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Search Results: 1 - 10 of 286 matches for " Herth FJ "
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Characterization of outcomes 1 year after endoscopic thermal vapor ablation for patients with heterogeneous emphysema
Herth FJ,Ernst A,Baker KM,Egan JJ
International Journal of COPD , 2012,
Abstract: Felix JF Herth,1 Armin Ernst,2 Kimberly M Baker,3 Jim J Egan,4 Mark H Gotfried,5 Peter Hopkins,6 Franz Stanzel,7 Arschang Valipour,8 Manfred Wagner,9 Christian Witt,10 Steven Kesten,11 Gregory Snell121Pneumology and Critical Care Medicine, Thoraxklinik Heidelberg, Heidelberg, Germany; 2St Elizabeth's Medical Center, Boston, MA, USA; 3University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA, USA; 4Advanced Lung Disease Program, Mater Misericordiae University Hospital, Dublin, Ireland; 5Pulmonary Associates, Phoenix, AZ, USA; 6Lung Transplant Unit, Prince Charles Hospital, Chermside, Australia; 7Zentrum für Pneumologie, Hemer, Germany; 8Ludwig-Boltzmann-Institute for COPD, Otto-Wagner-Hospital, Vienna, Austria; 9Klinikum Nürnberg, Nürnberg, Germany; 10Pneumology, Charité Campus-Mitte, Berlin, Germany; 11Uptake Medical Corp, Tustin, CA, USA; 12Allergy Immunology and Respiratory Medicine, The Alfred Hospital, Melbourne, AustraliaIntroduction: Endoscopic lung volume reduction has been developed as a therapeutic option for advanced emphysema. Six-month results following treatment with endoscopic thermal vapor ablation (InterVapor ; Uptake Medical, Tustin, CA) were described previously, and here we report observations from the 12-month assessment.Methods: Two multicenter, international, single-arm trials of InterVapor (unilateral upper lobe treatment) in patients with upper lobe predominant emphysema were conducted. Inclusion criteria: forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1) 15%–45% predicted, residual volume > 150%, total lung capacity > 100%, 6-minute walk distance (6MWD) > 140 m, and diffusing capacity for carbon monoxide > 20% predicted. Efficacy endpoints: spirometry, body plethysmography, lung volumes by high-resolution computed tomography, St George's Respiratory Questionnaire, modified Medical Research Council dyspnea scale, and 6MWD. All adverse events were collected and independently adjudicated.Results: Forty four patients were treated at a mean (standard deviation) age of 63 (5.6) years, FEV1 0.86 mL (0.25 mL) (n = 22 men and 22 women). Mean (standard deviation) changes from baseline at 12 months were: FEV1 86.2 mL (173.8 mL), St George's Respiratory Questionnaire -11.0 (14.0) units, treated lobar volume from high-resolution computed tomography -751.8 mL (653.9 mL), residual volume -302.8 mL (775.6 mL), 6MWD 18.5 m (63.7 m), and modified Medical Research Council dyspnea scale score -0.83 (0.97) (P < 0.05 for all except 6MWD). Improvements were numerically larger at 6 versus 12 months. GOLD stage III and IV patients had similar outcomes at 6 months; however, improveme
Characterization of outcomes 1 year after endoscopic thermal vapor ablation for patients with heterogeneous emphysema
Herth FJ, Ernst A, Baker KM, Egan JJ, Gotfried MH, Hopkins P, Stanzel F, Valipour A, Wagner M, Witt C, Kesten S, Snell G
International Journal of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease , 2012, DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/COPD.S31082
Abstract: racterization of outcomes 1 year after endoscopic thermal vapor ablation for patients with heterogeneous emphysema Original Research (1446) Total Article Views Authors: Herth FJ, Ernst A, Baker KM, Egan JJ, Gotfried MH, Hopkins P, Stanzel F, Valipour A, Wagner M, Witt C, Kesten S, Snell G Published Date July 2012 Volume 2012:7 Pages 397 - 405 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/COPD.S31082 Received: 21 February 2012 Accepted: 28 March 2012 Published: 18 July 2012 Felix JF Herth,1 Armin Ernst,2 Kimberly M Baker,3 Jim J Egan,4 Mark H Gotfried,5 Peter Hopkins,6 Franz Stanzel,7 Arschang Valipour,8 Manfred Wagner,9 Christian Witt,10 Steven Kesten,11 Gregory Snell12 1Pneumology and Critical Care Medicine, Thoraxklinik Heidelberg, Heidelberg, Germany; 2St Elizabeth's Medical Center, Boston, MA, USA; 3University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA, USA; 4Advanced Lung Disease Program, Mater Misericordiae University