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Search Results: 1 - 10 of 512811 matches for " I.A. Adeyinka "
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Relationship of Liveweight and Linear Body Measurement in Two Breeds of Goat of Northern Nigeria
I.A Adeyinka,I.D. Mohammed
Journal of Animal and Veterinary Advances , 2012,
Abstract: The study was conducted to determine the relation ship between body weights and linear body measurement so as to enable us develop an accurate prediction equation from linear measurements.. The data used for this study is made up of 163 records sets of records on body weights and linear body measurements (body length, height-at-withers and heart girth) obtained from the University of Maiduguri Teaching and Research Farm. The average body weights were 10.0 0.73 and 7.7 0.42 kg for male and female Red Sokoto goats, respectively. The equivalent values for the White Borno goats were 11.70 0.73 and 8.79 0.32. Within each breed, sex has significant effect on the live body weights and all other body linear body measurement taken. Higher correlation coefficients with body weights were obtained for the females compared to the males the r2 being 0.73 and 0.93 for male and female chest girth, 0.71 and 0.87 for male and female height at wither and for body length male and female, 0.72 and 0.88, respectively.
Multi-nutrient Blocks I: Formulation and Production under a Semi-arid Environment of North East Nigeria
I.D. Mohammed,M. Baulube,I.A. Adeyinka
Journal of Biological Sciences , 2007,
Abstract: A study on the formulation and production of multi-nutrient blocks for feeding ruminants using local feed ingredients was conducted at the University of Maiduguri Teaching and Research Farm in October, 2004. Two formulations (Fl and F2) were developed where Fl had molasses while F2 had no molasses. Other feed ingredients used included salt 5 %; Urea 5%; cement 15%; poultry litter 25%; cotton seed cake 15% while wheat offal was 25 and 35%, respectively. Molasses was 10% in F1 and zero percent in F2. Composition of feed ingredients for dry matter ranges from 94.50 to 95.20% in wheat offal; crude protein ranged from 2.90% in molasses to 17.00% in cotton seed cake. Ether extract values ranged from 4.00% in wheat offal to 6.00% in cotton seed cake. Crude fibre ranged from 13.00% in wheat offal to 20.00% in poultry litter. Nitrogen free extract ranged from 23.00% in molasses to 64.20% in wheat offal. Ash values ranged from 3.00% in wheat offal to 6.00% in poultry litter. Calcium values ranged from 0.14% in wheat offal to 2.50% in poultry litter. Sodium was 39.34% in salt; chlorine was 60.00% in salt; nitrogen was 46.00% in urea; iron was 21.45 ppm in cement; manganese was 179 ppm in cement; magnesium 13000 ppm in cement, respectively. Formulation Fl had higher values and this might be due to the presence of molasses which improved the nutrient value, compactness and hardness. The cost effectiveness of the two formulations showed N 43:00 and N 21:00 for a 1.30 kg block this amount could be able afforded by farmers to purchase the blocks and supplement their animals to improve livestock production in the semi-arid region of Nigeria.
Genetic Parameter Estimates of Body Weights of Naked Neck Broiler Chickens
I.A. Adeyinka,O.O. Oni,B.I. Nwagu,F.D. Adeyinka
International Journal of Poultry Science , 2006,
Abstract: The chicks used in this experiment were obtained from a population of naked neck broiler chickens that has been kept in NAPRI since 1998. Six Hundred chicks were obtained from four hatches, one week apart. At hatch, pedigreed chicks were wing-banded and housed on deep litter in an open house. Body weights were measured biweekly up to 8 weeks of age. Other measurements taken include Neck length, Back length, keel length and breast angle. The general least square means were 37.22 ± 0.32, 210.46 ± 1.97, 744.33 ± 4.31, 1351.3 ± 7.91 and 2428.1 ± 14.61g for wt at day old (WT0D), weight at 2 weeks (WT14D), weight at 4 weeks (WT28D), weight at 6 weeks (WT42D) and weight at 8 weeks (WT56D), respectively. While measurements taken included Neck length, Back length, keel length and breast which were 7.31 ± 0.06, 15.99 ± 0.05, 5.63 ± 0.04, 10.44 ± 0.04cm respectively. The heritability estimates ranged from low value of 3.013 ± 0.08 for keel length to 0.315 ± 0.22 for WT0D. There were negative genetic correlations between WT0D and other traits. This study showed that additive heritabilities are low for linear body measurement and moderate for body weight for naked neck chickens during rearing.
