivity in the long-run, with manufacturing equally contributing in the short-run.
Linguistic Choices and Gender Roles in New Nigerian Literature: An Examination of Alpha Emeka’s The Carnival and Razinat Mohammed’s A Love Like a Woman’s and Other Stories
JT Dooga
African Research Review , 2009,
Abstract: This paper is premised on the Systemic Functional approach to text analysis, which considers a work of art as a consequence of the social milieu (Senkoro, 2005). Specifically, it takes Hasan’s (1985) view that without linguistics, the study of literature remains a series of personal preferences. It examines how power is invested along gender lines through language choice in two works of fiction, both by new Nigerian writers: Emeka’s novel The Carnival and Mohammed’s short story collection A Love Like a Woman’s and Other Stories. It seeks to achieve two objectives. The first is to evaluate whether, and to what extent new Nigerian writing is holding onto, or shifting from established ideologies regarding the portrayal of women in fiction, especially by male writers. The second is to compare the two works, The Carnival, by a male writer, with A Love Like a Woman’s written by a female, to see whether and to what extent the two differ in their portrayal of characters of the two sexes. The final part of the paper draws conclusions on the basis of the evidence from the two books that would help in validating the notion of gender positioning in Nigerian fiction, or re-assessing same. The paper argues that such an examination of broader contextual properties oftexts affect their description and interpretation, and concludes that by thus determining positions available within texts, we can make a proper evaluation of how gender is grounded in new Nigerian writing.
Unlearning as a Process of Learning: Practical Aspects in Teaching English in a Second Language Setting
JT Dooga
African Research Review , 2010,
Abstract: This paper addresses pedagogic issues relating to the teaching of English in a second language setting. It argues for a descriptive and functional approach to language teaching and learning and insists that traditional approaches, which tend to be mainly prescriptive, are no longer adequate for addressing the communicative needs of today’s language learners. Specifically, it opines that learning English entails “unlearning” the discomfort we are taught about such things as double negatives. It proposes a dynamic, interactive and collaborative approach to English language teaching and learning. Results of actual classroom experiments are presented to illustrate how instructors can determine the actual language needs of students and thus tailor their instructions to address these. The experiments also support the central argument in this essay that predetermined department-based syllabi might need to be regulated to make them functional to the needs of specific students. As the results of the experiments show, a failure to make such functional alignments could produce students who are only notionally educated but functionally empty. Key Words: unlearn, second language, ESP, ESL, pedagogy, chalkface, elearning
Drying characteristics and engineering properties of fermented ground cassava
JT Nwabanne
African Journal of Biotechnology , 2009,
Abstract: The effect of variety on the drying and engineering properties of fermented ground cassava was studied in order to generate data for design and optimum performance of various dryers used in cassava processing. This research attempts to provide data on the engineering properties such as moisture content, specific heat capacity, thermal conductivity, thermal diffusivity and bulk density. One native cultivar and two high yield improved cultivars (TMS 30572 and NR 8082) were used for this study. The specific heat capacity obtained ranged from 1.40 to 1.45 KJ/Kg K and for bone dry fermented ground cassava. The average thermal conductivity obtained was 0.24 W/MK. The bulk density, specific heat capacity, and thermal conductivity increased with increase in moisture content while thermal diffusivity decreased as moisture content increased.
People’s perceptions of HIV/AIDS as portrayed by their labels of the disease: the case of Botswana
JT Mathangwane
SAHARA J (Journal of Social Aspects of HIV/AIDS Research Alliance) , 2011,
Abstract: It is typical of societies to come up with their own labels or names to any phenomenon that may befall them in the course of their life time. Human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (HIV/AIDS) has been no exception to this practice. In Botswana most of these labels are either in Setswana or English whereby an Eglish expression is simply adopted and used to refer to HIV/AIDS. This study looks at the different labels or names that have been used to refer to HIV/AIDS in Botswana. It is an attempt to provide insights into perceptions of HIV/AIDS by the local communities portrayed through the naming of this disease. The study demonstrates how, through the different labels, the local communities started in denial distancing themselves from this disease and in some cases associating AIDS with ailments already known to them, cultural practices and taboos. Some of these labels further demonstrate the negative attitudes that may have fuelled HIV-related stigma in the country. Based on the informants’ responses, the paper further attempts a categorisation of these labels influenced by different attitudes to HIV/AIDS, some of which are self-perpetuating and may continue to be a hindrance to the fight against the disease.
