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Search Results: 1 - 10 of 229473 matches for " Ian R. Henderson "
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SRA-Domain Proteins Required for DRM2-Mediated De Novo DNA Methylation
Lianna M. Johnson,Julie A. Law,Anuj Khattar,Ian R. Henderson,Steven E. Jacobsen
PLOS Genetics , 2008, DOI: 10.1371/journal.pgen.1000280
Abstract: De novo DNA methylation and the maintenance of DNA methylation in asymmetrical sequence contexts is catalyzed by homologous proteins in plants (DRM2) and animals (DNMT3a/b). In plants, targeting of DRM2 depends on small interfering RNAs (siRNAs), although the molecular details are still unclear. Here, we show that two SRA-domain proteins (SUVH9 and SUVH2) are also essential for DRM2-mediated de novo and maintenance DNA methylation in Arabidopsis thaliana. At some loci, SUVH9 and SUVH2 act redundantly, while at other loci only SUVH2 is required, and this locus specificity correlates with the differing DNA-binding affinity of the SRA domains within SUVH9 and SUVH2. Specifically, SUVH9 preferentially binds methylated asymmetric sites, while SUVH2 preferentially binds methylated CG sites. The suvh9 and suvh2 mutations do not eliminate siRNAs, suggesting a role for SUVH9 and SUVH2 late in the RNA-directed DNA methylation pathway. With these new results, it is clear that SRA-domain proteins are involved in each of the three pathways leading to DNA methylation in Arabidopsis.
Dynamic Regulation of ARGONAUTE4 within Multiple Nuclear Bodies in Arabidopsis thaliana
Carey F Li,Ian R Henderson,Liang Song,Nina Fedoroff,Thierry Lagrange,Steven E Jacobsen
PLOS Genetics , 2008, DOI: 10.1371/journal.pgen.0040027
Abstract: DNA methylation directed by 24-nucleotide small RNAs involves the small RNA-binding protein ARGONAUTE4 (AGO4), and it was previously shown that AGO4 localizes to nucleolus-adjacent Cajal bodies, sites of snRNP complex maturation. Here we demonstrate that AGO4 also localizes to a second class of nuclear bodies, called AB-bodies, which are found immediately adjacent to condensed 45S ribosomal DNA (rDNA) sequences. AB-bodies also contain other proteins involved in RNA-directed DNA methylation including NRPD1b (a subunit of the RNA Polymerase IV complex, RNA PolIV), NRPD2 (a second subunit of this complex), and the DNA methyltransferase DRM2. These two classes of AGO4 bodies are structurally independent—disruption of one class does not affect the other—suggesting a dynamic regulation of AGO4 within two distinct nuclear compartments in Arabidopsis. Abolishing Cajal body formation in a coilin mutant reduced overall AGO4 protein levels, and coilin dicer-like3 double mutants showed a small decrease in DNA methylation beyond that seen in dicer-like3 single mutants, suggesting that Cajal bodies are required for a fully functioning DNA methylation system in Arabidopsis.
B1b Cells Recognize Protective Antigens after Natural Infection and Vaccination
Adam F. Cunningham,Saeeda Bobat,Charlotte N. L. Cook,Constantino Lopez-Macias,Ian R. Henderson
Frontiers in Immunology , 2014, DOI: 10.3389/fimmu.2014.00535
Abstract: There are multiple, distinct B-cell populations in human beings and other animals such as mice. In the latter species, there is a well-characterized subset of B-cells known as B1 cells, which are enriched in peripheral sites such as the peritoneal cavity but are rare in the blood. B1 cells can be further subdivided into B1a and B1b subsets. There may be additional B1 subsets, though it is unclear if these are distinct populations or stages in the developmental process to become mature B1a and B1b cells. A limitation in understanding B1 subsets is the relative paucity of specific surface markers. In contrast to mice, the existence of B1 cells in human beings is controversial and more studies are needed to investigate the nature of these enigmatic cells. Examples of B1b antigens include pneumococcal polysaccharide and the Vi antigen from Salmonella Typhi, both used routinely as vaccines in human beings and experimental antigens such as haptenated-Ficoll. In addition to inducing classical T-dependent responses some proteins are B1b antigens and can induce T-independent (TI) immunity, examples include factor H binding protein from Borrelia hermsii and porins from Salmonella. Therefore, B1b antigens can be proteinaceous or non-proteinaceous, induce TI responses, memory, and immunity, they exist in a diverse range of pathogenic bacteria, and a single species can contain multiple B1b antigens. An unexpected benefit to studying B1b cells is that they appear to have a propensity to recognize protective antigens in bacteria. This suggests that studying B1b cells may be rewarding for vaccine design as immunoprophylactic and immunotherapeutic interventions become more important due to the decreasing efficacy of small molecule antimicrobials.