Components of Variance for Some Economic Traits among Rhode Island Chicken Bred in the Northern Guinea Savanna Zone of Nigeria
I.A. Adeyinka,O.O. Oni,B.I. Nwagu,F.D. Adeyinka
International Journal of Poultry Science , 2006,
Abstract: The data used to calculate the variance components of various production traits was obtained from records of about 4000 hens daughters of about 180 cocks mated to about 1,500 dams and collected over 5 year period. Two strains of Rhode Island Chickens were involved in this study. Within the red strain population sire`s contribution to total variation in age at first egg did not exceed 8.6% across the year and 6.9% in the white strain. Except for body weight at 40 weeks of the red strain where the contribution of the sire exceed 14%, the contribution of the sire to the total variation for all the economic traits considered in this study were generally low for both strain of the layer type chickens under consideration. Generally dam component of variance were higher most of the time and in many traits within the red strain population.
Genetic Parameter Estimates for Pre-Weaning Litter Traits in Rabbits
M. Orunmuyi,I.A. Adeyinka,O.A. Ojo,F.D. Adeyinka
Pakistan Journal of Biological Sciences , 2006,
Abstract: One hundred and eleven litter records obtained from the mating of 8 bucks to 22 does of a non-descript population were used to provide estimates of heritability and genetic correlations for pre-weaning litter traits. Least square means and standard errors for fur score, litter size at birth, litter size at weaning and weaning weight were: 30.3±0.17, 3.72±0.12, 4.8±0.12, 3.6±0.14 and 480.70±22.43 g, respectively. The least square analysis of variance revealed that most of the productive traits studied exerted significant effect on weaning weight with the exception of litter size at birth and gestation length. Heritability estimates obtained for gestation length, fur score, litter size at birth, litter size at weaning and weaning weight were 0.60±0.39, 1.46±0.56, 1.09±0.51, 1.49±0.59 and 1.07±0.51, respectively. Genetic correlations were high and positive in most cases with the exception of correlations between gestation length and weaning weight and litter size at weaning and weaning weight which were negative. Phenotypic correlations were also high and positive in most cases except for gestation length and fur score and gestation length and weaning weight which were negative.
Effect of Progesterone Secretion on Egg Production in the Grey Helmet Guinea Fowl (Numida meleagris galleata)
F.D. Adeyinka,L.O. Eduvie,I.A. Adeyinka,G.E. Jokthan
Pakistan Journal of Biological Sciences , 2007,
Abstract: The effect of progesterone (P4) on egg production was investigated using twenty female guinea fowls raised on deep litter. The birds were given feed and water ad-libitum. They were routinely bled by wing jab between the hours of 9.00 and 10.00 am twice a month for P4 determination. Sera harvested from the samples were stored at -20°C until assayed for P4 by Radio-Immuno-Assay method (RIA). Egg production had a very high (p<0.001) and positive correlation with progesterone level. A high value of coefficient of determination (R2 value) was observed, which implies that there is a high accuracy of prediction of egg production from progesterone level.
