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Search Results: 1 - 10 of 18732 matches for " Hilal Al Shidi "
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Shifting to Renewable Energy to Mitigate Carbon Emissions: Initiatives by the States of Gulf Cooperation Council  [PDF]
Hilal Al Shidi, Hameed Sulaiman, Patrick Amoatey
Low Carbon Economy (LCE) , 2016, DOI: 10.4236/lce.2016.73012
Abstract: The Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC) countries approximately have 40% of world’s proven oil reserves and 21.7% of world’s known gas reserves. Low energy costs compiled with low taxation make it lucrative to foreign energy-intensive companies to operate in the region. Energy consumption in GCC has increased by 74% in the period between 2000 and 2010 and it is projected to increase by approximately 10% to 15% between 2010 and 2020. Embracing the general commitment by GCC states to reduce greenhouse gas emission (GHG) of United Nation Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) has started the process of environmental awakening in the GCC countries due to its high vulnerability to the effects of climate change. This paper reviews the trends in shift to renewable energy with reference to GCC and also the co-benefits of investing in renewable energy. Solar plant and Building-Integrated Photo-Voltaic (BIPV) systems are the most invested projects. However in the long run, policies and strategies are needed to ensure the successful and larger implementation of mitigation objectives.
Intelligent Parking Management System Based on Image Processing  [PDF]
Hilal Al-Kharusi, Ibrahim Al-Bahadly
World Journal of Engineering and Technology (WJET) , 2014, DOI: 10.4236/wjet.2014.22006
Abstract: This paper aims to present an intelligent system for parking space detection based on image processing technique. The proposed system captures and processes the rounded image drawn at parking lot and produces the information of the empty car parking spaces. In this work, a camera is used as a sensor to take photos to show the occupancy of car parks. The reason why a camera is used is because with an image it can detect the presence of many cars at once. Also, the camera can be easily moved to detect different car parking lots. By having this image, the particular car parks vacant can be known and then the processed information was used to guide a driver to an available car park rather than wasting time to find one. The proposed system has been developed in both software and hardware platform. An automatic parking system is used to make the whole process of parking cars more efficient and less complex for both drivers and administrators.
Management of Internal Mammary Artery Spasm  [PDF]
Edam Ziadinov, Nasser Al-Kemyani, Hilal Al-Sabti
International Journal of Clinical Medicine (IJCM) , 2014, DOI: 10.4236/ijcm.2014.55042
Abstract:

The article is dedicated to the management of internal mammary artery spasm intra- and postoperatively based on the accumulated evidence in the literature. It provides a stepwise decision algorithm for safely resolving the spasm and prevention of relapse.

Therapeutic angiogenesis in cardiovascular disease
Hilal Al Sabti
Journal of Cardiothoracic Surgery , 2007, DOI: 10.1186/1749-8090-2-49
Abstract: In the 20th century, the number of patients affected by atherosclerosis increased dramatically. Cardiovascular disease due to atherosclerosis had become the first cause of death worldwide as compared to infectious diseases at the beginning of the century. The natural history of atherosclerosis can be divided into three stages:? Stage I: Asymptomatic fatty streak and fibrous plaque formation.? Stage II: Symptomatic: Formation of fibrous plaque with medial calcification; enlargement of the fibrous plaque and thrombus formation; significant homodynamic occlusion of the vessel and then complete occlusion.? Stage III: Where three major complications are seen:- Myocardial infarction.- Brain infarction.- Gangrene.The risk factors for having atherosclerotic disease are age, hyperlipidemia, smoking, hypertension, physical inactivity, obesity and hormone status. The conventional management of atherosclerotic arterial insufficiency can be divided into three major parts:? Risk factors modification and medical treatment in order to restore the balance between the oxygen demand and oxygen supply and prevention of acute thrombotic episodes, these can be achieved by: Lifestyle modification (exercise, smoking cessation, weight reduction), and Cholesterol lowering. Another risk factor modification is Blood pressure management through the following therapies like Aspirin therapy, Beta- blocker, ACE inhibitors. And the last is through interventional therapy which is divided into: Surgical: Includes aorto-coronary bypass, transmyocardial revascularization (TMR) and peripheral vascular bypass and catheter-based: which include percutanous trans-coronary angioplasty and stenting or coronary atherectomy.Despite the improvement of these interventions and outcomes there are many patients that are not suitable candidates because of their diffuse and severe atherosclerotic CAD and/or because of the risky nature of the intervention. Hence the idea came of promoting and stimulating the process of