Hospital, Dublin, Ireland; 5Pulmonary Associates, Phoenix, AZ, USA; 6Lung Transplant Unit, Prince Charles Hospital, Chermside, Australia; 7Zentrum für Pneumologie, Hemer, Germany; 8Ludwig-Boltzmann-Institute for COPD, Otto-Wagner-Hospital, Vienna, Austria; 9Klinikum Nürnberg, Nürnberg, Germany; 10Pneumology, Charité Campus-Mitte, Berlin, Germany; 11Uptake Medical Corp, Tustin, CA, USA; 12Allergy Immunology and Respiratory Medicine, The Alfred Hospital, Melbourne, Australia Introduction: Endoscopic lung volume reduction has been developed as a therapeutic option for advanced emphysema. Six-month results following treatment with endoscopic thermal vapor ablation (InterVapor ; Uptake Medical, Tustin, CA) were described previously, and here we report observations from the 12-month assessment. Methods: Two multicenter, international, single-arm trials of InterVapor (unilateral upper lobe treatment) in patients with upper lobe predominant emphysema were conducted. Inclusion criteria: forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1) 15%–45% predicted, residual volume > 150%, total lung capacity > 100%, 6-minute walk distance (6MWD) > 140 m, and diffusing capacity for carbon monoxide > 20% predicted. Efficacy endpoints: spirometry, body plethysmography, lung volumes by high-resolution computed tomography, St George's Respiratory Questionnaire, modified Medical Research Council dyspnea scale, and 6MWD. All adverse events were collected and independently adjudicated. Results: Forty four patients were treated at a mean (standard deviation) age of 63 (5.6) years, FEV1 0.86 mL (0.25 mL) (n = 22 men and 22 women). Mean (standard deviation) changes from baseline at 12 months were: FEV1 86.2 mL (173.8 mL), St George's Respiratory Questionnaire -11.0 (14.0) units, treated lobar volume from high-resolution computed tomography -751.8 mL (653.9 mL), residual volume -302.8 mL (775.6 mL), 6MWD 18.5 m (63.7 m), and modified Medical Research Council dyspnea scale score -0.83 (0.97) (P < 0.05 for all except 6MWD). Improvements were numerically larger at 6 versus 12 months. GOLD stage III an
Endobronchial ultrasound: A new innovation in bronchoscopy
Balamugesh T,Herth F
Lung India , 2009,
Abstract: Technical development in last two decades has made it possible for pulmonologists to do endobronchial ultrasound (EBUS). With EBUS mini-probe, the multilayered structure of the tracheobronchial wall can be analyzed better than any other imaging modality. Instead of fluoroscopic guided biopsy, EBUS can be used to biopsy peripheral lesions. EBUS-transbronchial needle aspiration has proved valuable for mediastinal lymph node staging of lung cancer. Studies have shown that EBUS is cost-effective as it reduces the need for more morbid and costly invasive procedure like mediastinoscopy or thoracotomy. Prospective studies are needed in India to see how EBUS will help in populations with high prevalence of tuberculosis.
Interprofessional Collaboration within Faculty Roles: Teaching, Service, and Research
June Alberto,Kaye Herth
Online Journal of Issues in Nursing , 2009,
Abstract: Interprofessional collaboration in education and practice has been promoted for over three decades by educational panels, professional/educational organizations, and grant funding agencies. Despite this long-standing focus on collaboration and the need for faculty to be highly productive in their teaching, service, and research roles, the literature remains sparse regarding the potential benefits and challenges of interprofessional collaborative efforts associated with each role. In this article, the authors review the literature by exploring terms associated with interprofessional collaboration, describing the collaboration imperative within healthcare, and presenting collaborative efforts within the academic setting. They also discuss interprofessional collaboration within faculty teaching, service, and research roles, sharing examples of their own collaborative experiences and some of the benefits and challenges of collaboration in each of these roles. The collaborating experiences they share illustrate how faculty, regardless of setting or nation, can themselves be successful both in collaborating activities and in integrating the three roles of teaching, service, and research, for the benefit of students, community, and professional practice.