Growth and Subsequent Egg Production Performance of Shika-Brown Pullets Fed Graded Levels of Cooked Lablab purpureus Beans
I.A. Adeyinka,O.O. Oni,A. Abeke,I.I. Dafwang
Pakistan Journal of Biological Sciences , 2007,
Abstract: : The lablab seeds were cooked for 30 min, sundried for three days and thereafter milled and incorporated into chickens’ diets. Six treatments, comprising of six dietary levels of lablab at 0.0, 7.5, 15.0, 22.5, 30.0 and 37.5%, respectively was fed during the grower’ s phase. Results obtained for the growers phase indicate that final weight (g/bird), weight gain (g/bird) and feed cost (N kg- 1) decreased significantly (p<0.05) as the level of lablab increased in the diet. Feed intake (g/bird and g/bird/day) as well as feed cost (N/bird) and total cost (N/bird) also decreased significantly (p<0.05) as the level of lablab increased in the diet up to 22.5% inclusion level before increasing as the level of lablab in the diets continued to increase. The level of lablab in the diet had no effect on mortality throughout the experimental period. In addition haematological parameters such as Packed Cell Volume (PCV), Haemoglobin (Hb) and Total Protein (TP) were not significantly (p<0.05) affected by feeding diets containing graded levels of cooked lablab beans to pullets. Results obtained during the laying phase indicates that feeding lablab seed meal up to 22.5% in the diets at the growers stage had no significant adverse effect (p<0.05) on final weight, feed intake, feed efficiency, percent henday and henhoused egg production, percent production at peak, kilogramme feed per twelve eggs, feed cost per twelve eggs, Haugh Unit and yolk index. However, age of birds at first egg, age at 50% production and age at peak egg production were increased significantly (p>0.05) with increase in the level of lablab seed meal in the growers diets.
The Performance of Borno White Goat in Agropastoral Management of Semi-Arid North East Nigeria
I.D. Mohammed,B.A. Abdullahi,I.A. Adeyinka
Journal of Animal and Veterinary Advances , 2012,
Abstract: A study was conducted in semi-arid north east Nigeria between 1995 and 1998 through monthly visits to 950 grazing units of agropastoral goats distributed in three study locations of Jakusko, Dapchi and Jajimaji on performance of Borno white goat breed. Using mature Borno white does events such as births, pre and post weaning mortalities, milk production, growth at (1, 3 and 6 months), linear body measurements, age at first kidding, kidding interval were all recorded or calculated and analysed using the general linear model involving 324 kiddings. The Borno white goat recorded 1.94 kg and 1.92 kg birth weight; 4.82 kg and 4.73 kg (1 month); 8.24 kg and 8.09 kg (3 months) and 12.69 kg and 13.44 kg (6 months) and 2115 kg and 23.25 kg (mature) body weights for males and females respectively. Milk production and composition was 147.50 mL day 1; total solids 10.47, 4.52% protein, 4.59% fat, 5.89% solid non fat, 0.92% calcium, 0.52% phosphorus. Adult percent mortalities were 26.75% and 23.25% for males and females; while percent kid mortalities were 27.59, 26.64,and 25.00% for singles, twins and triplets, respectively. Age at first kidding, kidding interval (days) and litter size were 350.25, 251.92 and 2.04 respectively. Percent frequency of births as singles, twins and triplets were 30.74%, 64.66 and 4.59% respectively. Body weights for males and females were 4.50 kg and 3.49 kg (1 month); 8.80 kg and 9.30 kg (3 months) and 13.70 kg and 13.30 kg (6 months) of age respectively. Linear body measurements for males and females for height at withers (HAW) were 36.75 cm and 33.45 cm (1 month); 42.70 cm and 40.50 cm (3 months); and 46.61 cm and 48.40 cm (6 months) respectively. Heart girth (HG) values were 35.52 cm and 32.37 cm (1 month); 40.76 cm and 37.93 cm (3 months) and 46.20 cm and 43.33 cm (6 months) of age; while Body Length (BL) were 45.57 cm and 41.80 cm (1 month); 53.85 cm and 51.61 cm (3 months) and 61.60 cm and 60.02 cm (6 months) of age respectively. Mature linear body measurements for males and females were 61.43 cm and 65.73 cm heat girth; 55.70 cm and 50.25 cm body length and 59.75 cm and 61.35 cm height at withers, respectively. Results were all different (p<0.05) with males recording higher values than females in all parameters at the same age. Productivity index (kg/doe/year) for the Borno white goat was 18.72; while prediction equation for mature body weight was LW = - 12.64 + 0.148 (HG) + 0.195 (BL) + 0.051 (HAW). The productivity and reproductive traits of the agropastoral Borno white goat of semi-arid north east Nigeria are of great prospects for use in the near future; thus the genetic resource of the breed should be conserved.
