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Search Results: 1 - 10 of 1062 matches for " Holly Jacobson "
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Lo que crees que has dicho no es lo que creen que has dicho. Los efectos de los actos de habla en la comunicación transcultural
Holly Jacobson
Panace@ : Revista de Medicina, Lenguaje y Traducción , 2001,
Abstract:
La comunicación con pacientes hispano-hablantes en Estados Unidos
Holly E. Jacobson
Panace@ : Revista de Medicina, Lenguaje y Traducción , 2001,
Abstract:
Evaluating the disparity of female breast cancer mortality among racial groups - a spatiotemporal analysis
Chiehwen Ed Hsu, Holly Jacobson, Francisco Soto Mas
International Journal of Health Geographics , 2004, DOI: 10.1186/1476-072x-3-4
Abstract: The Spatial Scan Statistic was employed to examine the geographic excess of breast cancer mortality by race in Texas counties between 1990 and 2001. The statistic was conducted with a scan window of a maximum of 90% of the study period and a spatial cluster size of 50% of the population at risk. The next scan was conducted with a purely spatial option to verify whether the excess mortality persisted further. Spatial queries were performed to locate the regions of excess mortality affecting multiple racial groups.The first scan identified 4 regions with breast cancer mortality excess in both non-Hispanic White and Hispanic female populations. The most likely excess mortality with a relative risk of 1.12 (p = 0.001) occurred between 1990 and 1996 for non-Hispanic Whites, including 42 Texas counties along Gulf Coast and Central Texas. For Hispanics, West Texas with a relative risk of 1.18 was the most probable region of excess mortality (p = 0.001). Results of the second scan were identical to the first. This suggested that the excess mortality might not persist to the present decade. Spatial queries found that 3 counties in Southeast and 9 counties in Central Texas had excess mortality involving multiple racial groups.Spatiotemporal variations in breast cancer mortality affected racial groups at varying levels. There was neither evidence of hot-spot clusters nor persistent spatiotemporal trends of excess mortality into the present decade. Non-Hispanic Whites in the Gulf Coast and Hispanics in West Texas carried the highest burden of mortality, as evidenced by spatial concentration and temporal persistence.According to a recently released U.S. Cancer Statistics report, breast cancer was the leading cause of cancer deaths among American women in all racial/ethnic groups in the year 2000. [1] National and state-specific studies indicated that the distribution of breast cancer mortality varied by race in Texas over an extended period of time. Spatiotemporal variations obs
Un currículo interdisciplinario de base teórica para ense?ar inglés como segunda lengua
Fuentes,Brenda O; Soto Mas,Francisco; Mein,Erika; Jacobson,Holly E.;
Colombian Applied Linguistics Journal , 2011,
Abstract: among hispanic immigrants in the united states (us), learning english is considered necessary for economic and social achievement. as a consequence, there is a high demand for english as a second language (esl) classes. despite the recognized benefits of esl programs, both at the individual and social levels, more research is needed to identify education strategies that effectively promote all aspects of learning english as a second language. this article describes an esl curriculum that incorporates a theory-based pedagogical approach specifically designed for immigrant hispanic adults on the us-mexico border region. the article also describes the implementation of the curriculum as well as the results of the evaluation, which was conducted using both quantitative and qualitative methods. quantitative results indicate that the participants significantly improved their english proficiency (l2). qualitative results suggest that participants were positively impacted by both the content and pedagogical approaches used by the curriculum. their experience with the esl class was positive in general. it can be concluded that the curriculum achieved its objective. this approach could serve as a model for second language teaching for adults.
