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Search Results: 1 - 10 of 874 matches for " HARI SUTRISNO "
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Moth Diversity at Gunung Halimun-Salak National Park, West Java
HARI SUTRISNO
HAYATI Journal of Biosciences , 2008,
Abstract: A study on moth fauna with focus on macro-moths was conducted at Gunung Halimun-Salak National Park from January to December 2007. The aims of the study were to acquire information of macro-moth diversity and to access the composition of the species at this area. Another objective of the research was to explore undescribed species of moths that inhabit this park. The result showed that a year collecting time with four sampling sites recorded only about 86% of estimated value in this park (846 of 983 species). Index diversity based on Fisher’s α is high. In addition, the number of families recorded from this park is also high, 29 families, or about half of the moth families that occur in Indo-Malayan region. Citiis site was the highest among other sites in term of the diversity index, while Gunung Botol is the lowest. These two sites have a few species in common. In general, Geometridae, Noctuidae, and Pyralidae dominate across all sites. The other significant finding of the research is that Dudgeonidae that has never been recorded from Indonesia was found at Citiis site.
Moth Diversity at Sebangau Peat Swamp and Busang River Secondary Rain Forest, Central Kalimantan
HARI SUTRISNO
HAYATI Journal of Biosciences , 2005,
Abstract: A study on the diversity of moths was conducted from July to Augustus 2004 at the peat swamp forest Setya Alam research station, Sebangau, Central Kalimantan. The result showed that diversity of moths at this area was lower (100 species of 12 families; H’ = 6.643, E = 0.794) than that in secondary rain forest Busang River (278 species of 19 families; H’ = 8.139, E = 0.831). The result also showed that the similarity index (Cj) of the two areas was very low (0.05). Geometridae, Noctuidae, and Pyralidae were dominant in both areas. There might be more species that have not been found during eight night sampling as indicated by the species numbers in both areas has not reach a plateau.
Evolution of a Wingless Gene and its Utility for Inferring the Relationships within Glyphodes Moths
HARI SUTRISNO
HAYATI Journal of Biosciences , 2006,
Abstract: The evolution of a nuclear Wingless gene was investigated and its utility for inferring the phylogenetic relationship within Glyphodes moths was assessed by comparing with other three genes namely, COI, COII, and EF-1α. The results show that the bias of base compositions in Wingless (C: 0.19) is the lowest among those in COI, COII, and EF-1α. The averages of nucleotide sequence divergences for comparison between groups based on the Wingless were the highest. While substitutions in Wingless and EF-1α genes were not saturated at the divergence of the species groups, COI and COII genes attained saturation at those levels. The phylogenetic analysis based on Wingless solely show that this gene was very useful to resolve the relationships between groups but gave a poor resolution at the specific level, i.e. the relationships within group 1 was not resolved. Combination of all data supports the phylogenetic hypothesis based on morphological data. Glyphodes falls into three species groups: group 2 branched off first then followed by groups 1 and 3.
The Impact of Storage Times of Museum Insect Specimens on PCR Success: Case Study on Moth Collections in Indonesia
HARI SUTRISNO
HAYATI Journal of Biosciences , 2012,
Abstract: Museum specimens are vast repositories of genetic information of interests to biological researchers. Since a new method in DNA extraction, a non destructive method, has been reported to be successful in extracting DNA of museum specimens even fossils without any morphological damages, using museum specimens as resources of genetic information for molecular studies is becoming popular recently. However, the PCR success depends on the quality of the specimens. To evaluate the impact of the storage times of museum specimens on PCR success,we conducted DNA extraction of 14 dry museum specimens of the moths collected from 1992 to 2010 by using a non destructive method. The results showed that the DNA specimens museum were fragmented into various sizes (100-1000 bp) depend on the storage times. On the other hand, fresh specimens which were preserved withinabsolute ethanol were almost not fragmented. The specimens of < 6 years old (2005-2010) succeed to amplify in 650 bp amplicon but for some specimens of 7 years old (2 of 3 specimens) resulted in a very weak amplification. These specimens, however, were able to amplify strongly in 300 bp amplicon. The results also showed that specimens of 1-19 years old were success to amplify in 100 bp amplicon.
