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Search Results: 1 - 10 of 7333 matches for " Ishag Adam "
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Abdominal Wall Mycetoma Presented as Obstructed Incisional Hernia of Cesarean Section in Eastern Sudan
Osama A. Elhardello,Elsadig S. Adam,Ishag Adam
Infectious Diseases in Obstetrics and Gynecology , 2007, DOI: 10.1155/2007/74643
Abstract: Mycetoma a worldwide disease frequently occurs in the tropics with the highest prevalence being in Africa. Madurella mycetomatis is the main causative organism of human eumycetoma in Sudan. The legs and feet were commonly the sites of the infection. A 22-year-old lady was presented with painful abdominal swelling around a previous caesarian section scar. A provisional diagnosis of obstructed incisional hernia was put. Histopathological examination revealed macroscopically four masses of soft tissue. Microscopic sections showed grains of Madurella mycetomatis.
Comparison of HemoCue? hemoglobin-meter and automated hematology analyzer in measurement of hemoglobin levels in pregnant women at Khartoum hospital, Sudan
Ishag Adam, Samah Ahmed, Mahmoud H Mahmoud, Mohammed I Yassin
Diagnostic Pathology , 2012, DOI: 10.1186/1746-1596-7-30
Abstract: This was a hospital-based cross sectional study carried- out among pregnant women at Khartoum hospital in Sudan to find out whether the measurement of hemoglobin concentration by HemoCue? using venous or capillary samples was comparable to that of the automated hematology analyzer as standard. Bland and Altman method was used to compare the measurements with an acceptable difference of ± 1.0 g/dl.Among the 108 subjects in this study the mean (SD) level of hemoglobin level using HemoCue? venous sample, HemoCue? capillary sample and automated hematology analyzer were 12.70 (1.77), 12.87 (2.04) and 11.53 (1.63) g/dl, respectively. Although the correlations between the measurements were all significant there was no agreement between HemoCue? and automated hematology analyzer. The bias + SD (limits of agreement) for HemoCue? venous versus hematology analyzer was 1.17 ± 1.57 (-1.97, 4.31) g/dl, HemoCue? capillary versus hematology analyzer was 1.34 ± 1.85 (-2.36, 5.04) g/dl, and HemoCue? venous versus HemoCue? capillary samples was 017 ± 1.90 and (3.97-3.63) g/dl.Hemoglobin concentration assessment by HemoCue? using either venous or capillary blood samples has shown unacceptable agreement with automated hematology analyzer.The virtual slide(s) for this article can be found here: http://www.diagnosticpathology.diagnomx.eu/vs/8797022296725036 webciteAnemia is one of the most important causes of morbidity and mortality in developing countries, especially among pregnant women [1]. The world prevalence of anemia in pregnant women and non-pregnant women is 41.8% and 30.2% respectively [2]. Pregnant Sudanese women are susceptible to anemia regardless to their age and parity and anemia is one of the leading causes of maternal and perinatal morbidity and mortality [3-5].Assessment of hemoglobin is one of the most reliable indicators for anemia, and is widely used to screen for anemic individuals, and to evaluate responses to interventions [6]. Hemoglobin concentration is routinely
Prevalence and risk factors for Plasmodium falciparum malaria in pregnant women of eastern Sudan
Ishag Adam, Amar H Khamis, Mustafa I Elbashir
Malaria Journal , 2005, DOI: 10.1186/1475-2875-4-18
