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Search Results: 1 - 10 of 8540 matches for " Hans Schuster "
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Eduardo Llanos Melussa: Miniantología o eco desusado de la negación como voz interior
Schuster,Hans;
Literatura y lingüística , 2004, DOI: 10.4067/S0716-58112004001500010
Abstract: the article talks about the form and social topics of the last poetic production of the poet llanos melusa, his contradictions and the resource of the contradiction. the analysis is centered in the text entitled miniantología, which registers the conflicts of a period in latin america with its beats of blood and felony (argentina, chile, paraguay, etc). the author criticizes the dictatorial corruption and the assassins that the state in impunity maintains enjoying their retirement
Eduardo Llanos Melussa: Miniantología o eco desusado de la negación como voz interior
Hans Schuster
Literatura y lingüística , 2004,
Abstract: El artículo se refiere a la forma y tópicos sociales de la última producción poética del poeta Llanos Melusa, sus contradicciones y el recurso de la contradicción. El análisis se centra en el texto intitulado Miniantología, el cual registra los conflictos de una época en América Latina con sus golpes de sangre y felonía (Argentina, Chile, Paraguay, etc) Se critica la corrupción dictatorial y a los sicarios que mantiene el estado en la impunidad gozando de su jubilación The article talks about the form and social topics of the last poetic production of the poet Llanos Melusa, his contradictions and the resource of the contradiction. The analysis is centered in the text entitled Miniantología, which registers the conflicts of a period in Latin America with its beats of blood and felony (Argentina, Chile, Paraguay, etc). The author criticizes the dictatorial corruption and the assassins that the state in impunity maintains enjoying their retirement
Los palafitos..., o la conciencia de un paisaje alegórico en la declaración del poseso
Schuster G.,Hans;
Literatura y lingüística , 2003, DOI: 10.4067/S0716-58112003001400002
Abstract: this article deals with the most recent literary production in the south of chile. in the poetry book los palafitos (the palafittes) by mario garcía, the topics of fragmentation and anomalies of social reality are developed, which are profound cultural contradictions that continue inhabiting the dignity of the memory of the residents of the southern region. according to the writer of the prolog, sergio mansilla, the lyrical subject rejects socioeconomic modernization. professor schuster develops some theses starting with the strength of the metaphor that clarifies a system of reflexes of "non-existence". those absent would be captured through what is left unsaid. the "palaffite" is the imitative shape of human condition, the other edge, the place of those left out of the system, those that are not totally placed in the sea or on solid ground
Los palafitos..., o la conciencia de un paisaje alegórico en la declaración del poseso
Hans Schuster G.
Literatura y lingüística , 2003,
Abstract: El artículo se refiere a la reciente producción literaria valdiviana del Sur de Chile. En el libro de poemas Los Palafitos, de Mario García1, se da cuenta de la fragmentación y anomalías de la realidad social, profundas contradicciones culturales que continúan habitando en la dignidad de la memoria de los residentes de la zona Sur. Según el prologuista Sergio Mansilla, el sujeto lírico rechaza la modernización socioeconómica. El profesor Schuster releva algunas tesis a partir de la fuerza de la metáfora que objetiviza un sistema de reflejos de la no existencia. Los ausentes se captarían a través de lo no dicho. El palafito es la forma imitativa de la condición humana, la otra orilla, el lugar de los marginales que no están ubicados enteramente en el mar ni en tierra firme This article deals with the most recent literary production in the South of Chile. In the poetry book Los Palafitos (The Palafittes) by Mario García, the topics of fragmentation and anomalies of social reality are developed, which are profound cultural contradictions that continue inhabiting the dignity of the memory of the residents of the southern region. According to the writer of the prolog, Sergio Mansilla, the lyrical subject rejects socioeconomic modernization. Professor Schuster develops some theses starting with the strength of the metaphor that clarifies a system of reflexes of "non-existence". Those absent would be captured through what is left unsaid. The "palaffite" is the imitative shape of human condition, the other edge, the place of those left out of the system, those that are not totally placed in the sea or on solid ground