Molecular Phylogeny of Agrioglypta Meyrick and Talanga Moore (Lepidoptera: Crambidae; Spilomelinae) Inferred from Nuclear EF-1 Gene
HARI SUTRISNO
HAYATI Journal of Biosciences , 2005,
Abstract: The phylogeny of the two closely- related genera, Agrioglypta Meyrick and Talanga Moore, was inferred from nucleotide sequence variation across a 973-bp region in the nuclear elongation factor-1 (EF-1 ) gene. Seven species representing the two genera and two outgroup species (Feltia jaculifera Guenée and Metallarcha aureodiscalis Meyrick) were analyzed. The results showed the averages of the p-distances in the comparisons between species within genus and between species belonging to other different genera were 3.5% and 4.9%, respectively. EF-1 gene had almost reached saturation at the level of the divergence of these two genera. The phylogenetic analysis using MP and NJ methods showed that each genus was found to be a monophyletic group and the species relationships within each genus were almost consistent as well. A. eurytusalis is the basal species in the genus Agrioglypta. In the genus Talanga, T. sabacusalis lied in the basal node and T. tolumnialis was found to be sister group of T. sexpunctalis.
Molecular Phylogeny of Indonesian Armyworm Mythimna Guenée (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae: Hadeninae) Based on CO I Gene Sequences
HARI SUTRISNO
HAYATI Journal of Biosciences , 2012,
Abstract: Armyworm Mythimna Guenée is one of the most important pests on graminaceous crops and pastures in South East Asia (i.e. M. separata Walker is well known to cause serious damages on rice in Indonesia). Like of most other genera of moths, the systematic of this genus is still in dispute, especially on the taxonomy and classification within this genus due to their morphological characters that are very difficult to distinguish from one to others. Molecular approaches such as using CO I gene sequence to differentiate among species has beenrecommended since this gene has ability to reveal the character identity at the specific level. In order to populate the genetic characters of Indonesian Mythimna, to clarify the clasification within the genus Mythimna and to reveal the phylogenetic relationship among them, we analyzed 14 species of Mythimna and two species outgroups (Spodoptera litura dan S. exigua) based on nucleotide sequence variation across a 649 bp region in the CO I gene. Over entire 649 bp region 72% of the nucleotide positions were constant, 10.6% were uninformtive (i.e. any variants were found in a single sequence) and 16.9% were parsimony informative. The informative site constituted in the 3rd codon position was the highest, whereas in 2nd codon position was the lowest. The results also showed that the base composition of this region was low A + T biased. The results showed that the monophyly of Mytimna was supported by 95% bootstrap test at any tree building methods. The three subgenera based on morphology were recovered but M. (Mythimna) shown to be a paraphyletic group in term of M. (Hyphilare), and M. (Pseudalteia); M. (Mythimna) was branched off first then followed by M. (Pseudaletia) and M. (Hyphilare). However, all internal nodes were least support except for the monophyly of subgenus M. (Hyphilare). It indicates that the relationships among internal nodes proposed here were least valid due to the number of species included in the analysis which may not be enough to represent the real number of species in the nature. More investigation was needed by including more species and other genes.
The Impact of Human Activities to Dynamic of Insect Communities: a Case Study in Gunung Salak, West Java
HARI SUTRISNO
HAYATI Journal of Biosciences , 2010,
Abstract: Huge areas of diverse tropical forest are lost or degraded every year with dramatic consequences for biodiversity. Human activities such as deforestation, fragmentation, over-exploitation, and monoculture practices are the main drivers of tropical forest biodiversity loss. Investigating of these threats with focusses on changes in species richness or species diversity will be able to minimize any impact of human activities at the early stage in a certain region. Therefore, to know the impact of human activities to dynamic of insect communities in Gunung Salak, West Java, we measured moth diversity and their structure within communities by comparing the index diversity, species richness and species composition across five different habitat types. The results showed that the habitat changes due to human activities had changed not only to the moth diversity but also to their structure within communities. The number of moth species decreased significantly as well as the number of lower taxa (family) in the disturbed forest (secondary forest, Agathis forest, and transition area) within ranges: 20-50 and 10-20%. The composition of the two main families, Geometridae and Noctuidae also showed a major change, family Geometridae decreased within ranges 10-50% in the disturbed area but Noctuidae increased up to 50% in those areas. Indeed, habitat lost due to human activities such as illegal logging, change of land use and land clearing is the main threats to decrease on macro-moth diversity and change their structures within communities.