Abstract: The prevalence and possible risk factors for Plasmodium falciparum malaria were investigated in 744 pregnant Sudanese women attending the antenatal clinic of New Haifa Teaching Hospital, eastern Sudan, during October 2003-April 2004.A total 102 (13.7%) had P. falciparum malaria, 18(17.6%) of these were severe cases (jaundice and severe anaemia). Univariate and multivariate analysis showed that, age and parity were not associated with malaria. Women who attended the antenatal clinic in the third trimester were at highest risk for malaria (OR = 1.58, 95% CI = 1.02–2.4; P < 0.05).Women with malaria had significantly lower mean haemoglobin (9.4 g/dl, 95% CI 9.1–9.7 versus 10.7, CI 10.6–10.8, P < 0.05). A significantly lower haemoglobin was observed in those with severe falciparum malaria compared to non-severe form (8.3 g/dl, 95% CI 7.6–9.1 versus 9.4, 95% CI 9.1–9.7, P = < 0.05).The results suggest that P. falciparum malaria is common in pregnant women attending antenatal care and that anaemia is an important complication. Preventive measures (chemoprophylaxis and insecticide-treated bednets) may be beneficial in this area for all women irrespective of age or parity.Pregnant women are more susceptible to malaria, which causes serious adverse effects including abortion, low birth weight and maternal anaemia. It is the leading cause maternal mortality in Sudan [1-7].The presentation of malaria during pregnancy varies according to the pre-existing immunity of the mother. Women living in areas of low transmission have little immunity to malaria which can cause severe syndromes, such as cerebral malaria and pulmonary oedema. In contrast, those who live in areas of stable malaria transmission enjoy greater immunity and experience fewer symptoms during episodes of malaria, although they commonly develop severe anaemia as consequence of the infection [1,2,5,8,9].Understanding the epidemiology of malaria during pregnancy provides important insight into relevant immunological pr
Epidemiology of deep venous thrombosis during pregnancy and puerperium in Sudanese women
Asha A Gader, Abed Elrahium D Haggaz, Ishag Adam
Vascular Health and Risk Management , 2009, DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/VHRM.S4196
Abstract: emiology of deep venous thrombosis during pregnancy and puerperium in Sudanese women Original Research (5168) Total Article Views Authors: Asha A Gader, Abed Elrahium D Haggaz, Ishag Adam Published Date December 2008 Volume 2009:5 Pages 85 - 87 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/VHRM.S4196 Asha A Gader1, Abed Elrahium D Haggaz2, Ishag Adam1 1Faculty of Medicine, University of Khartoum, Sudan; 2Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Faculty of Medicine University of Elfasher, Sudan Background: Deep venous thrombosis (DVT) and venous hromboembolism (VTE) is a major health problem with high mortality worldwide. Patients at risk must be identified and given appropriate prophylaxis in order to decrease the mortality. Objective: To investigate the prevalence of DVT in pregnancy and the puerperium and to identify risk factors for DVT. Setting: Khartoum and Khartoum North Teaching hospitals, Sudan. Design: Case-control study. Results: During the study period (April 2007–March 2008), 65 patients presented with DVT as confirmed by Doppler ultrasound. A total of 14,490 deliveries occurred during the study period. The rate was 448 DVT per 100,000 births/year. Only four of these 65 patients were pregnant and the rest presented at postpartum. DVT occurred in the left lower extremity in 51 (78.4%), in the right in 13 (20.0%), and in one (1.5%) woman in both legs. In univarite and multivariate analyses, family history of DVT, primigravidae and cesarean section deliveries showed an higher risk of DVT. Conclusions: The study showed a high prevalence of DVT, most of these events occurred in the postpartum period. Primiparae, family history of DVT and cesarean section deliveries were important risk factors and these groups are candidate for prophylaxis measures against DVT.