The Chemistry of Gold Extraction (2nd edition) John O Marsden and C Iain House SME
FJ Alguacil
Gold Bulletin , 2006, DOI: 10.1007/BF03215543
Abstract:
Management of dyslipidaemia
FJ Raal
Continuing Medical Education , 2003,
Abstract:
Spatial-temporal variation in sex ratio and group size of ostriches (Struthio namelus) in the Serengeti National Park and environs in Northern Tanzania
FJ Magige
Tanzania Journal of Science , 2012,
Abstract: A study was conducted on variation in sex ratio and group size of ostriches (Struthio camelus) in Serengeti National Park and adjacent partially protected areas in northern Tanzania. Data were collected for two years (2005- 2006), along 388 km of roads. The two areas were compared with respect to ostrich sex ratio (male: female) and group size. Seasonal variation of these variables (sex ratio and group size) was also determined. Repetitive sampling showed an overall femaleskewed sex ratio, which was significantly different from unity. The sex ratio inside the National Park was also significantly skewed towards females, whereas that in the partially protected areas was skewed in favour of the males. There was a significant difference in sex ratios between the two areas (Chi square: !2 = 48.041, DF = 2, p<0.001). The grand median group size was 3 birds and the same median group size was obtained both in the National Park and partially protected areas, and there was no significant difference in group sizes between the areas (Median test: !2 = 1.861, DF = 1, p = 0.173) although bigger groups were observed in the park than in the partially protected areas. In addition, there was a tendency for ostriches to form significantly larger groups in the wet season than dry season in both areas (p<0.05). Natural predators of ostrich were found to be significantly higher inside the National Park than outside it (p<0.05). The presence of natural predators and seasonal variations may have influenced the present results.
Human-wildlife interaction in Serengeti and Ngorongoro districts of Tanzania: A case study on small mammals
FJ Magige
Tanzania Journal of Science , 2012,
Abstract: In the Serengeti and Ngorongoro Districts, small mammals are said to provide protein and income to the local people. However, they are simultaneously reported to conflict with farming activities. These conflicting aspects have not been investigated there. The present article considers humansmall mammal interactions in six villages adjacent to the protected areas. Data were obtained through questionnaire administration to the local people in the districts. Small mammals were hunted in the two districts for food purposes and some villagers declared that they were earning income from selling small mammals products. Seventy percent of the respondents in Serengeti District claimed that among the hunted small mammals, the rabbits were the most preferred animals whereas <5% of the respondents in Ngorongoro Districts declared to prefer rabbits. In terms of gender, there was no significant difference between males and females in the preference of rabbits in both districts. However, the frequency of hunting was higher in Serengeti District than in Ngorongoro District and dogs were significantly more used for hunting than were other means of hunting. Some small mammals, such as rodents, were a nuisance in raiding crop fields and food stores. In attempting to protect their crops and other properties against small mammal destruction, villagers used various strategies including trapping and poisoning although these methods were often ineffective. Some villagers suggested extermination of the small mammals as a control measure. Despite the fact that small mammals were destructive, about 26% (n =150) of respondents disagreed with the proposal of animal extermination, instead they suggested establishment of conservancies or seeking for the government intervention. Domestication of small animals for reptile farms, ecologically focused small mammal management techniques and improved storage structures might reduce the conflict.
The Dynamics of Early 19th Century Nupe Wars
FJ Kolapo
Scientia Militaria: South African Journal of Military Studies , 2003,
Abstract:
Morality as the substructure of social justice: religion in education as a case in point
FJ Potgieter
South African Journal of Education , 2011,
Abstract: Moral issues and principles do not only emerge in cases of conflict among, for instance, religious communities or political parties; indeed they form the moral substructure of notions of social justice. During periods of conflict each opponent claims justice for his/her side and bases the claim on certain principles. In this article, reference is made to the differences among South Africans about the extent to which religion and religious differences in the population should be accommodated in public school education. Explorative hermeneutic phenomenology facilitates an investigation into the nexus between social justice and its moral substructure. This is followed by a discussion of the moral dilemma facing education policymakers regarding the accommodation of religion in public education, with the aid of two contrasting metaphors, namely, the Strict Father and the Nurturant Parent.
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