Hispanic physicians' tobacco intervention practices: a cross-sectional survey study
Francisco G Soto Mas, Richard L Papenfuss, Holly E Jacobson, Chiehwen Ed Hsu, Ximena Urrutia-Rojas, William M Kane
BMC Public Health , 2005, DOI: 10.1186/1471-2458-5-120
Abstract: Data was collected through a validated survey instrument among a cross-sectional sample of self-reported Hispanic physicians. Data analyses included frequencies, descriptive statistics, and factorial analyses of variance.The response rate was 55.5%. The majority of respondents (73.3%) were middle-age males. Less than half of respondents routinely performed the most basic intervention: asking patients about smoking status (44.4%) and advising smoking patients to quit (42.2%). Twenty-five percent assisted smoking patients by talking to them about the health risks of smoking, providing education materials or referring them to cessation programs. Only 4.4% routinely arranged follow-up visits or phone calls for smoking patients. The majority of respondents (64.4%) indicated that they prescribe cessation treatments to less than 20% of smoking patients. A few (4.4%) routinely used behavioral change techniques or programs. A minority (15.6%) indicated that they routinely ask their patients about exposure to tobacco smoke, and 6.7% assisted patients exposed to secondhand smoke in understanding the health risks associated with environmental tobacco smoke (ETS). The most frequently encountered barriers preventing respondents from intervening with patients who smoke included: time, lack of training, lack of receptivity by patients, and lack of reimbursement by third party payers. There was no significant main effect of type of physician, nor was there an interaction effect (gender by type of physician), on tobacco-related practices.The results indicate that Hispanic physicians, similarly to U.S. physicians in general, do not meet the level of intervention recommended by health care agencies. The results presented will assist in the development of tobacco training initiatives for Hispanic physicians.Few studies have reported on the particular perspectives and actual practices of U.S. Hispanic physicians with respect to tobacco counseling and smoking cessation. There is a scarcit
Snow Water Equivalent Estimation for a Snow-Covered Prairie Grass Field by GPS Interferometric Reflectometry  [PDF]
Mark D. Jacobson
Positioning (POS) , 2012, DOI: 10.4236/pos.2012.33005
Abstract: The amount of water stored in snowpack is the single most important measurement for the management of water supply and flood control systems. The available water content in snow is called the snow water equivalent (SWE). The product of snow density and depth provides an estimate of SWE. In this paper, snow depth and density are estimated by a nonlinear least squares fitting algorithm. The inputs to this algorithm are global positioning system (GPS) signals and a simple GPS interferometric reflectometry (GPS-IR) model. The elevation angles of interest at the GPS receiving antenna are between 50 and 300. A snow-covered prairie grass field experiment shows potential for inferring snow water equivalent using GPS-IR. For this case study, the average inferred snow depth (17.9 cm) is within the in situ measurement range (17.6 cm ± 1.5 cm). However, the average inferred snow density (0.13 g.cm-3) overestimates the in situ measurements (0.08 g.cm-3 ± 0.02 g.cm-3). Consequently, the average inferred SWE (2.33 g.cm-2) also overestimates the in situ calculations (1.38 g.cm-2 ± 0.36 g.cm-2).
Essential Tremor in the Elderly and Risk for Dementia
Holly A. Shill,Joseph G. Hentz,Sandra A. Jacobson,Christine Belden,Marwan N. Sabbagh,Thomas G. Beach,Erika Driver-Dunckley,Charles H. Adler
Journal of Neurodegenerative Diseases , 2014, DOI: 10.1155/2014/328765
Abstract: The objective is to examine the risk of dementia in subjects with essential tremor (ET) involved in the Arizona Study of Aging and Neurodegenerative Disorders. All subjects were free of a neurodegenerative diagnosis at baseline and had annual motor, general neurological, and neuropsychological assessments. Subjects with ET were compared with controls for the risk of dementia. There were 83 subjects with ET and 424 subjects without tremor. Mean age at study entry was for ET and for controls. Median tremor duration was 5.2 years at study entry. Followup was a median of 5.4 years (range 0.9 to 12.1). The hazard ratio for the association between ET and dementia was 0.79 (95% CI 0.33 to 1.85). The hazard ratio for the association between tremor onset at age 65 or over, versus onset before age 65, was 2.1 (95% CI 0.24 to 18) and the hazard ratio for the association between tremor duration greater than 5 years, versus less than 5 years, was 0.46 (95% CI 0.08 to 2.6). We conclude that all elderly ET was not associated with an increased risk of dementia but that a subset of subjects with older age onset/shorter duration tremor may be at higher risk. 1. Introduction Essential tremor (ET) is a common neurological condition which increases with the age of the population and contributes to significant disability in most affected patients. Previous cross-sectional studies have shown that patients with ET may have minor cognitive deficits on formal testing although most of these older studies have been done with advanced ET patients being assessed for deep brain stimulation as treatment for tremor [1, 2]. More recently, a population study of ET demonstrated that more mildly affected, largely untreated ET individuals may be more likely to complain of memory problems and have deficits at testing [3]. This same population was more likely to have prevalent dementia, largely driven by elderly onset ET [4]. In those nondemented at baseline, incident dementia was greater in ET [5]. This study seeks to compare the risk of developing dementia in subjects with ET versus controls without tremor in a large, well-categorized cohort of individuals involved in a longitudinal aging study, the Arizona Study of Aging and Neurodegenerative Disorders (AZSAND). 2. Methods Participants without dementia or another neurodegenerative disorder at study entry and who had at least one follow-up visit were selected from the 23 May 2013 version of the AZSAND database which included 3300 subjects. All participants, both cases and controls, were initially recruited into the study largely as a result
