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Search Results: 1 - 10 of 2023 matches for " Hamish Morgan "
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Anthropology : a science of the non-event?
Morgan, Hamish
Cultural Studies Review , 2010,
Abstract: This essay explores the notion of the ‘event’ and it relevance to ethnography and community. It has developed from research work with Aboriginal people, especially the Jackman family, in central Western Australia. The essay sketches the possibility of developing another kind of ethnographic writing, one attuned to the relation with others, one that involves being-in-common with others. It focuses on developing a writing practice that is exposed to interruption, to fragments, to little happenings and encounters, to those shared events that happen in community. The essay sees community as the place of interruption: that to be with others is to be taken off, shown something else, exposed to unique turnings of the world that others give light to trace.
Anthropology: A Science of the Non-event?
Hamish Morgan
Cultural Studies Review , 2010,
Abstract: This essay explores the notion of the ‘event’ and it relevance to ethnography and community. It has developed from research work with Aboriginal people, especially the Jackman family, in central Western Australia. The essay sketches the possibility of developing another kind of ethnographic writing, one attuned to the relation with others, one that involves being-in-common with others. It focuses on developing a writing practice that is exposed to interruption, to fragments, to little happenings and encounters, to those shared events that happen in community. The essay sees community as the place of interruption: that to be with others is to be taken off, shown something else, exposed to unique turnings of the world that others give light to trace.
Linguistic Brilliance: Rule of Law with Chinese Characteristics  [PDF]
Hamish McCardle
Beijing Law Review (BLR) , 2019, DOI: 10.4236/blr.2019.102017
Abstract: Rule of law discourse has been excited in recent years with China’s reemergence as a state with global influence and its own interpretation of rule of law; a socialist rule of law with Chinese characteristics. If rule of law is to become a main theme of China’s socialist justice system building in the next ten-year period, then some of the changes will necessarily reach well beyond China’s internal system, potentially internationally. In terms of China’s approach, it is possible to understand that developments of rule of law are being made with due recognition of exactly how much implementation work is actually required to shift the country forward. China’s progress towards a socialist rule of law with Chinese characteristics will almost certainly be slow, measured and most importantly completed on China’s terms, not the West’s terms.
What transcripts are found in a human cell?
Hamish Scott
Genome Biology , 2000, DOI: 10.1186/gb-2000-1-1-reports031
Abstract: A total of 3.5 million transcripts was analyzed from 19 tissues (both normal and diseased, mainly cancer cell lines or primary tumor samples). From this, the number of genes in the human genome was estimated at around 84,000. The average number of different but related transcripts corresponding to each gene is 1.6 (134,135 transcripts total, mainly due to differences in polyadenylation). More than 43,000 transcripts were expressed in a single cell type (colorectal cancer cell lines) with expression levels ranging from 0.3 to 9,417 copies of the transcript per cell. Of the transcripts, 83% were present at levels as low as one copy per cell; 55 transcripts present at over 500 copies per cell made up 18% of the cellular mRNA mass (Figure 1a); and the most highly expressed 633 genes accounted for 45% of the cellular mRNA. Most unique transcripts were produced at low levels, with just under 25% of the cellular mRNA mass being made up of 94% of the unique transcripts (Figure 1b). Approximately 9,000 genes of known function and 63,000 genes of unknown function were matched to the transcripts; the remaining transcript tags, mainly from genes expressed at a low level (46%), had no matches in existing (public) databases (Figure 1c). Differences in gene expression between different cell types were greater than the changes in gene expression observed in different physiological states of a given cell type. Expression levels of tissue-specific transcripts present at more than ten copies per cell ranged from 0.05% to 1.76% (as a percentage of total cellular mRNA), and 50% of these transcripts had no database match. Approximately 1,000 'ubiquitously' expressed transcripts were detected and may be viewed as a minimal transcriptome.More information about SAGE is available from the Serial analysis of gene expression homepage and the SAGEmap site at the National Center for Biotechnological Information (NCBI). For information on cDNA microarray technology visit the Gene Chips (DNA Micro
Listening to the Learner: A Qualitative Investigation of Motivation for Embracing or Avoiding the Use of Self-Access Centres
Hamish Gillies
Studies in Self-Access Learning Journal , 2010,
Abstract: This paper reports on a follow-up study to Gillies (2007), in which a survey was conducted to investigate how tertiary-level Japanese EFL students understand and interpret their use or non-use of their institution’s self-access centre (SAC). The survey data revealed general trends regarding the factors which motivate the students’ use of the SAC as well as reasons why students choose not to use it, while also suggesting four types of students, via cluster analysis. Employing Dornyei’s (2005) L2 Motivational Self System as a theoretical framework, the current paper attempts to probe deeper into the survey data, and specifically tease out the factors influencing the use or non-use of the SAC. It reports on a set of semi-structured interviews with a purposeful sample of nine students from amongst the survey respondents. The interviewees included representatives of each of the four clusters identified in the survey data. The interview transcripts were then subjected to coding and labelling, and key themes in the data emerged: the SAC as an environment; the SAC as a community of selves; the SAC as contrasted with the classroom. Related to these themes, it was found that in the first year of university, identities are forged, distinguishing regular SAC users and rare SAC users. The SAC is an attractive environment for students with strong ideal L2 selves, while being uncomfortable for less confident students. The former type of student is more likely to see the classroom environment as restrictive, while the latter views it as sheltered and supportive. Meanwhile, the level of English proficiency is not in itself predictive of SAC use, but rather the level of L2 motivation, in particular the strength of the learner’s ideal L2 self. The paper discusses these themes and findings, and concludes with implications for the SAC, and suggestions for making the centre accessible and appealing to a wider cross-section of the overall student body.
CASA ESSAY: CICERO: PRO CAELIO: WHAT WAS IT THAT MOST UNDERMINED CLODIA’S CASE – HER CHARACTER, THE PREJUDICES OF ROMAN MEN, THE SKILLS OF CICERO OR …?
Hamish Williams
Akroterion , 2012, DOI: 10.7445/52-0-58
Abstract: The paper judged to be the best student essay submitted to Akroterion by November 30, preceding publication of the volume for that specific year, is published annually as the CASA / KVSA Essay. The competition, which is sponsored by the Classical Association of South Africa, is open to undergraduate students every year and to Honours students in even-numbered years. The winner receives a cash prize of R500.
Review: Viscount Haldane: ‘The Wicked Step-Father of the Canadian Constitution’, by Frederick Vaughan
Telford, Hamish
Journal of Historical Biography , 2011,
Abstract:
Agile Research
Hamish Cunningham
Computer Science , 2012,
Abstract: This paper discusses the application of agile software development methods in software-based research environments.
Information Extraction - A User Guide
Hamish Cunningham
Computer Science , 1997,
Abstract: This technical memo describes Information Extraction from the point-of-view of a potential user of the technology. No knowledge of language processing is assumed. Information Extraction is a process which takes unseen texts as input and produces fixed-format, unambiguous data as output. This data may be used directly for display to users, or may be stored in a database or spreadsheet for later analysis, or may be used for indexing purposes in Information Retrieval applications. See also http://www.dcs.shef.ac.uk/~hamish
To Lose Both Would Look Like Carelessness: Tasmanian Devil Facial Tumour Disease
Hamish McCallum,Menna Jones
PLOS Biology , 2012, DOI: 10.1371/journal.pbio.0040342
Abstract:
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