A population pharmacokinetic model of piperaquine in pregnant and non-pregnant women with uncomplicated Plasmodium falciparum malaria in Sudan
Hoglund Richard M,Adam Ishag,Hanpithakpong Warunee,Ashton Michael
Malaria Journal , 2012, DOI: 10.1186/1475-2875-11-398
Abstract: Background Pregnancy is associated with an increased risk of developing a malaria infection and a higher risk of developing severe malaria. The pharmacokinetic properties of many anti-malarials are also altered during pregnancy, often resulting in a decreased drug exposure. Piperaquine is a promising anti-malarial partner drug used in a fixed-dose combination with dihydroartemisinin. The aim of this study was to investigate the population pharmacokinetics of piperaquine in pregnant and non-pregnant Sudanese women with uncomplicated Plasmodium falciparum malaria. Method Symptomatic patients received a standard dose regimen of the fixed dose oral piperaquine-dihydroartemisinin combination treatment. Densely sampled plasma aliquots were collected and analysed using a previously described LC-MS/MS method. Data from 12 pregnant and 12 non-pregnant women were analysed using nonlinear mixed-effects modelling. A Monte Carlo Mapped Power (MCMP) analysis was conducted based on a previously published study to evaluate the power of detecting covariates in this relatively small study. Results A three-compartment disposition model with a transit-absorption model described the observed data well. Body weight was added as an allometric function on all clearance and volume parameters. A statistically significant decrease in estimated terminal piperaquine half-life in pregnant compared with non-pregnant women was found, but there were no differences in post-hoc estimates of total piperaquine exposure. The MCMP analysis indicated a minimum of 13 pregnant and 13 non-pregnant women were required to identify pregnancy as a covariate on relevant pharmacokinetic parameters (80% power and p=0.05). Pregnancy was, therefore, evaluated as a categorical and continuous covariate (i.e. estimate gestational age) in a full covariate approach. Using this approach pregnancy was not associated with any major change in piperaquine elimination clearance. However, a trend of increasing elimination clearance with increasing gestational age could be seen. Conclusions The population pharmacokinetic properties of piperaquine were well described by a three-compartment disposition model in pregnant and non-pregnant women with uncomplicated malaria. The modelling approach showed no major difference in piperaquine exposure between the two groups and data presented here do not warrant a dose adjustment in pregnancy in this vulnerable population.
Epidemiology of deep venous thrombosis during pregnancy and puerperium in Sudanese women
Asha A Gader,Abed Elrahium D Haggaz,Ishag Adam
Vascular Health and Risk Management , 2008,
Abstract: Asha A Gader1, Abed Elrahium D Haggaz2, Ishag Adam11Faculty of Medicine, University of Khartoum, Sudan; 2Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Faculty of Medicine University of Elfasher, SudanBackground: Deep venous thrombosis (DVT) and venous hromboembolism (VTE) is a major health problem with high mortality worldwide. Patients at risk must be identified and given appropriate prophylaxis in order to decrease the mortality.Objective: To investigate the prevalence of DVT in pregnancy and the puerperium and to identify risk factors for DVT. Setting: Khartoum and Khartoum North Teaching hospitals, Sudan.Design: Case-control study.Results: During the study period (April 2007–March 2008), 65 patients presented with DVT as confirmed by Doppler ultrasound. A total of 14,490 deliveries occurred during the study period. The rate was 448 DVT per 100,000 births/year. Only four of these 65 patients were pregnant and the rest presented at postpartum. DVT occurred in the left lower extremity in 51 (78.4%), in the right in 13 (20.0%), and in one (1.5%) woman in both legs. In univarite and multivariate analyses, family history of DVT, primigravidae and cesarean section deliveries showed an higher risk of DVT.Conclusions: The study showed a high prevalence of DVT, most of these events occurred in the postpartum period. Primiparae, family history of DVT and cesarean section deliveries were important risk factors and these groups are candidate for prophylaxis measures against DVT.Keywords: DVT, pregnancy, puerperium, risk, Sudan
Maternal near-miss in a rural hospital in Sudan
AbdelAziem A Ali, Awadia Khojali, Amira Okud, Gamal K Adam, Ishag Adam
BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth , 2011, DOI: 10.1186/1471-2393-11-48
Abstract: Near-miss cases and events (hemorrhage, infection, hypertensive disorders, anemia and dystocia), maternal deaths and their causes were retrospectively reviewed and the mortality index for each event was calculated in Kassala Hospital, eastern Sudan over a 2-year period, from January 2008 to December 2010. Disease-specific criteria were applied for these events.There were 9578 deliveries, 205 near-miss cases, 228 near-miss events and 40 maternal deaths. Maternal near-miss and maternal mortality ratio were 22.1/1000 live births and 432/100 000 live births, respectively. Hemorrhage accounted for the most common event (40.8%), followed by infection (21.5%), hypertensive disorders (18.0%), anemia (11.8%) and dystocia (7.9%). The mortality index were 22.2%, 10.0%, 10.0%, 8.8% and 2.4% for infection, dystocia, anemia, hemorrhage and hypertensive disorders, respectively.There is a high frequency of maternal morbidity and mortality at the level of this facility. Therefore maternal health policy needs to be concerned not only with averting the loss of life, but also with preventing or ameliorating maternal-near miss events (hemorrhage, infections, hypertension and anemia) at all care levels including primary level.Maternal near-miss cases of women who nearly died but survived a complication during pregnancy, childbirth or postpartum (maternal near miss or severe acute maternal morbidity) are increasingly recognized as useful means to examine quality of obstetric care since pregnancy complications occur in 15% of women worldwide. The practical implementation of maternal near miss concept should provide an important contribution to improving quality of obstetric care to reduce maternal deaths and improve maternal health [1-4]. More than half a million women die annually as a result of pregnancy. Therefore, it is important to investigate the causes of maternal deaths and maternal morbidities to reduce the maternal mortality ratio and thus meet the Fifth Millennium Development Go
A fixed-dose 24-hour regimen of artesunate plus sulfamethoxypyrazine-pyrimethamine for the treatment of uncomplicated Plasmodium falciparum malaria in eastern Sudan
Ishag Adam, Mamoun Magzoub, Maha E Osman, Insaf F Khalil, Michael Alifrangis, Khalid A Elmardi
Annals of Clinical Microbiology and Antimicrobials , 2006, DOI: 10.1186/1476-0711-5-18
Abstract: the efficacy of fixed co-formulated (f) artesunate-sulfamethoxypyrazine-pyrimethamine (AS+SMP f) administered at time intervals of 12 hours for a 24-hour therapy was compared with the efficacy of the same drug given as a loose combination (AS+SMP l) with a dose interval of 24 hours for 3 days for the treatment of uncomplicated Plasmodium falciparum malaria in eastern Sudan.seventy-three patients (39 and 34 in the fixed and the loose regimen of AS+SMP respectively) completed the 28-days of follow-up. On day 3; all patients in both groups were a parasitaemic but one patient in the fixed group of AS+SMP f was still febrile.Polymerase chain reaction genotyping adjusted cure rates on day 28 were 92.3% and 97.1% (P > 0.05) for the fixed and loose combination of AS+SMP respectively.Three (4.1%) patients (one in the fixed and two patients in the loose group of AS+SMP) in the study suffered drug-related adverse effects.Gametocytaemia was not detected during follow-up in any of the patients.both regimens of AS+SMP were effective and safe for the treatment of uncomplicated P. falciparum malaria in eastern Sudan. Due to its simplicity, the fixed dose one-day treatment regimen may improve compliance and therefore may be the preferred choice.There are almost 515 million episodes of clinical Plasmodium falciparum malaria infections [1]. Malaria treatment and control have been undermined by emergence and spread of drug-resistant malaria worldwide hereby increasing morbidity and mortality. World Health Organization's strategies to reduce malaria-related mortality depend on early diagnosis and effective treatment with an appropriate drug and now artemisinin-based combination therapies (ACTs) are recommended [2,3]. Malaria causes up to 7.5 – 10 million cases and 35000 deaths every year in Sudan [4]. Due to the spread of multi-drug resistant Plasmodium falciparum malaria in Sudan [5], artesunate plus sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine (AS+SP) is at this moment the recommended first-line treatme