Hisactophilin is involved in osmoprotection in Dictyostelium
Tanja Pintsch, Hans Zischka, Stephan C Schuster
BMC Biochemistry , 2002, DOI: 10.1186/1471-2091-3-10
Abstract: We identified hisactophilin as one of the proteins that are enriched in the cytoskeletal fraction during osmotic shock. In mutants lacking hisactophilin, viability is reduced under hyperosmotic stress conditions. In wild type cells, serine phosphorylation of hisactophilin was specifically induced by hypertonicity, but not when other stress conditions were imposed on cells. The phosphorylation kinetics reveals a slow accumulation of phosphorylated hisactophilin from 20–60 min after onset of the hyperosmotic shock condition.In the present study, we identified hisactophilin as an essential protein for the osmoprotection of Dictyostelium cells. The observed phosphorylation kinetics suggest that hisactophilin regulation is involved in long-term osmoprotection and that phosphorylation occurs in parallel with inactivation of the dynamic actin cytoskeleton.Cells steadily face changes of the external osmolarity, to which they have to adapt. To withstand a steep increase in osmolarity, eukaryotic cells activate responses like "regulatory volume increase", accumulation of compatible osmolytes and stimulated expression of stress proteins [1-4]. Recently, an exception from this scheme has been identified: Dictyostelium cells protect themselves against hyperosmolarity by largely rearranging cellular proteins, whereas no "regulatory volume increase", no accumulation of compatible osmolytes and no change of the expression pattern of the most abundant proteins were observed [5]. Among the translocated proteins identified, cytoskeletal proteins appear to be predominant. In particular, the rearrangement of actin and myosin II to the cell cortex beneath the plasma membrane [6] was shown to constitute a pivotal element of osmoprotection in Dictyostelium. These two proteins form the core of a rigid network resembling a shell-like structure [7]. Conversely, DdLIM, a cytoskeletal protein involved in the formation of protrusions [8], is depleted from the cytoskeletal fraction under hyperton
Safety and Therapeutic Efficacy of the Lewis Y Carbohydrate Specific Humanized Antibody MB311 in Patients with Malignant Effusion  [PDF]
Thomas Bauernhofer, Helmut Samonigg, Peter Regitnik, Werner Weitzer, Brigitte Lileg, Günter Waxenecker, Susanne Wiederkum, Manuela Kainer, Manfred Schuster, Hans Loibner, Markus Fido, Ralf Kircheis, Andreas Nechansky
Journal of Cancer Therapy (JCT) , 2014, DOI: 10.4236/jct.2014.51004
Abstract:

Purpose: Investigation of safety and tolerability as well as therapeutic efficacy of the LeY specific humanized mAb MB311 in cancer pts with malignant effusions in a Phase II clinical trial. Experimental Design: An openlabel, single treatment arm, uncontrolled study with MB311 (100 mg per dose, intravenous infusion on day 1 and 7) in pts with malignant effusion (ascites or pleural effusion) was conducted with the primary objective to examine safety and tolerability as well as pharmacokinetics. Secondary objectives were assessment of pharmacodynamics, volumetric measurement of the malignant effusion and obtaining data for several immunological parameters. Results: Five pts (2 pts with gastric cancer and malignant ascites, 3 pts with breast cancer and malignant pleural effusion/ascites) have completed the study. MB311 was well tolerated with only two pts showing the easily manageable side effects nausea, vomiting (up to grade 2) and one episode of skin rash (grade 2) after the first application. Data of 4 pts were available for evaluating immunologic results and efficacy. In all pts significant levels of MB311 could be detected in the systemic blood circulation and the effusion leading to increased infiltration of CD45 positive immune cells (4/5 pts) and resulting in a reduction of tumor cell counts as detected by immunocytochemistry of effusion samples in 3/5 pts). Most interestingly, the pt with the highest LeY positive tumor showed a significant reduction of effusion volume after treatment—this decrease was also evident for Her2/neu positive tumor cells which were dramatically reduced after MB311 treatment in this breast cancer pt. Conclusion: MB311 was well tolerated in patients with malignant

A Comparison of One-Way and Two-Way Coupling Methods for Numerical Analysis of Fluid-Structure Interactions
Friedrich-Karl Benra,Hans Josef Dohmen,Ji Pei,Sebastian Schuster,Bo Wan
Journal of Applied Mathematics , 2011, DOI: 10.1155/2011/853560
