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Search Results: 1 - 10 of 172223 matches for " Hendrée E. Jones "
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HIV Sexual and Drug-Use Risk in Drug-Dependent Pregnant Patients in Comprehensive Drug Treatment
Hendrée E. Jones,Wendee M. Wechsberg,Kevin E. O'Grady,Michelle Tuten
International Journal of Family Medicine , 2011, DOI: 10.1155/2011/872638
Abstract: This secondary analysis study investigated HIV sexual and drug-use risk in drug-dependent pregnant patients over the first month postrandomization to reinforcement-based treatment (RBT) ( ) or usual care (UC) ( ). Analysis of primary outcomes had indicated that RBT participants spent significantly longer time in treatment and recovery housing than UC participants. The present study examined the ability of 9 risk markers—age, race, estimated gestational age at treatment entry, lifetime substance abuse treatment episodes, history of prostitution charges, history of serious depression, current heroin injection status, current housing status, and current partner substance use—to predict changes in HIV risks. Sexual risk declined for participant subgroups with prostitution-charge histories and unstable housing. Drug-use risk declined for heroin injectors and nondepressed participants. A relationship was found between number of lifetime drug treatment episodes and sexual and drug-use risk. The role of risk markers in the response of drug-dependent pregnant women to drug treatment require attention. 1. Introduction Substance-abusing women in their reproductive years have relatively high HIV seroprevalence rates [1]. Perinatal transmission of HIV accounts for 90% of pediatric HIV infection [2]. Thus, women with substance use disorders who are also pregnant are an important population to reach for both preventive interventions and treatment [3]. Drug abuse treatment itself has been shown to serve as a protective factor for HIV drug use risks and has been shown to prevent HIV in nonpregnant patients. These results come primarily through reduction of HIV drug-risk behavior [4, 5]. As yet these same results have not been reported in pregnant women. Moreover, to the best of our knowledge, the use of drug abuse treatment to reduce HIV sexual risk behaviors has been inconsistent in nonpregnant patients and has not been shown in pregnant women. Although comprehensive addiction treatment programs for substance-abusing pregnant women have been shown to result in improved maternal and neonatal outcomes compared to no treatment [6], considerably less attention has been focused on examining the impact that comprehensive drug abuse treatment provided during pregnancy may have on reducing HIV sexual and drug-risk behaviors. In fact, to our knowledge, no empirical study has examined the extent to which comprehensive treatment for drug dependence given to drug-dependent pregnant women can reduce either or both primary sources of HIV risk (that is, sexual and drug-risk
Initial Feasibility and Acceptability of a Comprehensive Intervention for Methamphetamine-Using Pregnant Women in South Africa
Hendrée E. Jones,Bronwyn Myers,Kevin E. O’Grady,Stefan Gebhardt,Gerhard B. Theron,Wendee M. Wechsberg
Psychiatry Journal , 2014, DOI: 10.1155/2014/929767
Abstract: The purpose of the present study was to determine the feasibility, acceptability, and initial efficacy of a women-focused intervention addressing methamphetamine use and HIV sexual risk among pregnant women in Cape Town, South Africa. A two-group randomized pilot study was conducted, comparing a women-focused intervention for methamphetamine use and related sexual risk behaviors to a psychoeducational condition. Participants were pregnant women who used methamphetamine regularly, had unprotected sex in the prior month, and were HIV-negative. Primary maternal outcomes were methamphetamine use in the past 30 days, frequency of unprotected sexual acts in the past 30 days, and number of antenatal obstetrical appointments attended. Primary neonatal outcomes were length of hospital stay, birth weight, and gestational age at delivery. Of the 57 women initially potentially eligible, only 4 declined to participate. Of the 36 women who were eligible and enrolled, 92% completed all four intervention sessions. Women in both conditions significantly reduced their methamphetamine use and number of unprotected sex acts. Therefore, delivering comprehensive interventions to address methamphetamine use and HIV risk behaviors among methamphetamine-using pregnant women is feasible in South Africa. Further testing of these interventions is needed to address methamphetamine use in this vulnerable population. 1. Introduction Substance use during pregnancy is a critical health care concern. In Cape Town, South Africa, high rates of methamphetamine use have been found among women of childbearing age [1–3], including pregnant women [4]. Methamphetamine use is associated with several deleterious short- and long-term physical and psychological effects. A wide variety of physical effects have been associated with methamphetamine use, including respiratory and cardiac problems, palpitations, tremors, convulsions, stroke, and an increased risk of death [5]. Furthermore, its use is associated with risky sexual activities that place women at risk for acquiring HIV [1, 3, 6]. Psychological effects can be pronounced and include hallucinations, delusions, paranoia, and amphetamine psychosis [7]. Methamphetamine use has a high dependence risk and an extended withdrawal period, with frequent relapse. Prenatal stimulant exposure has been associated with being born small for gestational age [8], a risk factor for later developmental problems [9, 10] and poorer neurobehavioral outcomes [11]. Nonetheless, there are no substance use treatment models in South Africa that are tailored to address