CASE REPORT: Four (4) clients using norplant contraceptive implants beyond 8 years in Jos, Nigeria
JT Mutihir
Nigerian Journal of Clinical Practice , 2007,
Abstract: No s. Nigerian Journal of Clinical Practice Vol.10(2) 2007: pp.174-176
Property rights and traditional knowledge
JT Cross
Potchefstroom Electronic Law Journal/Potchefstroomse Elektroniese Regsblad , 2010,
Abstract: For the past several decades, there has been a push to provide some sort of right akin to an intellectual property right in traditional knowledge and traditional cultural expression. This push has encountered staunch resistance from a number of different quarters. Many of the objections are practical. However, underlying these practical concerns is a core philosophical concern. A system of traditional knowledge rights, this argument suggests, simply does not satisfy the basic rationale for granting property rights in intangibles like inventions and expressive works. Intellectual property is meant to encourage innovation and creative activity. Most traditional knowledge, by contrast, is not innovative, at least in the same sense as the inventions and works that qualify for patents and copyrights. At present, the "anti-property" camp seems to have the better of the argument, as even the World Intellectual Property Organisation has abandoned the notion of true property rights. This article seeks to refute this philosophical objection to a property model for traditional knowledge. It argues that the classic philosophical argument justifying intellectual "property" namely, that property rights are justified only as a way to spur innovation and other creative activity is incorrect in two ways. First, the argument misstates the main goal of an intellectual property system. While intellectual property may serve as an incentive for innovation, society's primary concern is not the innovation per se, but instead the dissemination of knowledge. Second, there may be policy reasons other than the development of knowledge that can justify intellectual property-like rights. The article then applies these observations to the particular question of traditional knowledge and cultural expression. It demonstrates that a system of property rights could be useful in helping to encourage the dissemination of traditional knowledge, even if that knowledge is not "new" in the classic sense. Second, other important social concerns, especially the goal of ensuring accuracy in knowledge, may justify a system of property rights. While these arguments may not ultimately support a property rights system—after all, the practical concerns remain very real—they do help to refute the underlying philosophical objection.
Property Rights And Traditional Knowledge
JT Cross
Potchefstroom Electronic Law Journal/Potchefstroomse Elektroniese Regsblad , 2010,
Abstract: For the past several decades, there has been a push to provide some sort of right akin to an intellectual property right in traditional knowledge and traditional cultural expression. This push has encountered staunch resistance from a number of different quarters. Many of the objections are practical. However, underlying these practical concerns is a core philosophical concern. A system of traditional knowledge rights, this argument suggests, simply does not satisfy the basic rationale for granting property rights in intangibles like inventions and expressive works. Intellectual property is meant to encourage innovation and creative activity. Most traditional knowledge, by contrast, is not innovative, at least in the same sense as the inventions and works that qualify for patents and copyrights. At present, the "anti-property" camp seems to have the better of the argument, as even the World Intellectual Property Organisation has abandoned the notion of true property rights. This article seeks to refute this philosophical objection to a property model for traditional knowledge. It argues that the classic philosophical argument justifying intellectual "property" namely, that property rights are justified only as a way to spur innovation and other creative activity is incorrect in two ways. First, the argument misstates the main goal of an intellectual property system. While intellectual property may serve as an incentive for innovation, society's primary concern is not the innovation per se, but instead the dissemination of knowledge. Second, there may be policy reasons other than the development of knowledge that can justify intellectual property-like rights. The article then applies these observations to the particular question of traditional knowledge and cultural expression. It demonstrates that a system of property rights could be useful in helping to encourage the dissemination of traditional knowledge, even if that knowledge is not "new" in the classic sense. Second, other important social concerns, especially the goal of ensuring accuracy in knowledge, may justify a system of property rights. While these arguments may not ultimately support a property rights system—after all, the practical concerns remain very real—they do help to refute the underlying philosophical objection.
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