Epidemiology of urinary tract infections and antibiotics sensitivity among pregnant women at Khartoum North Hospital
Hamdan Z Hamdan, Abdel Haliem M Ziad, Salah K Ali, Ishag Adam
Annals of Clinical Microbiology and Antimicrobials , 2011, DOI: 10.1186/1476-0711-10-2
Abstract: A cross sectional study has been conducted at Khartoum north teaching hospital Antenatal Care Clinic between February-June 2010, to investigate epidemiology of UTI and antibiotics resistance among pregnant women. Structured questionnaires were used to gather data from pregnant women. UTI was diagnosed using mid stream urine culture on standard culture mediaOut of 235 pregnant women included, 66 (28.0%) were symptomatic and 169 (71.9%) asymptomatic. the prevalence of bacteriuria among symptomatic and asymptomatic pregnant women were (12.1%), and (14.7%) respectively, with no significant difference between the two groups (P = 0.596), and the overall prevalence of UTI was (14.0%). In multivariate analyses, age, gestational age, parity, and history of UTI in index pregnancy were not associated with bacteriuria. Escherichia coli (42.4%) and S. aureus (39.3%) were the commonest isolated bacteria. Four, 2, 2, 3, 4, 2 and 0 out of 14 E. coli isolates, showed resistance to amoxicillin, naladixic acid, nitrofurantoin, ciprofloxacin, co-trimoxazole, amoxicillin/clavulanate and norfloxacin, respectivelyEscherichia coli were the most prevalent causative organisms and showing multi drug resistance pattern, asymptomatic bacteriuria is more prevalent than symptomatic among pregnant women. Urine culture for screening and diagnosis purpose for all pregnant is recommended.Due to several anatomical and hormonal changes, pregnant women are more susceptible to develop Urinary tract infections (UTI) [1]. UTI is a major health problem, it has been reported among 20% of the pregnant women and it is the most common cause of admission in obstetrical wards [2]. Symptomatic and asymptomatic bacteriuria have been reported among 17.9% and 13.0% pregnant women, respectively [3].UTI (perhaps if untreated) can lead to serious obstetric complications, poor maternal and perinatal outcomes e.g. intrauterine growth restriction, pre-eclampsia, caesarean delivery and preterm deliveries [4]. Furthermore, i
Use of antenatal care services in Kassala, eastern Sudan
Abdel Aziem A Ali, Mohammed M Osman, Ameer O Abbaker, Ishag Adam
BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth , 2010, DOI: 10.1186/1471-2393-10-67
Abstract: A cross-sectional community-based study was carried out in Kassala, eastern Sudan during September-October 2009. Household surveys were conducted. Structured questionnaires were used to gather data from women who had been pregnant within the last year, or pregnant more than 14 weeks.Out of 900 women investigated for antenatal care coverage, 811(90%) women had at least one visit. Only 11% of the investigated women had ≥ four antenatal visits, while 10.0% had not attended at all. Out of 811 women who attended at least one visit, 483 (59.6%), 303 (37.4%) and 25 (3.1%) women attended antenatal care in the first, second and third trimester, respectively. In logistic regression analyses, while maternal age and residence were not associated with inadequacy of antenatal care (<2 visits), high parity (OR = 2.0, CI = 1.1-3.5; P = 0.01) and husband education ≤ secondary level (OR = 2.4, CI = 1.3-4.2; P = 0.002) were associated with inadequacy of antenatal care.Antenatal care showed a low coverage in Kassala, eastern Sudan. This low coverage was associated with high parity and low husband education.Antenatal care is one of the four pillars initiatives of the Safe Motherhood Initiative; however, its relative contribution to maternal health has been under debate. While many of routine antenatal care procedures have little effect on maternal mortality and morbidity, some of these have been ascertained as beneficial [1,2]. Antenatal care provides advice, reassurance, education, support for the woman on screening programs and detects the problems that make the pregnancy high risk one [3]. There are many socio-economic and cultural factors which act as barriers to the use of antenatal care [4]. Although, it can't be claimed that antenatal care is the only solution for the high maternal and perinatal death in the developing world, but it can help to reach the Millennium Development Goals for the maternal and child mortality [5].Although, World Health Organization recommended four ante
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