A Comparison of Buprenorphine + Naloxone to Buprenorphine and Methadone in the Treatment of Opioid Dependence during Pregnancy: Maternal and Neonatal Outcomes
Ingunn O. Lund, Gabriele Fischer, Gabrielle K. Welle-Strand, Kevin E. O’Grady, Kimber Debelak, William R. Morrone and Hendrée E. Jones
Substance Abuse: Research and Treatment , 2012, DOI: 10.4137/SART.S10955
Abstract: Given that buprenorphine + naloxone is prescribed for opioid-dependent pregnant women, it is important to examine the extent to which it differs from buprenorphine alone, methadone, or methadone-assisted withdrawal on neonatal and maternal outcomes. Summary statistics on maternal and neonatal outcomes were collected from 7 previously published studies examining treatment for opioid-dependent pregnant women that represented a range of research methodologies. Outcomes from these studies were compared to the same outcomes for 10 women treated with the combined buprenorphine + naloxone product. There were no significant differences in maternal outcomes for buprenorphine + naloxone compared to buprenorphine, methadone, or methadone-assisted withdrawal. Preliminary findings suggest no significant adverse maternal or neonatal outcomes related to the use of buprenorphine + naloxone for the treatment of opioid dependence during pregnancy. However, further research should examine possible differences between buprenorphine + naloxone and buprenorphine alone or methadone in fetal physical development.
Process and Product in Cross-Cultural Treatment Research: Development of a Culturally Sensitive Women-Centered Substance Use Intervention in Georgia
Hendrée E. Jones,Irma Kirtadze,David Otiashvili,Kevin E. O’Grady,Keryn Murphy,William Zule,Evgeny Krupitsky,Wendee M. Wechsberg
Journal of Addiction , 2014, DOI: 10.1155/2014/163603
Abstract: Women who inject drugs (WID) are highly marginalized and stigmatized and experience ongoing discrimination in Georgia. Few opportunities exist for WID to receive publicly funded treatment for substance use disorders. The IMEDI (Investigating Methods for Enhancing Development in Individuals) project was developed in response to the need for women-specific and women-centered treatment services. This paper described our approach to understanding the Georgian culture—and WID within that culture—so that we could integrate two interventions for substance use found effective in other Western and non-Western cultures and to outline how we refined and adapted our integrated intervention to yield a comprehensive women-centered intervention for substance use. Reinforcement Based Treatment (RBT) and the Women’s CoOp (WC) were adapted and refined based on in-depth interviews with WID () and providers of health services () to such women and focus groups [2 with WID () and 2 with health service providers ()]. The resulting comprehensive women-centered intervention, RBT+WC, was then pretested and further refined in a sample of 20?WID. Results indicated positive pre-post changes in urine screening results and perceived needs for both RBT+WC and a case management control condition. The approach to treatment adaptation and the revised elements of RBT+WC are presented and discussed. 1. Background and Aims Injection-drug-using individuals are highly marginalized, highly stigmatized, and are at increased risk for STIs, HCV, and HIV worldwide [1]. Women who inject drugs (WID) experience this same marginalization, stigmatization, and increased risk for disease—without any recognition for the need for research and service delivery focused on their unique needs [1]. WID in Georgia are likewise highly marginalized and stigmatized and experience ongoing discrimination in Georgia. Although they represent up to 10% of the adult substance-using population [2, 3], only 1–5% of drug-related service beneficiaries are women [4, 5]. The World Health Organization [1] has recently called for worldwide efforts to provide treatment services for women to meet their unique needs, including physical abuse and violence. Women in Georgia who use illicit substances commonly experience emotional abuse, physical aggression, and sexual violence [6]. Such violations are rooted in social norms and traditions and a cultural environment that supports asymmetry in gender roles and places restrictions on women’s freedom and independence [7]. Recent economic problems in Georgia have facilitated women’s rise
Pregnant and Nonpregnant Women in Cape Town, South Africa: Drug Use, Sexual Behavior, and the Need for Comprehensive Services
Hendrée E. Jones,Felicia A. Browne,Bronwyn J. Myers,Tara Carney,Rachel Middlesteadt Ellerson,Tracy L. Kline,Winona Poulton,William A. Zule,Wendee M. Wechsberg
International Journal of Pediatrics , 2011, DOI: 10.1155/2011/353410
Abstract: The multiple risks associated with methamphetamine use are of serious concern for women. These risks and consequences are magnified during pregnancy. This secondary analysis of a parent study compared 26 pregnant to 356 nonpregnant women in Cape Town, South Africa, on selected demographic, psychosocial, and HIV-risk domains to identify their treatment service needs. Proportionally, more pregnant than nonpregnant women are using methamphetamine, =.01, although a very high rate of women used methamphetamine. Women reported similar monthly rates of sexual intercourse, but pregnant women were significantly less likely to report condom use, <.0001, maintaining their risky behavior. Both groups reported elevated Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression Scale CES-D means, suggesting a need for depression treatment. Results demonstrate a pervasive need for women's comprehensive treatment, regardless of pregnancy status. Moreover, findings support the urgent need for women-focused and pregnancy-specific treatment services for methamphetamine use. Finally, a job-skills training/employment component focus is suggested.