RNAi, DRD1, and Histone Methylation Actively Target Developmentally Important Non-CG DNA Methylation in Arabidopsis
Simon W.-L Chan,Ian R Henderson,Xiaoyu Zhang,Govind Shah,Jason S.-C Chien,Steven E Jacobsen
PLOS Genetics , 2006, DOI: 10.1371/journal.pgen.0020083
Abstract: Cytosine DNA methylation protects eukaryotic genomes by silencing transposons and harmful DNAs, but also regulates gene expression during normal development. Loss of CG methylation in the Arabidopsis thaliana met1 and ddm1 mutants causes varied and stochastic developmental defects that are often inherited independently of the original met1 or ddm1 mutation. Loss of non-CG methylation in plants with combined mutations in the DRM and CMT3 genes also causes a suite of developmental defects. We show here that the pleiotropic developmental defects of drm1 drm2 cmt3 triple mutant plants are fully recessive, and unlike phenotypes caused by met1 and ddm1, are not inherited independently of the drm and cmt3 mutations. Developmental phenotypes are also reversed when drm1 drm2 cmt3 plants are transformed with DRM2 or CMT3, implying that non-CG DNA methylation is efficiently re-established by sequence-specific signals. We provide evidence that these signals include RNA silencing though the 24-nucleotide short interfering RNA (siRNA) pathway as well as histone H3K9 methylation, both of which converge on the putative chromatin-remodeling protein DRD1. These signals act in at least three partially intersecting pathways that control the locus-specific patterning of non-CG methylation by the DRM2 and CMT3 methyltransferases. Our results suggest that non-CG DNA methylation that is inherited via a network of persistent targeting signals has been co-opted to regulate developmentally important genes.
The Bacterial Intimins and Invasins: A Large and Novel Family of Secreted Proteins
Jennifer C. Tsai,Ming-Ren Yen,Rostislav Castillo,Denisse L. Leyton,Ian R. Henderson,Milton H. Saier Jr
PLOS ONE , 2012, DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0014403
Abstract: Gram-negative bacteria have developed a limited repertoire of solutions for secreting proteins from the cytoplasmic compartment to the exterior of the cell. Amongst the spectrum of secreted proteins are the intimins and invasins (the Int/Inv family; TC# 1.B.54) which are characterized by an N-terminal β-barrel domain and a C-terminal surface localized passenger domain. Despite the important role played by members of this family in diseases mediated by several species of the Enterobacteriaceae, there has been little appreciation for the distribution and diversity of these proteins amongst Gram-negative bacteria. Furthermore, there is little understanding of the molecular events governing secretion of these proteins to the extracellular milieu.
The De Novo Cytosine Methyltransferase DRM2 Requires Intact UBA Domains and a Catalytically Mutated Paralog DRM3 during RNA–Directed DNA Methylation in Arabidopsis thaliana
Ian R. Henderson,Angelique Deleris,William Wong,Xuehua Zhong,Hang Gyeong Chin,Gregory A. Horwitz,Krystyna A. Kelly,Sriharsa Pradhan,Steven E. Jacobsen
PLOS Genetics , 2010, DOI: 10.1371/journal.pgen.1001182
Abstract: Eukaryotic DNA cytosine methylation can be used to transcriptionally silence repetitive sequences, including transposons and retroviruses. This silencing is stable between cell generations as cytosine methylation is maintained epigenetically through DNA replication. The Arabidopsis thaliana Dnmt3 cytosine methyltransferase ortholog DOMAINS REARRANGED METHYLTRANSFERASE2 (DRM2) is required for establishment of small interfering RNA (siRNA) directed DNA methylation. In mammals PIWI proteins and piRNA act in a convergently evolved RNA–directed DNA methylation system that is required to repress transposon expression in the germ line. De novo methylation may also be independent of RNA interference and small RNAs, as in Neurospora crassa. Here we identify a clade of catalytically mutated DRM2 paralogs in flowering plant genomes, which in A.thaliana we term DOMAINS REARRANGED METHYLTRANSFERASE3 (DRM3). Despite being catalytically mutated, DRM3 is required for normal maintenance of non-CG DNA methylation, establishment of RNA–directed DNA methylation triggered by repeat sequences and accumulation of repeat-associated small RNAs. Although the mammalian catalytically inactive Dnmt3L paralogs act in an analogous manner, phylogenetic analysis indicates that the DRM and Dnmt3 protein families diverged independently in plants and animals. We also show by site-directed mutagenesis that both the DRM2 N-terminal UBA domains and C-terminal methyltransferase domain are required for normal RNA–directed DNA methylation, supporting an essential targeting function for the UBA domains. These results suggest that plant and mammalian RNA–directed DNA methylation systems consist of a combination of ancestral and convergent features.