Abstract: The interaction between fluid and structure occurs in a wide range of engineering problems. The solution for such problems is based on the relations of continuum mechanics and is mostly solved with numerical methods. It is a computational challenge to solve such problems because of the complex geometries, intricate physics of fluids, and complicated fluid-structure interactions. The way in which the interaction between fluid and solid is described gives the largest opportunity for reducing the computational effort. One possibility for reducing the computational effort of fluid-structure simulations is the use of one-way coupled simulations. In this paper, different problems are investigated with one-way and two-way coupled methods. After an explanation of the solution strategy for both models, a closer look at the differences between these methods will be provided, and it will be shown under what conditions a one-way coupling solution gives plausible results. 1. Introduction The interaction between fluids and solids is a phenomenon that can often be observed in nature, for example, the deformation of trees or the movement of sand dunes caused by wind. In almost the same manner, wind can interact with buildings, sometimes with dramatic consequences, such as the collapse of the Tacoma-Narrows Bridge in November 1940. These processes can only be calculated using laws and equations from different physical disciplines. Examples like this, where the arising subproblems cannot be solved independently, are called multiphysics applications. A very important class of these multiphysics problems are fluid-structure interactions (FSIs), which are characterized by the fact that the flow around a body has a strong impact on the structure, and vice versa; the modification of the structure has a nonnegligible influence on the flow. Two disciplines involved in these kinds of multiphysics problems are fluid dynamics and structural dynamics, which can both be described by the relations of continuum mechanics. On this note, FSI is a subset of multiphysics applications and is defined well by Zienkiewicz and Taylor [1]: Coupled systems and formulations are those applicable to multiple domains and dependent variables which usually describe different physical phenomena and in which neither domain can be solved while separated from the other and neither set of dependent variables can be explicitly eliminated at the differential equation level. Solution strategies for FSI simulations are mainly divided into monolithic and partitioned methods; this paper will focus only on
Phase I Dose Escalation Study with the Lewis Y Carbohydrate Specific Humanized Antibody IGN311  [PDF]
Daniel Oruzio, Günter Waxenecker, Christoph Aulmann, Bruno M?rkl, Theodor Wagner, Geert Mudde, Manfred Schuster, Norbert Eller, Andrea Mayer, Stefan Stranner, Gottfried Himmler, Hans Loibner, Günter Schlimok, Ralf Kircheis, Andreas Nechansky
Journal of Cancer Therapy (JCT) , 2011, DOI: 10.4236/jct.2011.25102
Abstract: Purpose: Investigation of safety, tolerability, pharmacokinetics, and anti-tumor activity of the Lewis Y-specific, fully humanized monoclonal antibody (mAb) IGN311 in patients with Lewis Y positive tumors in a Phase I clinical trial. Experimental Design: Twelve patients (pts) were enrolled in an open-label, uncontrolled, dose escalating Phase I study. Three pts received 50 mg, three pts 100 mg and six pts 200 mg IGN311 by i.v. infusion on days 1 and 15. Blood samples were taken immediately before infusion, and 0.5, 4, 8, 24 hours post infusion, as well as on days 3, 5 and 8 after the first and second infusion, respectively, and day 29. A final visit was scheduled for day 43. Results: No drug related adverse events were observed in the 50 mg and 100 mg dose groups. Three out of six patients in the 200 mg dose group showed drug related adverse reactions with nausea, vomiting and hypotension in one patient (NCI CTC grade 3) being the dose limiting toxicities. t1/2 of IGN311 was ~20 days after second infusion of IGN311. Sera of patients receiving IGN311 were capable of lysing Lewis Y positive tumor cells in vitro by both, complement-dependent cytotoxicity (CDC) and antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC). Circulating tumor cells found in the peripheral blood in two out of twelve pts prior to treatment were reduced after treatment to below the quantification limit of the detection method. None of the patients showed an increase in the number of disseminated tumor cells during treatment period. Conclusions: The good safety and PK profile, the biological activity regarding CDC and ADCC mediated tumor cell lysis, and the elimination of circulating tumor cells warrant further clinical investigation of IGN311.