Initial Feasibility of a Woman-Focused Intervention for Pregnant African-American Women
Hendrée E. Jones,Nancy D. Berkman,Tracy L. Kline,Rachel Middlesteadt Ellerson,Felicia A. Browne,Winona Poulton,Wendee M. Wechsberg
International Journal of Pediatrics , 2011, DOI: 10.1155/2011/389285
Abstract: African-American women who use crack are vulnerable to HIV because of the complex social circumstances in which they live. Drug-abuse treatment for these women during pregnancy may provide time for changing risk behaviors. This paper examines the initial 6-month feasibility of a women-focused HIV intervention, the Women's CoOp, adapted for pregnant women, relative to treatment-as-usual among 59 pregnant African-American women enrolled in drug-abuse treatment. At treatment entry, the women were largely homeless, unemployed, practicing unsafe sex, and involved in violence. Results indicated marked reductions in homelessness, use of cocaine and illegal drugs, involvement in physical violence, and an increase in knowledge of HIV from baseline to 6-month followup for both conditions. Findings suggest that the Women's CoOp intervention could be successfully adapted to treat this hard-to-reach population. Future studies should examine the efficacy of the pregnancy-adapted Women's CoOp for women not enrolled in drug-abuse treatment.
Double jeopardy--drug and sex risks among Russian women who inject drugs: initial feasibility and efficacy results of a small randomized controlled trial
Wendee M Wechsberg, Evgeny Krupitsky, Tatiana Romanova, Edwin Zvartau, Tracy L Kline, Felicia A Browne, Rachel Ellerson, Georgiy Bobashev, William A Zule, Hendrée E Jones
Substance Abuse Treatment, Prevention, and Policy , 2012, DOI: 10.1186/1747-597x-7-1
Abstract: Women (N = 100) were randomized into one of two one-hour long intervention conditions--the Woman-Focused intervention (n = 51) or a time and attention-matched Nutrition control condition (n = 49).The results showed that 57% of the participants had been told that they were HIV-positive. At 3-month follow-up, both groups showed reduced levels of injecting frequency. However, participants in the Woman-Focused intervention reported, on average, a lower frequency of partner impairment at last sex act and a lower average number of unprotected vaginal sex acts with their main sex partner than the Nutrition condition.The findings suggest that improvements in sexual risk reduction are possible for these at-risk women and that more comprehensive treatment is needed to address HIV and drug risks in this vulnerable population.Russia is an emerging epicenter of the global HIV epidemic [1], accounting for 66% of all newly registered HIV cases in Eastern Europe and Eurasia [2]. The geographical nexus of Russia's HIV epidemic is St. Petersburg, with an HIV prevalence rate of 30-47% among injecting drug users (IDUs) [3]. Additionally, 80-90% of the HIV cases in St. Petersburg are associated with IDUs, many of whom are unaware of their HIV status [4-6]. Further, HIV morbidity is reported to be highest among IDUs in St. Petersburg [7].In earlier studies, Russian women in general and female IDUs in particular appeared to be at high risk of HIV, but HIV prevalence among them was relatively low [8,9]. However, between 1996 and 2006, the number of HIV-infected women increased rapidly from 29% to 44% [2,9]. In St. Petersburg, HIV prevalence among female IDUs was estimated to be 20% [10]. Consequently, there is a critical need to address the HIV risks of female IDUs [11-13].Because of the multifaceted risks women face, they are at high risk for contracting and spreading HIV. For example, sharing contaminated injecting equipment and sexual transmission are the main causes of HIV infection fo
Initial Feasibility of a Woman-Focused Intervention for Pregnant African-American Women
Hendrée E. Jones,Nancy D. Berkman,Tracy L. Kline,Rachel Middlesteadt Ellerson,Felicia A. Browne,Winona Poulton,Wendee M. Wechsberg
International Journal of Pediatrics , 2011, DOI: 10.1155/2011/389285