A Comparison on Biodiversity between Private Conservation and Wildlife Reserve Forests in Riau by using Macro-moths as an Indicator
HARI SUTRISNO
Biodiversitas , 2009,
Abstract: A study on biodiversity of the two forest management types, private conservation forest PT. A and wildlife reserve forest of Suaka Margasatwa Giam Siak Kecil, Riau by using a rapid assessment approach with macro-moths as an indicator was conducted from 23 October to 6 November 2007. Four sample sites were established in Giam Siak Kecil Wildlife Reserve, whereas three sample sites were performed in private conservation forest PT. A. The results show that the diversity indexes based on Fisher’s α of the private forest PT. A was higher than those of wildlife reserve forest Giam Siak Kecil, they were 67.98 and 47.86, respectively. The species composition of the two forests is different, pyralid moths dominate at Giam Siak Kecil. On the contrary, Geometrid moths dominate at private conservation forest PT. A. The results indicated that diversity index and species composition in Giam Siak Kecil is influenced by habitat changes and decrease on floral diversity due to illegal logging. Moreover, a low faunal similarity which is indicated by Jaccard’s index that is only 0.218 showed that the samples represent significant different communities.
Synthesis and Characterization of TiO2(B) Nanotubes Prepared by Hydrothermal Method Using [Ti8O12(H2O)24]Cl8.HCl.7H2O as Precursor
Hari Sutrisno
Makara Seri Sains , 2010,
Abstract: Low-dimension TiO2-related material has been synthesized by hydrothermal treatment of [Ti8O12(H2O)24]Cl8.HCl.7H2O crystal as precursor in a 10 M NaOh aqueous solution at 150 C for 24 h. Characterization of the obtained product was carried out by a range of techniques including X-ray diffraction (XRD), high resolution scanning electron microscopy (HRSEM), high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), Raman spectroscopy and nitrogen adsorption-desorption isotherm (Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET)-Barret-Joyner-Halender (BJH)). From HRTEM, XRD and Raman spectra showed that the obtained product has a TiO2(B) structure. According to HRTEM observations, it was found that TiO2(B) has nanotubular structure with approximately 5-8 nm in outer and 3-6 nm in inner diameter. The BET surface area of TiO2(B) nanotubes is quiet large, values of 418.3163 m2/g being obtained. Pore structure analyisis by the BJH method showed that the average pore diameter of TiO2(B) nanotubes has 5.5781 nm.
Fotodegradasi Fenol dengan Katalis Titanium Oksida dan Tinanium Silikat Mesopori- Mesostruktur
HARI SUTRISNO,RETNO ARIANINGRUM,ARISWAN
Bioteknologi , 2006,
Abstract: The objective of this research is to study the fotodegradation of phenol by titanium dioxide and titanium silicate mesoporous-mesostructure accelerated by hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). Photodegradations were carried out in stirred slurries of mesoporous-mesostructure titanium dioxide and titanium silicate: 0.15 g TiO2-layered macrostructure, 0.35 g TiO2/MCM-41 and 0,5 g Ti-MCM-41 in deionized water respectively. Phenol solution (0,5 g/L) was illuminated by 160 W from mercury lamp at times various: 20, 40, 60 and 80 minute. The results show that TiO2-layered mesostructure followed by TiO2/MCM-41 are the two most active photocatalyst, while Ti- MCM-41 is not active photocatalyst. Organic substances produced from phenol fotodegradation include phenol → p-benzoquinon, hydroquinon → catecol → maleic acid → acetic acid and formic acid → water and carbon dioxide.
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