Recombinant Expression and Characterization of Human and Murine ACE2: Species-Specific Activation of the Alternative Renin-Angiotensin-System
Marko Poglitsch,Oliver Domenig,Cornelia Schwager,Stefan Stranner,Bernhard Peball,Evelyne Janzek,Bettina Wagner,Helmut Jungwirth,Hans Loibner,Manfred Schuster
International Journal of Hypertension , 2012, DOI: 10.1155/2012/428950
Abstract: Angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) is a monocarboxypeptidase of the renin-angiotensin-system (RAS) which is known to cleave several substrates among vasoactive peptides. Its preferred substrate is Angiotensin II, which is tightly involved in the regulation of important physiological functions including fluid homeostasis and blood pressure. Ang 1–7, the main enzymatic product of ACE2, became increasingly important in the literature in recent years, as it was reported to counteract hypertensive and fibrotic actions of Angiotensin II via the MAS receptor. The functional connection of ACE2, Ang 1–7, and the MAS receptor is also referred to as the alternative axis of the RAS. In the present paper, we describe the recombinant expression and purification of human and murine ACE2 (rhACE2 and rmACE2). Furthermore, we determined the conversion rates of rhACE2 and rmACE2 for different natural peptide substrates in plasma samples and discovered species-specific differences in substrate specificities, probably leading to functional differences in the alternative axis of the RAS. In particular, conversion rates of Ang 1–10 to Ang 1–9 were found to be substantially different when applying rhACE2 or rmACE2 in vitro. In contrast to rhACE2, rm ACE2 is substantially less potent in transformation of Ang 1–10 to Ang 1–9.
Recombinant Expression and Characterization of Human and Murine ACE2: Species-Specific Activation of the Alternative Renin-Angiotensin-System
Marko Poglitsch,Oliver Domenig,Cornelia Schwager,Stefan Stranner,Bernhard Peball,Evelyne Janzek,Bettina Wagner,Helmut Jungwirth,Hans Loibner,Manfred Schuster
International Journal of Hypertension , 2012, DOI: 10.1155/2012/428950
Abstract: Angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) is a monocarboxypeptidase of the renin-angiotensin-system (RAS) which is known to cleave several substrates among vasoactive peptides. Its preferred substrate is Angiotensin II, which is tightly involved in the regulation of important physiological functions including fluid homeostasis and blood pressure. Ang 1–7, the main enzymatic product of ACE2, became increasingly important in the literature in recent years, as it was reported to counteract hypertensive and fibrotic actions of Angiotensin II via the MAS receptor. The functional connection of ACE2, Ang 1–7, and the MAS receptor is also referred to as the alternative axis of the RAS. In the present paper, we describe the recombinant expression and purification of human and murine ACE2 (rhACE2 and rmACE2). Furthermore, we determined the conversion rates of rhACE2 and rmACE2 for different natural peptide substrates in plasma samples and discovered species-specific differences in substrate specificities, probably leading to functional differences in the alternative axis of the RAS. In particular, conversion rates of Ang 1–10 to Ang 1–9 were found to be substantially different when applying rhACE2 or rmACE2 in vitro. In contrast to rhACE2, rm ACE2 is substantially less potent in transformation of Ang 1–10 to Ang 1–9. 1. Introduction The classical renin-angiotensin-system (RAS) is a proteolytic cascade which is constituted by multiple enzymes and effector peptides. The cascade starts when Angiotensin I (Ang 1–10) is released from the propeptide angiotensinogen by kidney-secreted renin. The peptide metabolites produced from Ang 1–10 by a variety of proteases act as ligands for angiotensin receptors in different tissues leading to a diversified panel of physiological functions mediated by angiotensin peptides [1]. Angiotensin II (Ang 1–8) is one of the most extensively studied angiotensin peptides. It is mainly produced by the proteolytic action of angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) by removal of the two C-terminal amino acids from Ang 1–10. Ang 1–8 is able to bind to several cellular receptors leading to a variety of physiologic effects among different tissues and cell types [2]. Importantly, increased levels of Ang 1–8 are reported to be associated with life-threatening pathologic conditions including hypertension, congestive heart failure, chronic kidney disease, and also tumor progression [3]. Ang 1–8 was described to directly increase blood pressure and vessel permeability, to induce Na reabsorption and ROS production and excert proinflammatory and proliferative
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