Stakeholders’ Views on Management Arrangements: A Case of Kingfish Fishery in the Sultanate of Oman  [PDF]
Abdullah Hilal Al-Balushi, Shekar Bose, Anesh Govender
Natural Resources (NR) , 2016, DOI: 10.4236/nr.2016.75022
Abstract: This paper exemplifies a primary step towards eliciting primary and secondary stakeholders’ views on management issues pertaining to kingfish fishery in Oman, and potential options for effective management of the fishery using questionnaire surveys and focus group interviews. There was consensus from stakeholder groups which included fishers, fishery managers, and fishery scientists that the current stock condition is not biologically sustainable. It is found that fishing effort control and technical measures are preferred to catch control by both groups. The role of mass media and the traditional institution in communicating fisheries issues are found to be relatively minor. Although the overall rating on the comprehensiveness of the proposed plan is promising, there are significant differences between the two groups with regard to legislative arrangements (χ2 = 24.793, p-value = 0.000), management goals (χ2 = 16.206, p-value = 0.001), operational objectives (χ2 = 19.884, p-value = 0.000), performance indicators (χ2 = 15.524, p-value = 0.001), and measures (χ2 = 13.483, p-value = 0.004). Policy implications of the key findings are discussed in both national and regional contexts. Management authorities can use these findings to design an appropriate plan of actions for achieving sustainability in this fishery.
An Assessment of Frequent Haemolytic Crisis in G6PD Deficiency Subjects Linked with Chronic Disease States in Al Ahsa Community, Saudi Arabia  [PDF]
Promise Emeka, Hussien Al Hilal, Afzal H. Asif, Ahmed Almukhalaf, Tahir Khan
Health (Health) , 2015, DOI: 10.4236/health.2015.75074
Abstract: The main treatment strategy for glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency is averting the use of oxidative precipitants like drugs or foods that trigger haemolysis. However, subjects could experience acute crisis in a comorbidity state of diabetes, hypertension or infection. In addition, the condition could in turn predispose carriers to these chronic diseases. Aim of the study was to evaluate the frequency of haemolytic crisis in carriers with attendant chronic diseases, and also assess awareness and knowledge of aggravated reactions from these conditions. 282 subjects consented and participated in the study. A cross-sectional semi-structured interview questionnaire conducted from May to August 2013 was adopted. Questions focused on demographics, awareness and when disease was diagnosed, type and frequency of crisis, family history, screening and presence of other diseases and awareness of trigger from these conditions. A total of 69.9% were G6PD deficiency gene carriers and mostly fell within the age group of 31 - 40 (43.6%). 75.6% of the carriers were not aware that other disease conditions could exacerbate crisis. Non-drug related crisis was 85.3% compared with 14.7 drug related reactions. Out of the 69.9% carriers, 17.3% are diabetics, 18.3% of them are hypertensive and 25.9% are with bleeding disorders. Also, 29.1% had frequent episodes with bacterial infection. Symptoms experienced that were not drug related included, 44.8% attacks of pallor, 25.3% jaundice, 28.5% with shortness of breath, while 21.7% had dark urine frequently. No routine screening for other diseased conditions was carried out for these subjects despite experiencing frequent crisis that were not drug related. Carriers with other diseased conditions experienced more non-drug related crisis and were not aware of it.
A Method of Moment Approach in Solving Boundary Value Problems  [PDF]
Hilal M. El Misilmani, Karim Y. Kabalan, Mohamad Y. Abou-Shahine, Mohammed Al-Husseini
Journal of Electromagnetic Analysis and Applications (JEMAA) , 2015, DOI: 10.4236/jemaa.2015.73007
Abstract: Several available methods, known in literatures, are available for solving nth order differential equations and their complexities differ based on the accuracy of the solution. A successful method, known to researcher in the area of computational electromagnetic and called the Method of Moment (MoM) is found to have its way in this domain and can be used in solving boundary value problems where differential equations are resulting. A simplified version of this method is adopted in this paper to address this problem, and two differential equations examples are considered to clarify the approach and present the simplicity of the method. As illustrated in this paper, this approach can be introduced along with other methods, and can be considered as an attractive way to solve differential equations and other boundary value problems.
