oalib

Publish in OALib Journal

ISSN: 2333-9721

APC: Only $99

Submit

Any time

2019 ( 330 )

2018 ( 529 )

2017 ( 508 )

2016 ( 767 )

Custom range...

Search Results: 1 - 10 of 402431 matches for " J. B. Elliott "
All listed articles are free for downloading (OA Articles)
Page 1 /402431
Display every page Item
Marathon pacing and elevation change
J. B. Elliott
Physics , 2012,
Abstract: An analysis of marathon pacing and elevation change is presented. It is based on an empirical observation of how the pace of elite and non-elite marathon runners change over the course of the marathon and a simple approximation of the energy cost of ascent and decent. It was observed that the pace of the runners slowed in a regular manner that could be broken up into four regions. That observation can be used to project target paces for a desired marathon finish time. However, that estimate fails to take in to account the energetic costs of elevation changes (hills) along the marathon course. Several approximations are made to give a coarse estimate of target paces for marathon run on courses with significant elevation changes, i.e. a hilly course. The 2012 Oakland Marathon course is used as and example of a hilly course and the times of 23 finishers are examined.
Statistical signatures of critical behavior in small systems
J. B. Elliott,the EOS Collaboration
Physics , 2000, DOI: 10.1103/PhysRevC.62.064603
Abstract: The cluster distributions of different systems are examined to search for signatures of a continuous phase transition. In a system known to possess such a phase transition, both sensitive and insensitive signatures are present; while in systems known not to possess such a phase transition, only insensitive signatures are present. It is shown that nuclear multifragmentation results in cluster distributions belonging to the former category, suggesting that the fragments are the result of a continuous phase transition.
Flaws, Fallacies and Facts: Reviewing the Early History of the Lipid and Diet/Heart Hypotheses  [PDF]
J. Elliott
Food and Nutrition Sciences (FNS) , 2014, DOI: 10.4236/fns.2014.519201
Abstract: The lipid hypothesis of coronary heart disease proposes that a high total cholesterol level has a causative role in coronary heart disease (CHD), specifically in the development of atherosclerosis. It forms the basis for formulating target levels of serum cholesterol and hence the widespread use of statins for lowering cholesterol. An extension of the lipid hypothesis is the diet/heart hypothesis of coronary heart disease. This theory combines two ideas—that saturated fat raises cholesterol levels, and that a reduced saturated fat intake will lower cholesterol levels, thereby inhibiting the development of atherosclerosis and manifestations of CHD. Those who make diet recommendations or prescribe medication to reduce cholesterol may be unaware of the underpinning science. The original research behind these recommendations has given us “healthy heart” guidelines and preventive measures we assume to be true. While the lipid and diet/heart hypotheses are often presented as fact, they remain inadequately proven theories that have little agreement from experts. Historical perspectives can help us understand the basis of current-day beliefs. In the lipid hypothesis case, research from the 1950s and 60s was instrumental in its formation. This early work should not be considered irrelevant, outdated or obsolete because current recommendations from national heart associations in many countries continue to be shaped by these studies. This paper examines evidence used to formulate the lipid hypothesis and, subsequently, the diet/ heart hypothesis. By critically evaluating steps in the formation of the theory, inconsistencies, mistakes and alternate explanations become apparent and cast doubt on its validity.
An investigation of standard thermodynamic quantities as determined via models of nuclear multifragmentation
J. B. Elliott,A. S. Hirsch
Physics , 1999, DOI: 10.1103/PhysRevC.61.054605
Abstract: Both simple and sophisticated models are frequently used in an attempt to understand how real nuclei breakup when subjected to large excitation energies, a process known as nuclear multifragmentation. Many of these models assume equilibriumthermodynamics and produce results often interpreted as evidence of a phase transition. This work examines one class of models and employs standard thermodynamical procedure to explore the possible existence and nature of a phase transition. The role of various terms, e.g. Coulomb and surface energy, is discussed.
Engineering Many-Body Dynamics with Quantum Light Potentials and Measurements
Thomas J. Elliott,Igor B. Mekhov
Physics , 2015,