Characterizing biobank organizations in the U.S.: results from a national survey
Gail E Henderson, R Jean Cadigan, Teresa P Edwards, Ian Conlon, Anders G Nelson, James P Evans, Arlene M Davis, Catherine Zimmer, Bryan J Weiner
Genome Medicine , 2013, DOI: 10.1186/gm407
Abstract:
Impaired gluconeogenesis in a porcine model of paracetamol induced acute liver failure
Konstantinos J Dabos, Henry R Whalen, Philip N Newsome, John A Parkinson, Neil C Henderson, Ian H Sadler, Peter C Hayes, John N Plevris
World Journal of Gastroenterology , 2011,
Abstract: AIM: To investigate glucose homeostasis and in particular gluconeogenesis in a large animal model of acute liver failure (ALF).METHODS: Six pigs with paracetamol induced ALF under general anaesthesia were studied over 25 h. Plasma samples were withdrawn every five hours from a central vein. Three animals were used as controls and were maintained under anaesthesia only. Using 1H NMR spectroscopy we identified most gluconeogenic amino acids along with lactate and pyruvate in the animal plasma samples.RESULTS: No significant changes were observed in the concentrations of the amino acids studied in the animals maintained under anaesthesia only. If we look at the ALF animals, we observed a statistically significant rise of lactate (P < 0.003) and pyruvate (P < 0.018) at the end of the experiments. We also observed statistically significant rises in the concentrations of alanine (P < 0.002), glycine (P < 0.005), threonine (P < 0.048), tyrosine (P < 0.000), phenylalanine (P < 0.000) and isoleucine (P < 0.01). Valine levels decreased significantly (P < 0.05).CONCLUSION: Our pig model of ALF is characterized by an altered gluconeogenetic capacity, an impaired tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle and a glycolytic state.
Contrasted Patterns of Crossover and Non-crossover at Arabidopsis thaliana Meiotic Recombination Hotspots
Jan Drouaud equal contributor,Hossein Khademian equal contributor,Laurène Giraut,Vanessa Zanni,Sarah Bellalou,Ian R. Henderson,Matthieu Falque,Christine Mézard
PLOS Genetics , 2013, DOI: 10.1371/journal.pgen.1003922
Abstract: The vast majority of meiotic recombination events (crossovers (COs) and non-crossovers (NCOs)) cluster in narrow hotspots surrounded by large regions devoid of recombinational activity. Here, using a new molecular approach in plants, called “pollen-typing”, we detected and characterized hundreds of CO and NCO molecules in two different hotspot regions in Arabidopsis thaliana. This analysis revealed that COs are concentrated in regions of a few kilobases where their rates reach up to 50 times the genome average. The hotspots themselves tend to cluster in regions less than 8 kilobases in size with overlapping CO distribution. Non-crossover (NCO) events also occurred in the two hotspots but at very different levels (local CO/NCO ratios of 1/1 and 30/1) and their track lengths were quite small (a few hundred base pairs). We also showed that the ZMM protein MSH4 plays a role in CO formation and somewhat unexpectedly we also found that it is involved in the generation of NCOs but with a different level of effect. Finally, factors acting in cis and in trans appear to shape the rate and distribution of COs at meiotic recombination hotspots.
The BRCA1 Breast Cancer Suppressor: Regulation of Transport, Dynamics, and Function at Multiple Subcellular Locations
Beric R. Henderson
Scientifica , 2012, DOI: 10.6064/2012/796808
Abstract:
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