Wandering permanent pacemaker generators in children: a case series
Hilal Al Sabti, Raj Menon, Madan Maddali, John Valliattu
Journal of Medical Case Reports , 2008, DOI: 10.1186/1752-1947-2-163
Abstract: Three permanent epicardial pacemakers that migrated in an unusual manner producing intraabdominal complications are reported.The different clinical presentations of pacemaker migration in the pediatric age groups are highlighted and a few suggestions are made for avoiding such a complication.Cardiac pacing in the pediatric population typically results from bradycardia produced by sinus node dysfunction or atrioventricular [AV] block [1]. Although endocardial pacing requires less extensive surgery than does epicardial lead implantation, there is concern about vascular obstruction, AV valve integrity, and the limitations of lead accommodation in relation to somatic growth especially in early childhood. Hence permanent epicardial pacing is often chosen in early age groups. We report on three cases of migrating pacemakers each of which presented in a very unusual manner. The course of events, their individual management and preventive aspects are described.A 6-year-old boy was investigated for intermittent colicky pain in his abdomen. The child was afebrile with no signs of intestinal obstruction.During infancy, the child had undergone repair of an interrupted aortic arch and ventricular septal defect [VSD] closure as two staged procedures. Following the second operation, the child developed a complete heart block for which an adult epicardial pacemaker system (Sigma SSR 203, Medtronic, Inc. Minneapolis, USA) was implanted with the pulse generator in the epigastric region.When the child presented with abdominal manifestations it was found that the epigastric pocket where the generator was placed was empty. An abdominal X-ray (Figure 1) showed the pacemaker lying in the pelvis confirming the diagnosis of intraperitoneal pacemaker migration.Under general anesthesia, endovenous endocardial electrodes were inserted and a subpectoral generator placement was performed (Figure 2). At the same time, the old pulse generator was retrieved through a laparotomy. Resection and anast
Exercise electrocardiographic responses and serum cystatin C levels among metabolic syndrome patients without overt diabetes mellitus
Asli Tanindi, Hilal Olgun, Ayse Tuncel, et al
Vascular Health and Risk Management , 2011, DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/VHRM.S16638
Abstract: cise electrocardiographic responses and serum cystatin C levels among metabolic syndrome patients without overt diabetes mellitus Original Research (3718) Total Article Views Authors: Asli Tanindi, Hilal Olgun, Ayse Tuncel, et al Published Date February 2011 Volume 2011:7 Pages 59 - 65 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/VHRM.S16638 Asli Tanindi1 Hilal Olgun1 Ayse Tuncel2 Bulent Celik3 Hatice Pasaoglu2 Bulent Boyaci1 1Department of Cardiology, 2Department of Medical Biochemistry, Faculty of Medicine, 3Department of Statistics, Faculty of Health Sciences, Gazi University, Ankara, Turkey Objectives: An impaired heart rate response during exercise (chronotropic incompetence) and an impaired heart rate recovery (HRR) after exercise are predictors of cardiovascular risk and mortality. Cystatin C is a novel marker for cardiovascular disease. We aimed to investigate exercise electrocardiographic responses in patients with metabolic syndrome who were without overt diabetes mellitus, in addition to the association of serum cystatin C levels with the exercise electrocardiographic test results. Method: Forty-three consecutive patients admitted to a cardiology outpatient clinic without angina pectoris were recruited if they met criteria for metabolic syndrome but did not have overt diabetes mellitus. Serum cystatin C levels were measured, and all participants underwent exercise electrocardiographic testing. Patients who were found to have ischemia had a coronary angiography procedure. Results: The mean cystatin C level of patients was higher in metabolic syndrome group than healthy controls (610.1 ± 334.02 vs 337.3 ± 111.01 μg/L; P < 0.001). The percentage of patients