Abstract: Interactions between many-body atomic systems and light in cavities induce new atomic dynamics, which we show can be tailored by projective light measurement backaction, leading to collective effects such as density-density interactions, perfectly-correlated atomic tunneling, superexchange, and effective pair creation and annihilation. These can be long- and short-range, with tunable strengths, based on the optical setup. We show this provides a framework to enhance quantum simulations of novel physical phenomena, including reservoir models and dynamical gauge fields, beyond current methods.
Exactly Soluble Models for Surface Partition
K. A. Bugaev,J. B. Elliott
Physics , 2005,
Abstract: The surface partition of large clusters is studied analytically within a frame-work of the ``Hills and Dales Model''. Three formulations are solved exactly by using the Laplace-Fourier transformation method. In the limit of small amplitude deformations, the ``Hills and Dales Model'' gives upper and lower bounds for the surface entropy coefficient of large clusters. A comparison with the 2- and 3-dimensional Ising model surface entropy coefficients is made.
Current issues and perspectives in prenatal nutrition
Morrison JC, Elliott J, Knuppel RA, Sibai B, Pill MW
Research and Reports in Neonatology , 2011, DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/RRN.S19797
Abstract: rrent issues and perspectives in prenatal nutrition Expert Opinion (3787) Total Article Views Authors: Morrison JC, Elliott J, Knuppel RA, Sibai B, Pill MW Published Date May 2011 Volume 2011:1 Pages 25 - 38 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/RRN.S19797 John C Morrison1, John Elliott2, Robert A Knuppel3, Baha Sibai4, Michael W Pill5 1Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Mississippi Medical Center, Jackson, MS, USA; 2Saddleback Memorial Medical Center, Women's Hospital, Laguna Hills, CA, USA; 3DuBois Regional Medical Center, DuBois, PA, USA; 4University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, Cincinnati, OH, USA; 5Gemini Healthcare, Westbrook, CT, USA Abstract: The typical American diet, characterized by energy-dense foods rich in starches, sugars, and saturated fats, and low in fruits and vegetables, is relatively unhealthy and is associated with nutritional deficiencies. Suboptimal diets for pregnant women have been associated with serious maternal medical complications (eg, iron deficiency anemia, high blood pressure, gestational diabetes, and morning sickness), as well as an increased risk of intrauterine growth restriction, birth defects, developmental delays after birth, and future chronic health problems, (eg, heart disease, type 2 diabetes, high blood pressure, and high cholesterol) during childhood, as well as later in life. Folic acid deficiency is one of the most common problems among pregnant women, and supplementation with folic acid during pregnancy has been reported to decrease the occurrence and recurrence of fetal neural tube defects. Folate supplementation beginning preconception, along with a multivitamin, at least 12 weeks prior to conception is recommended to achieve maximal risk reduction. The reported benefits of supplementing docosahexaenoic acid, an unsaturated omega-3 essential fatty acid, during pregnancy include promoting proper neurodevelopment in fetuses and infants that extends into childhood. Pregnancy is also associated with an increased susceptibility to oxidative stress, resulting from the imbalance between oxygen free radicals and the essential antioxidants that maintain homeostasis. Associated complications include preeclampsia, preterm labor, and intrauterine growth restriction. There is not enough evidence to support routine use of antioxidants, such as vitamins C and E during pregnancy, but coenzyme Q10 and lycopene are additional antioxidants under study and are yielding promising results by decreasing the occurrence of maternal complications.
Current issues and perspectives in prenatal nutrition
Morrison JC,Elliott J,Knuppel RA,Sibai B
Research and Reports in Neonatology , 2011,
