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Search Results: 1 - 10 of 10441 matches for " JONATHAN; "
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Under the Flag of Blue and White: Mary as an A-NationalSymbol in the Greek-Orthodox Community in Israel  [PDF]
Jonathan Ventura
Sociology Mind (SM) , 2011, DOI: 10.4236/sm.2011.14029
Abstract: Marian devotion and rituals have been the apex of Christian believers’ journey for centuries. In spite of its importance in many disciplines, Marian devotion and rituals in Israel have been neglected. In this article I will outline several social and religious aspects of Marian devotion in the Greek-Orthodox community in Israel. Using several case-studies of Marian devotion around the world I will address the question is Mary a national symbol in Israel? Since one of the most important Marian devotion sites is located in Israel and centered in Mary’s place of ascension in Gethsemane, addressing this site directly is crucial. I will express a new concept more fitting to the Israeli case—Mary as an a-national symbol. This research is based upon a combination of two main methodologies: participant observations and in-depth interviews with believers (local Greek and Palestinian residents as well as pilgrims) and clergymen. The research focuses on a procession taking place in the Old City of Jerusalem in the end of August, celebrating Mary’s legacy and resurrection.
On the Robustness of Strategic Experimentation to Persuasive Cheap Talk  [PDF]
Jonathan Rosborough
Theoretical Economics Letters (TEL) , 2012, DOI: 10.4236/tel.2012.25097
Abstract: This paper develops a model in which a privately informed seller attempts to indirectly influence the experimentation strategy of a buyer by sending costless signals. The question under consideration is whether there is any credible way in which this single rational seller could influence the buyer’s decisions. We provide bounds on information transmission in equilibrium, and show that there exists no reporting strategy for the seller which changes the experimentation strategy of the buyer. These results demonstrate the robustness of a class of learning models to coercion.
Investor Na?veté and Asset Prices  [PDF]
Jonathan Cook
Journal of Mathematical Finance (JMF) , 2013, DOI: 10.4236/jmf.2013.34047
Abstract:

This paper describes strategic behavior in a nonequilibrium model of asset pricing with heterogeneous sophistication. Both risk and return are increasing in the na?veté of investors in the market. Optimal investment involves in considering the effect that na?e investors have on the market. Further, we derive a simple characterization of the asset price dynamics that results from an arbitrary combination of a countably infinite set of investor types.

Further Properties of Reproducing Graphs  [PDF]
Jonathan Jordan, Richard Southwell
Applied Mathematics (AM) , 2010, DOI: 10.4236/am.2010.15045
Abstract: Many real world networks grow because their elements get replicated. Previously Southwell and Cannings introduced a class of models within which networks change because the vertices within them reproduce. This happens deterministically so each vertex simultaneously produces an offspring every update. These offspring could represent individuals, companies, proteins or websites. The connections given to these offspring depend upon their parent’s connectivity much as a child is likely to interact with their parent’s friends or a new website may copy the links of pre-existing one. In this paper we further investigate one particular model, ‘model 3’, where offspring connect to their parent and parent’s neighbours. This model has some particularly interesting features, including a degree distribution with an interesting fractal-like form, and was introduced independently under the name Iterated Local Transitivity by Bonato et al. In particular we show connections between this degree distribution and the theory of integer partitions and show that this can be used to explain some of the features of the degree distribution; we give exact formulae for the number of complete subgraphs and the global clustering coefficient and we show how to calculate the minimal cycle basis.
Assessing outcomes after fast track surgical management of corpus cancer  [PDF]
Jonathan Carter, Shannon Philp
Open Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology (OJOG) , 2011, DOI: 10.4236/ojog.2011.13026
Abstract: Objective: The aim of the study was to audit the outcomes of patients with corpus cancer managed with a fast track surgery (FTS) program. Design: Clinical audit of outcomes after laparotomy for corpus cancer and managed by FTS principles. Setting: Tertiary hospital, University based subspecialty gynaecological oncology practice. Population or Sample: Consecutive patients with uterine corpus cancer. There were no exclusions. Methods: Three year audit of FTS Database. Main Outcome Measures: Ability to tolerate early oral feeding (EOF), length of stay (LOS), perioperative complication rate and readmission rate. Results: Sixty six patients were operated upon whose median age was 59.5 years. Forty six (70%) had stage I disease, 7 (11%) stage II, 9 (14%) stage III and 4 (6%) had stage IV disease. Twenty seven (41%) had lymph node sampling performed. Median operating time was 2.5 hours. Mean BMI was 30 kg/m2 (Range: 18 - 47). Fifty patients (76%) were classified as over-weight or obese. Twenty four patients (36%) had a “non-zero” performance status. Mean intraoperative EBL was 227 ml. Median LOS was 3.0 days. There were 3 (5%) intraoperative complications. There were no intraoperative ureteric, bowel or vascular injuries. Postoperatively, 13 (20%) patients experienced a total of 24 adverse events. Only 2 (3%) patients experienced complications greater than grade 2. Conclusion: This audit shows that in an unselected group of patients undergoing laparotomy as management for their uterine malignancy and managed by a FTS protocol, overall excellent results can be achieved.
Using Nursery Rhymes to Foster Phonological and Musical Processing Skills in Kindergarteners  [PDF]
Jonathan Bolduc, Pascal Lefebvre
Creative Education (CE) , 2012, DOI: 10.4236/ce.2012.34075
Abstract: The aim of this study was to assess the efficiency of four learning conditions to develop phonological and musical processing skills through a set of 10 nursery rhymes. According to the analysis of the teachers’ practices, eight kindergarten classes (n = 100 kindergarteners) were paired and assigned to one of the following conditions: 1) music, 2) language, 3) combined [music and language], and 4) passive listening (control classes). Participants in conditions 1, 2, and 3 were met for 40 minutes per week over a ten-week period. In condition 1, the nursery rhymes were supplemented by musical activities and in condition 2 by language activities. Condition 3 was a combination of activities from conditions 1 and 2. In condition 4, children listened to a recording of the same nursery rhymes for 15 minutes daily during free exploration periods. No intervention was proposed for this control condition. All participants were evaluated using the same phonological and musical processing measures prior to and after the implementation of the program. Results indicated that children in conditions 1, 2 and 3 significantly improved their phonological awareness and their invented spelling skills at post-test. However, only the two conditions in which the music component was integrated enhanced significantly their results at the verbal memory task. Children in conditions 1, 3 and 4 enhanced tonal and rhythm perception skills. This study demonstrated that supplementing nursery rhymes with language activities is an efficient manner to develop emergent literacy skills, but the addition of musical activities could also boost phonological processing skills.
Emerging technology in acute resuscitation monitoring  [PDF]
Matthew Tichauer, Jonathan McCoy
Open Journal of Nursing (OJN) , 2012, DOI: 10.4236/ojn.2012.223048
Abstract: Fluid optimization in the resuscitation of shock became the mainstay of treatment following the advent of Early Goal-Directed Therapy (EGDT) by Rivers et al. in 2001 [1]. Patients presenting in shock require prompt optimization of volume status and cardiac out- put to ensure adequate perfusion. Poor optimization may be associated with prolonged hospital and intensive care unit stays. The prior gold standard, pulmonary artery catheterization, is rarely available in the emergency department setting and its invasive nature has led to recent re-evaluation of its clinical utility. However, there are new monitoring technologies that are being studied in the intensive care unit setting that may soon be available in emergency departments to aid in nursing and physician decision making to improve acute resuscitation.
Critical Thinking in Health Sciences Education: Considering “Three Waves”  [PDF]
Renate Kahlke, Jonathan White
Creative Education (CE) , 2013, DOI: 10.4236/ce.2013.412A1004
Abstract:

Historically, health science education has focused on content knowledge. However, there has been increasing recognition that education must focus more on the thinking processes required of future health professionals. In an effort to teach these processes, educators of health science students have looked to the concept of critical thinking. But what does it mean to “think critically”? Despite some attempts to clarify and define critical thinking in health science education and in other fields, it remains a “complex and controversial notion that is difficult to define and, consequently, difficult to study” (Abrami et al., 2008, p. 1103). This selected review offers a roadmap of the various understandings of critical thinking currently in circulation. We will survey three prevalent traditions from which critical thinking theory emerges and the major features of the discourses associated with them: critical thinking as a set of technical skills, as a humanistic mode of accessing creativity and exploring self, and as a mode of ideology critique with a goal of emancipation. The goal of this literature review is to explore the various ways in which critical thinking is understood in the literature, how and from where those understandings emerge, and the debates that shape each understanding.

The Summation of One Class of Infinite Series  [PDF]
Jonathan D. Weiss
Applied Mathematics (AM) , 2014, DOI: 10.4236/am.2014.517269
Abstract: This paper presents closed-form expressions for the series, \"\", where the sum is from n = 1 to n = ∞. These expressions were obtained by recasting the series in a different form, followed by the use of certain relationships involving the elliptical nome. Among the values of x for which these expressions can be obtained are of the form: \"\" and \"\", where l is an integer between ∞ and ∞. The values of λ include 1,\"\",\"\"and 3. Examples of closed-form expressions obtained in this manner are first presented for \"\", \"\", \"\", and \"\". Additional examples are then presented for \"\", \"\", \"\", and \"\". This undertaking was prompted by the author’s work on an electrostatics boundary-value problem related to the van der Pauw measurement technique of electrical resistivity. The presence of this series for x = \"\" in the solution of that problem and its absence from any compendium of infinite series that he consulted led to this work.
A Rare Case of Nasal Glial Heterotopia Presenting as Sphenochoanal Polyp  [PDF]
Pavol Surda, Jonathan Hobson
International Journal of Otolaryngology and Head & Neck Surgery (IJOHNS) , 2015, DOI: 10.4236/ijohns.2015.42014
Abstract: Objective: This paper reports a rare case of nasal glial heterotopia presenting as sphenochoanal polyp. So far, literature has revealed only few cases. Case Report: A 55-year-old woman presented with a 2-month history of left sided nasal obstruction. Rigid endoscopy showed greyish left nasal polyp and anterior discharge. Subsequently, CT scan of the sinuses revealed sphenochoanal polyp filling the left nasal cavity, without signs of expansion, or destruction and no obvious connection with intracranial tissue. Mass was removed endoscopically and histology confirmed glial nature of the mass. Conclusion: Any mass arising from sphenoid sinus should be carefully evaluated on CT scan for existence of fibrous stalk, or connection with brain tissue and needs to be considered in the differential diagnosis of the sphenochoanal mass. Complete surgical excision is the treatment of choice, which is curative.
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