A taxonomy of dignity: a grounded theory study
Nora Jacobson
BMC International Health and Human Rights , 2009, DOI: 10.1186/1472-698x-9-3
Abstract: Grounded theory procedures were use to analyze literature pertaining to dignity and to conduct and analyze 64 semi-structured interviews with persons marginalized by their health or social status, individuals who provide health or social services to these populations, and people working in the field of health and human rights.The taxonomy presented identifies two main forms of dignity–human dignity and social dignity–and describes several elements of these forms, including the social processes that violate or promote them, the conditions under which such violations and promotions occur, the objects of violation and promotion, and the consequences of dignity violation. Together, these forms and elements point to a theory of dignity as a quality of individuals and collectives that is constituted through interaction and interpretation and structured by conditions pertaining to actors, relationships, settings, and the broader social order.The taxonomy has several implications for work in health and human rights. It suggests a map to possible points of intervention and provides a language in which to talk about dignity.Dignity has long been prominent in the discourses of both health and human rights. In health and healthcare, dignity is featured in many professional practice codes, is a key concept in fields like palliative and long-term care, and also arises in discussions of healthcare service delivery performance and reform [1-5]. Although somewhat controversial in North America, dignity is central to the "new bioethics" that has emerged in Europe over the last decade [6-8]. Dignity and human rights are historically and conceptually coupled in the Universal Declaration of Human Rights [9-11]. Actions taken to respect, protect, and fulfill human rights promote dignity, while those that violate human rights also violate dignity.As signaled by its title, this paper has its origins in Jonathan Mann's insight that dignity is not only fundamental to health and human rights
Empowering the physician-patient relationship: The effect of the Internet
Pearl Jacobson
Partnership : the Canadian Journal of Library and Information Practice and Research , 2007,
Abstract: Objectives: This review aims to explore the relationship between patient empowermentand the physician-patient relationship in the context of the clinical encounter. Difficultiesand opportunities presented by patients’ use of the Internet are presented from theperspectives of both patients and health care providers. The review explores roles forlibrarians in facilitating communication and informed decision-making in the clinicalconsultation.Methods: Medline was searched using the MeSH terms Physician-Patient Relations,Internet /utilization, Power (Psychology) and Information Services. Scholars Portal wassearched using the keywords Internet, Empowerment, and Consumer HealthInformation.Main Findings: Studies on how the Internet affects patients’ experience ofempowerment within the clinical encounter have shown mixed outcomes. Whilepatients’ desire to use the Internet for health information is increasing, some patientsare reluctant to discuss this information in the clinical encounter for fear of challengingthe physician’s authority. Some physicians express frustration in dealing with patientswho search for information online, while others describe the Internet as beneficial.Conclusions: While searching the Internet is often personally empowering for patients,this sense of empowerment does not necessarily translate into self-efficacy ininteractions with health care providers. Whether health information found on the Internetis empowering for patients in clinical consultations appears to depend on the powerrelations between patients and practitioners, how patients use the information theyretrieve, as well as on physicians’ affective responses to these patients. Librarians havea role to play in educating health care consumers and mediating the exchange ofinformation between practitioner and patient.
Empowering the physician-patient relationship: The effect of the Internet
Pearl Jacobson
Partnership : the Canadian Journal of Library and Information Practice and Research , 2007,
Abstract: Objectives: This review aims to explore the relationship between patient empowerment and the physician-patient relationship in the context of the clinical encounter. Difficulties and opportunities presented by patients’ use of the Internet are presented from the perspectives of both patients and health care providers. The review explores roles for librarians in facilitating communication and informed decision-making in the clinical consultation. Methods: Medline was searched using the MeSH terms Physician-Patient Relations, Internet /utilization, Power (Psychology) and Information Services. Scholars Portal was searched using the keywords Internet, Empowerment, and Consumer Health Information. Main Findings: Studies on how the Internet affects patients’ experience of empowerment within the clinical encounter have shown mixed outcomes. While patients’ desire to use the Internet for health information is increasing, some patients are reluctant to discuss this information in the clinical encounter for fear of challenging the physician’s authority. Some physicians express frustration in dealing with patients who search for information online, while others describe the Internet as beneficial. Conclusions: While searching the Internet is often personally empowering for patients, this sense of empowerment does not necessarily translate into self-efficacy in interactions with health care providers. Whether health information found on the Internet is empowering for patients in clinical consultations appears to depend on the power relations between patients and practitioners, how patients use the information they retrieve, as well as on physicians’ affective responses to these patients. Librarians have a role to play in educating health care consumers and mediating the exchange of information between practitioner and patient.
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