Abstract: John C Morrison1, John Elliott2, Robert A Knuppel3, Baha Sibai4, Michael W Pill51Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Mississippi Medical Center, Jackson, MS, USA; 2Saddleback Memorial Medical Center, Women's Hospital, Laguna Hills, CA, USA; 3DuBois Regional Medical Center, DuBois, PA, USA; 4University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, Cincinnati, OH, USA; 5Gemini Healthcare, Westbrook, CT, USAAbstract: The typical American diet, characterized by energy-dense foods rich in starches, sugars, and saturated fats, and low in fruits and vegetables, is relatively unhealthy and is associated with nutritional deficiencies. Suboptimal diets for pregnant women have been associated with serious maternal medical complications (eg, iron deficiency anemia, high blood pressure, gestational diabetes, and morning sickness), as well as an increased risk of intrauterine growth restriction, birth defects, developmental delays after birth, and future chronic health problems, (eg, heart disease, type 2 diabetes, high blood pressure, and high cholesterol) during childhood, as well as later in life. Folic acid deficiency is one of the most common problems among pregnant women, and supplementation with folic acid during pregnancy has been reported to decrease the occurrence and recurrence of fetal neural tube defects. Folate supplementation beginning preconception, along with a multivitamin, at least 12 weeks prior to conception is recommended to achieve maximal risk reduction. The reported benefits of supplementing docosahexaenoic acid, an unsaturated omega-3 essential fatty acid, during pregnancy include promoting proper neurodevelopment in fetuses and infants that extends into childhood. Pregnancy is also associated with an increased susceptibility to oxidative stress, resulting from the imbalance between oxygen free radicals and the essential antioxidants that maintain homeostasis. Associated complications include preeclampsia, preterm labor, and intrauterine growth restriction. There is not enough evidence to support routine use of antioxidants, such as vitamins C and E during pregnancy, but coenzyme Q10 and lycopene are additional antioxidants under study and are yielding promising results by decreasing the occurrence of maternal complications.Keywords: prenatal nutrition, oxidative stress, coenzyme Q10, lycopene
Covariance Applications with Kiwi
Mattoon C.M.,Brown D.,Elliott J.B.
EPJ Web of Conferences , 2012, DOI: 10.1051/epjconf/20122700002
Abstract: The Computational Nuclear Physics group at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is developing a new tool, named ‘Kiwi’, that is intended as an interface between the covariance data increasingly available in major nuclear reaction libraries (including ENDF and ENDL) and large-scale Uncertainty Quantification (UQ) studies. Kiwi is designed to integrate smoothly into large UQ studies, using the covariance matrix to generate multiple variations of nuclear data. The code has been tested using critical assemblies as a test case, and is being integrated into LLNL's quality assurance and benchmarking for nuclear data.
Levels of State and Trait Anxiety in Patients Referred to Ophthalmology by Primary Care Clinicians: A Cross Sectional Study
Christopher J. Davey, Clare Harley, David B. Elliott
PLOS ONE , 2013, DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0065708
Abstract: Purpose There is a high level of over-referral from primary eye care leading to significant numbers of people without ocular pathology (false positives) being referred to secondary eye care. The present study used a psychometric instrument to determine whether there is a psychological burden on patients due to referral to secondary eye care, and used Rasch analysis to convert the data from an ordinal to an interval scale. Design Cross sectional study. Participants and Controls 322 participants and 80 control participants. Methods State (i.e. current) and trait (i.e. propensity to) anxiety were measured in a group of patients referred to a hospital eye department in the UK and in a control group who have had a sight test but were not referred. Response category analysis plus infit and outfit Rasch statistics and person separation indices were used to determine the usefulness of individual items and the response categories. Principal components analysis was used to determine dimensionality. Main Outcome Measure Levels of state and trait anxiety measured using the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory. Results State anxiety scores were significantly higher in the patients referred to secondary eye care than the controls (p<0.04), but similar for trait anxiety (p>0.1). Rasch analysis highlighted that the questionnaire results needed to be split into “anxiety-absent” and “anxiety-present” items for both state and trait anxiety, but both subscales showed the same profile of results between patients and controls. Conclusions State anxiety was shown to be higher in patients referred to secondary eye care than the controls, and at similar levels to people with moderate to high perceived susceptibility to breast cancer. This suggests that referral from primary to secondary eye care can result in a significant psychological burden on some patients.
Page 1 /402431
Display every page Item


Home
Copyright © 2008-2017 Open Access Library. All rights reserved.