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Search Results: 1 - 10 of 149802 matches for " H. Huwald "
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Fiber optic distributed temperature sensing for the determination of the nocturnal atmospheric boundary layer height
C. A. Keller,H. Huwald,M. K. Vollmer,A. Wenger
Atmospheric Measurement Techniques Discussions , 2010, DOI: 10.5194/amtd-3-2723-2010
Abstract: A new method for measuring air temperature profiles in the atmospheric boundary layer at high spatial and temporal resolution is presented. The measurements are based on Raman scattering distributed temperature sensing (DTS) with a fiber optic cable attached to a tethered balloon. These data were used to estimate the height of the stable nocturnal boundary layer. The experiment was successfully deployed during a two-day campaign in September 2009, providing evidence that DTS is well suited for this atmospheric application. Observed stable temperature profiles exhibit an exponential shape confirming similarity concepts of the temperature inversion close to the surface. The atmospheric mixing height (MH) was estimated to vary between 5 m and 50 m as a result of the nocturnal boundary layer evolution. This value is in good agreement to the MH derived from concurrent Radon-222 (222Rn) measurements and in previous studies.
Fiber optic distributed temperature sensing for the determination of the nocturnal atmospheric boundary layer height
C. A. Keller, H. Huwald, M. K. Vollmer, A. Wenger, M. Hill, M. B. Parlange,S. Reimann
Atmospheric Measurement Techniques (AMT) & Discussions (AMTD) , 2011,
Abstract: A new method for measuring air temperature profiles in the atmospheric boundary layer at high spatial and temporal resolution is presented. The measurements are based on Raman scattering distributed temperature sensing (DTS) with a fiber optic cable attached to a tethered balloon. These data were used to estimate the height of the stable nocturnal boundary layer. The experiment was successfully deployed during a two-day campaign in September 2009, providing evidence that DTS is well suited for this atmospheric application. Observed stable temperature profiles exhibit an exponential shape confirming similarity concepts of the temperature inversion close to the surface. The atmospheric mixing height (MH) was estimated to vary between 5 m and 50 m as a result of the nocturnal boundary layer evolution. This value is in good agreement with the MH derived from concurrent Radon-222 (222Rn) measurements and in previous studies.
Spatial Rule-Based Modeling: A Method and Its Application to the Human Mitotic Kinetochore
Bashar Ibrahim,Richard Henze,Gerd Gruenert,Matthew Egbert,Jan Huwald,Peter Dittrich
Cells , 2013, DOI: 10.3390/cells2030506
Abstract: A common problem in the analysis of biological systems is the combinatorial explosion that emerges from the complexity of multi-protein assemblies. Conventional formalisms, like differential equations, Boolean networks and Bayesian networks, are unsuitable for dealing with the combinatorial explosion, because they are designed for a restricted state space with fixed dimensionality. To overcome this problem, the rule-based modeling language, BioNetGen, and the spatial extension, SRSim, have been developed. Here, we describe how to apply rule-based modeling to integrate experimental data from different sources into a single spatial simulation model and how to analyze the output of that model. The starting point for this approach can be a combination of molecular interaction data, reaction network data, proximities, binding and diffusion kinetics and molecular geometries at different levels of detail. We describe the technique and then use it to construct a model of the human mitotic inner and outer kinetochore, including the spindle assembly checkpoint signaling pathway. This allows us to demonstrate the utility of the procedure, show how a novel perspective for understanding such complex systems becomes accessible and elaborate on challenges that arise in the formulation, simulation and analysis of spatial rule-based models.
Euler-Lagrange Elasticity: Differential Equations for Elasticity without Stress or Strain  [PDF]
H. H. Hardy
Journal of Applied Mathematics and Physics (JAMP) , 2013, DOI: 10.4236/jamp.2013.17004
Abstract:

Differential equations to describe elasticity are derived without the use of stress or strain. The points within the body are the independent parameters instead of strain and surface forces replace stress tensors. These differential equations are a continuous analytical model that can then be solved using any of the standard techniques of differential equations. Although the equations do not require the definition stress or strain, these quantities can be calculated as dependent parameters. This approach to elasticity is simple, which avoids the need for multiple definitions of stress and strain, and provides a simple experimental procedure to find scalar representations of material properties in terms of the energy of deformation. The derived differential equations describe both infinitesimal and finite deformations.

Euler-Lagrange Elasticity with Dynamics  [PDF]
H. H. Hardy
Journal of Applied Mathematics and Physics (JAMP) , 2014, DOI: 10.4236/jamp.2014.213138
Abstract: The equations of Euler-Lagrange elasticity describe elastic deformations without reference to stress or strain. These equations as previously published are applicable only to quasi-static deformations. This paper extends these equations to include time dependent deformations. To accomplish this, an appropriate Lagrangian is defined and an extrema of the integral of this Lagrangian over the original material volume and time is found. The result is a set of Euler equations for the dynamics of elastic materials without stress or strain, which are appropriate for both finite and infinitesimal deformations of both isotropic and anisotropic materials. Finally, the resulting equations are shown to be no more than Newton's Laws applied to each infinitesimal volume of the material.
Linear Algebra Provides a Basis for Elasticity without Stress or Strain  [PDF]
H. H. Hardy
Soft (Soft) , 2015, DOI: 10.4236/soft.2015.43003
Abstract: Linear algebra provides insights into the description of elasticity without stress or strain. Classical descriptions of elasticity usually begin with defining stress and strain and the constitutive equations of the material that relate these to each other. Elasticity without stress or strain begins with the positions of the points and the energy of deformation. The energy of deformation as a function of the positions of the points within the material provides the material properties for the model. A discrete or continuous model of the deformation can be constructed by minimizing the total energy of deformation. As presented, this approach is limited to hyper-elastic materials, but is appropriate for infinitesimal and finite deformations, isotropic and anisotropic materials, as well as quasi-static and dynamic responses.
Spectral resolution in hyperbolic orbifolds, quantum chaos, and cosmology
H. Then
Physics , 2007,
Abstract: We present a few subjects from physics that have one in common: the spectral resolution of the Laplacian.
Arithmetic quantum chaos of Maass waveforms
H. Then
Mathematics , 2003,
Abstract: We compute numerically eigenvalues and eigenfunctions of the quantum Hamiltonian that describes the quantum mechanics of a point particle moving freely in a particular three-dimensional hyperbolic space of finite volume and investigate the distribution of the eigenvalues.
Maass cusp forms for large eigenvalues
H. Then
Mathematics , 2003,
Abstract: We investigate the numerical computation of Maass cusp forms for the modular group corresponding to large eigenvalues. We present Fourier coefficients of two cusp forms whose eigenvalues exceed r=40000. These eigenvalues are the largest that have so far been found in the case of the modular group. They are larger than the 130millionth eigenvalue.
Static Electric-Spring and Nonlinear Oscillations  [PDF]
H. Sarafian
Journal of Electromagnetic Analysis and Applications (JEMAA) , 2010, DOI: 10.4236/jemaa.2010.22011
Abstract: The author designed a family of nonlinear static electric-springs. The nonlinear oscillations of a massively charged particle under the influence of one such spring are studied. The equation of motion of the spring-mass system is highly nonlinear. Utilizing Mathematica [1] the equation of motion is solved numerically. The kinematics of the particle namely, its position, velocity and acceleration as a function of time, are displayed in three separate phase diagrams. Energy of the oscillator is analyzed. The nonlinear motion of the charged particle is set into an actual three-dimensional setting and animated for a comprehensive understanding.
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