with ischemia confirmed by coronary angiography was 13.9% in the metabolic syndrome group. Cystatin C levels in the ischemic patients of the metabolic syndrome group were higher than that in nonischemic patients (957.00 ± 375.6 vs 553.8 ± 295.3 μg /L; P = 0.005). Chronotropic incompetence was observed in 30.2% of the patients with metabolic syndrome compared with 16.7% in the control group (P = 0.186). Chronotropic response indices were 0.8 ± 0.18 versus 0.9 ± 0.10 for the two groups, respectively (P = 0.259). HRR was significantly lower in the metabolic syndrome patients compared with the controls (20.1 ± 8.01 vs 25.2 ± 4.5 per min; P , 0.001), and the ST-segment adjustment relative to heart rate(ST/HR index ratio) was 1.4 ± 1.34 versus 0.4 ± 0.31 μV/beat (P < 0.001), respectively. Cystatin C was negatively correlated with the chronotropic response index (CRI) and HRR and was positively correlated with ST/HR index in the entire study population (R = -0.658, -0.346, 0.388, respectively; P < 0.05). Conclusions: A substantial proportion of metabolic syndrome patients without overt diabetes mellitus had silent coronary ischemia in addition to impairment of objective exercise electrocardiographic parameters. In the metabolic syndrome patients without overt diabetes mellitus, cystatin C levels were found
Exercise electrocardiographic responses and serum cystatin C levels among metabolic syndrome patients without overt diabetes mellitus
Asli Tanindi,Hilal Olgun,Ayse Tuncel,et al
Vascular Health and Risk Management , 2011,
Abstract: Asli Tanindi1 Hilal Olgun1 Ayse Tuncel2 Bulent Celik3 Hatice Pasaoglu2 Bulent Boyaci11Department of Cardiology, 2Department of Medical Biochemistry, Faculty of Medicine, 3Department of Statistics, Faculty of Health Sciences, Gazi University, Ankara, TurkeyObjectives: An impaired heart rate response during exercise (chronotropic incompetence) and an impaired heart rate recovery (HRR) after exercise are predictors of cardiovascular risk and mortality. Cystatin C is a novel marker for cardiovascular disease. We aimed to investigate exercise electrocardiographic responses in patients with metabolic syndrome who were without overt diabetes mellitus, in addition to the association of serum cystatin C levels with the exercise electrocardiographic test results.Method: Forty-three consecutive patients admitted to a cardiology outpatient clinic without angina pectoris were recruited if they met criteria for metabolic syndrome but did not have overt diabetes mellitus. Serum cystatin C levels were measured, and all participants underwent exercise electrocardiographic testing. Patients who were found to have ischemia had a coronary angiography procedure.Results: The mean cystatin C level of patients was higher in metabolic syndrome group than healthy controls (610.1 ± 334.02 vs 337.3 ± 111.01 μg/L; P < 0.001). The percentage of patients with ischemia confirmed by coronary angiography was 13.9% in the metabolic syndrome group. Cystatin C levels in the ischemic patients of the metabolic syndrome group were higher than that in nonischemic patients (957.00 ± 375.6 vs 553.8 ± 295.3 μg /L; P = 0.005). Chronotropic incompetence was observed in 30.2% of the patients with metabolic syndrome compared with 16.7% in the control group (P = 0.186). Chronotropic response indices were 0.8 ± 0.18 versus 0.9 ± 0.10 for the two groups, respectively (P = 0.259). HRR was significantly lower in the metabolic syndrome patients compared with the controls (20.1 ± 8.01 vs 25.2 ± 4.5 per min; P , 0.001), and the ST-segment adjustment relative to heart rate(ST/HR index ratio) was 1.4 ± 1.34 versus 0.4 ± 0.31 μV/beat (P < 0.001), respectively. Cystatin C was negatively correlated with the chronotropic response index (CRI) and HRR and was positively correlated with ST/HR index in the entire study population (R = -0.658, -0.346, 0.388, respectively; P < 0.05).Conclusions: A substantial proportion of metabolic syndrome patients without overt diabetes mellitus had silent coronary ischemia in addition to impairment of objective exercise electrocardiographic parameters. In the metabolic syndrome pati
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