Abstract: African-American women who use crack are vulnerable to HIV because of the complex social circumstances in which they live. Drug-abuse treatment for these women during pregnancy may provide time for changing risk behaviors. This paper examines the initial 6-month feasibility of a women-focused HIV intervention, the Women's CoOp, adapted for pregnant women, relative to treatment-as-usual among 59 pregnant African-American women enrolled in drug-abuse treatment. At treatment entry, the women were largely homeless, unemployed, practicing unsafe sex, and involved in violence. Results indicated marked reductions in homelessness, use of cocaine and illegal drugs, involvement in physical violence, and an increase in knowledge of HIV from baseline to 6-month followup for both conditions. Findings suggest that the Women's CoOp intervention could be successfully adapted to treat this hard-to-reach population. Future studies should examine the efficacy of the pregnancy-adapted Women's CoOp for women not enrolled in drug-abuse treatment. 1. Introduction The risk of contracting HIV is one of the most devastating health threats African-American women who use crack cocaine face. HIV prevalence rates among African-American women range from a low rate of 1.7% among noninjecting drug users who do not trade sex to a high rate of 54% among homeless African-American women, many of whom trade sex for drugs and survival items [1–5]. Crack cocaine use also has been repeatedly associated with increased sexual activity; if the sex is unprotected, unplanned pregnancies and HIV can result [6, 7]. African-American women who use crack are vulnerable to HIV because of the complex social circumstances in which they live. These social circumstances may produce situations where these women engage in multiple high-risk HIV behaviors [8]. Furthermore, the combination of crack, alcohol use, and sexual-risk behaviors (e.g., trading sex for drugs or survival items, inconsistent condom use, multiple partners) place African-American women at greater risk for HIV infection than other drug-using groups [9]. Many of these crack-using African-American women lack self-sufficiency, rely on public assistance for long durations, are often unstably housed, experience repeated episodes of homelessness, have no or scanty employment records, lack education and job skills, and live in poverty [9–15]. The lives of substance-using African-American women also are often characterized by inflicting or being a victim of violence, crime, childhood and current sexual, physical, and emotional victimization, as well
VIOLENCIA Y ESTRéS POSTRAUMATICO VIOLENCE AND POSTRAUMATIC STRESS
E Jones
Revista Colombiana de Psiquiatría , 1999,
Abstract:
Template-Free Synthesis of Aligned Polyaniline Nanorods/Tubes and Copper/Copper Hydroxide Nanowires for Application as Fillers in Polymer Nanocomposites  [PDF]
Jasper Chiguma, Wayne E. Jones Jr.
Advances in Materials Physics and Chemistry (AMPC) , 2018, DOI: 10.4236/ampc.2018.81006
Abstract: Aligned polyaniline nanorods were synthesized in the presence of salicylic acid. Nanorods and nanotubes were also formed in the presence of camphorsulfonic acid (CSA) and para-toluenesulfonic acid (pTSA). Electrical conductivity measurements showed that the aligned nanorods had better electrical conductivity than the non-aligned nanostructures. Nanospheres were also observed in some cases. The formation of elongated nanostructures or spheres depended on the aniline monomer to surfactant molar ratio. This method in which nanostructures are formed using soft templates is often referred to as the template-free approach. Our success motivated us to explore the feasibility of obtaining similar metallic nanostructures without the use of a template. We successfully synthesized copper and copper hydroxide nanowires. While the copper nanowires formed as a mesh, the copper hydroxide nanowires formed as winding bundles. Upon switching the order in which the reactants were added, copper hydroxide nanoribbons were formed instead of bundles. Characterization of these nanostructures was done using Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM), Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM), Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) and the Four-point probe to measure electrical conductivity. Both metallic and organic nanowires that are fabricated by template-free methods are potential candidates for use as fillers in polymer nanocomposites. Polymer nanocomposites are found to be used in many advanced modern applications such as thermal interface materials in electronic devices which continue to be miniaturized, aerospace engineering where lightweight and robustness are important, sensors, medicine and catalytic activity.
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