Effect of Dietary Levels of Cooked Lablab purpureus Beans on the Performance of Broiler Chickens
F.O. Abeke,S.O. Ogundipe,A.A. Sekoni,I.A. Adeyinka
American Journal of Food Technology , 2008,
Abstract: A study was conducted to determine the response of broiler starter and finisher chicks to dietary levels of Lablab purpureus beans processed by boiling in water for 30 min at 100 °C. For both the starter and the finisher phases, seven isonitrogenous diets containing 23.78% crude protein for the starter and 20.91% crude protein for the finisher were formulated to contain lablab seed meal at 0.0, 5.0, 10.0, 15.0, 20.0, 25.0 and 30.0% levels respectively. Diet 1, in each phase had no lablab and served as the control. Each dietary treatment for the starter and the finisher phases was replicated three times in a completely randomized design. There were 25 birds per replicate. Feed and water were given ad libitum. The experiment lasted from 0 to 4 weeks for the starter phase and from 5 to 8 weeks for the finisher phase. Results obtained for the starter phase shows significant (p<0.05) depression in final weight, weight gain, feed intake, feed efficiency and feed-gain ratio. These parameters decreased as the level of lablab seeds in the diets increased. However, feed cost (/kg feed and /bird) were significantly (p<0.05) reduced as the level of lablab seed meal increased in the starter diets. The results obtained for the finisher phase also showed a similar trend. While there were significant (p<0.05) decreases in final weight, weight gain, feed intake and feed efficiency as the level of lablab seed meal increased in the diets, feed cost (/kg feed and /bird) were significantly (p<0.05) lowered. Parameters measured for carcass analysis such as live weight and weights of the breast, thigh, wing, neck, legs and head showed a significant (p<0.05) decrease as the dietary levels of lablab seed meal increased. The PCV, Hb and the TP status of the blood indicated significant (p<0.05) decreases as the levels of lablab in the diets increased. However, Lablab purpureus beans can be included up to 5% level in broiler starter and up to 10% level in broiler finisher diets without any adverse effect on the performance of the birds.
Effects of Underfeeding on Semen Quality of Rhode Island Cocks
M. Kabir,O.O. Oni,G.N. Akpa,I.A. Adeyinka
Pakistan Journal of Biological Sciences , 2007,
Abstract: Fifty Rhode Island chickens were randomly assigned to five treatments with ten cocks in each treatment. Group I cocks (full fed control) received 140 g of a 16% CP growers ration per cock per day. Cocks in Group II, III, IV and V received 98, 70, 42 and 28 g of the same ration per cock per day, representing 70, 50, 30 and 20% of Group I intake, respectively. The feeding trials lasted for 8 weeks during which one ejaculate per day was collected from each cock using the massage technique. The ejaculated semen samples were subjected to both physical and biochemical evaluations. Results showed that cocks that were severely underfed (i.e., Groups IV and V) took significantly longer time (p<0.01) to ejaculate. In addition, ejaculation failures were encountered more frequently with the severely underfed cocks than in cocks that were moderately underfed (i.e., Groups II and III). There were however, no significant differences in most of the biochemical parameters between cocks I all the treatment groups. Ejaculate volume, progressive sperm motility and sperm concentration were significantly depressed (p<0.01) in the severely underfed cocks than in the moderately underfed cocks. Thus, this study revealed that providing Rhode Island red and white cocks with one-half to three-quarter (i.e., 50-70%) of their normal daily ration would neither undermine their semen producing ability nor affect their semen quality adversely.
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