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Search Results: 1 - 10 of 8260 matches for " Gupta SK "
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Knowledge, Attitude and Perception regarding National Health Programmes among villagers of Chauras, Tehri-Garhwal, Uttarakhand
Gupta SK,Sarawagi R
Online Journal of Health & Allied Sciences , 2010,
Abstract: Background and Objective: Since India became independent, several measures have been undertaken by the national government to improve the health of the people. Prominent among these measures are the national health programmes. The main objective of these National Health programmes are protection and promotion of national and individual health. The main objective of this study was to assess the knowledge, attitude and perception regarding various national health programmes among the villagers. Methods: It is a descriptive and observational study. The study subjects comprised 273 respondents belonging to 15 to 64 years age group. The collection tool used was a pre designed questionnaire, which was pre-tested. Results: 60% of respondents were adults, about 16 percent were educated up to primary level and more than 40% belonged to scheduled castes. Nearly 20% were aware about National AIDS Control Programme and 6.59% had clear knowledge about HIV/AIDS. Only 4.02% knew about the national vector borne disease control programme and 24% women clearly knew about exclusive breast feeding. Peripheral health workers were the most common source of information regarding these programmes. 64% of respondents opined that these national health programmes are good. Conclusion: Low level of knowledge was observed among the respondents regarding National Health Programmes.
Pulmonary effects of passive smoking: the Indian experience
Gupta D,Aggarwal AN,Jindal SK
Tobacco Induced Diseases , 2003,
Abstract: There are only a few studies done on pulmonary effects of passive smoking from India, which are summarized in this paper. Several vernacular tobacco products are used in India, bidis (beedis) being the commonest form of these. Bidis contain a higher concentration of nicotine and other tobacco alkaloids compared to the standard cigarettes (e.g., the sum of total nicotine and minor tobacco alkaloids was 37.5 mg in bidi compared to 14–16 mg in Indian or American cigarettes in one study). A large study performed on 9090 adolescent school children demonstrated environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) exposure to be associated with an increased risk of asthma. The odds ratio for being asthmatic in ETS-exposed as compared to ETS-unexposed children was 1.78 (95% CI: 1.33–2.31). Nearly one third of the children in this study reported non-specific respiratory symptoms and the ETS exposure was found to be positively associated with the prevalence of each symptom. Passive smoking was also shown to increase morbidity and to worsen the control of asthma among adults. Another study demonstrated exposure to ETS was a significant trigger for acute exacerbation of asthma. Increased bronchial hyper-responsiveness was also demonstrated among the healthy nonsmoking adult women exposed to ETS. Passive smoking leads to subtle changes in airflow mechanics. In a study among 50 healthy nonsmoking women passively exposed to tobacco smoke and matched for age with 50 unexposed women, forced expiratory volume in first second (FEV1) and peak expiratory flow (PEF) were marginally lower among the passive smokers (mean difference 0.13 L and 0.20 L-1, respectively), but maximal mid expiratory flow (FEF25–75%), airway resistance (Raw) and specific conductance (sGaw) were significantly impaired. An association between passive smoking and lung cancer has also been described. In a study conducted in association with the International Agency for Research on Cancer, the exposure to ETS during childhood was strongly associated with an enhanced incidence of lung cancer (OR = 3.9, 95% CI 1.9–8.2). In conclusions several adverse pulmonary effects of passive smoking, similar to those described from the western and developed countries, have been described from India.
Pulmonary effects of passive smoking: the Indian experience
Gupta D,Aggarwal AN,Jindal SK
Tobacco Induced Diseases , 2002, DOI: 10.1186/1617-9625-1-10
Abstract: There are only a few studies done on pulmonary effects of passive smoking from India, which are summarized in this paper. Several vernacular tobacco products are used in India, bidis (beedis) being the commonest form of these. Bidis contain a higher concentration of nicotine and other tobacco alkaloids compared to the standard cigarettes (e.g., the sum of total nicotine and minor tobacco alkaloids was 37.5 mg in bidi compared to 14–16 mg in Indian or American cigarettes in one study). A large study performed on 9090 adolescent school children demonstrated environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) exposure to be associated with an increased risk of asthma. The odds ratio for being asthmatic in ETS-exposed as compared to ETS-unexposed children was 1.78 (95% CI: 1.33–2.31). Nearly one third of the children in this study reported non-specific respiratory symptoms and the ETS exposure was found to be positively associated with the prevalence of each symptom. Passive smoking was also shown to increase morbidity and to worsen the control of asthma among adults. Another study demonstrated exposure to ETS was a significant trigger for acute exacerbation of asthma. Increased bronchial hyper-responsiveness was also demonstrated among the healthy nonsmoking adult women exposed to ETS. Passive smoking leads to subtle changes in airflow mechanics. In a study among 50 healthy nonsmoking women passively exposed to tobacco smoke and matched for age with 50 unexposed women, forced expiratory volume in first second (FEV1) and peak expiratory flow (PEF) were marginally lower among the passive smokers (mean difference 0.13 L and 0.20 L-1, respectively), but maximal mid expiratory flow (FEF25–75%), airway resistance (Raw) and specific conductance (sGaw) were significantly impaired. An association between passive smoking and lung cancer has also been described. In a study conducted in association with the International Agency for Research on Cancer, the exposure to ETS during childhood was strongly associated with an enhanced incidence of lung cancer (OR = 3.9, 95% CI 1.9–8.2). In conclusions several adverse pulmonary effects of passive smoking, similar to those described from the western and developed countries, have been described from India.
DEVELOPMENT AND CHARACTERIZATION OF SRM MICROSPHERES OF REPAGLINIDE
Gupta AK,Garg SK,Pal SK,Saxena M
Journal of Drug Delivery and Therapeutics , 2011,
Abstract: The aim of current work to develop and evaluate sustained release mucoadhesive (SRM) microspheres of Repaglinide using emulsification solvent evaporation technique. Effects of formulation variables i.e. polymer concentration and phase volume ratio on particle size, % mucoadhesion and drug release were investigated in this study. Scanning electron microscopy of microspheres with maximum drug content (Formulation CH1:8) demonstrated smooth surface spherical particles with mean diameter of 64.78 ± 3.26 μm. The mean Particle size, % drug loading and mucoadhesion were found to vary by changing the formulation variables. Microspheres size was significantly increased as increasing the polymer concentration in the aqueous phase while size of microspheres decrease as increase in volume of continuous phase. Decrease in size of microspheres leads to decrease in mucoadhesion time, % drug loading and faster the drug release. It can be concluded that the present mucoadhesive microspheres can be an ideal system to deliver the Repaglinide in sustained release manner for management of Type II Diabetes Mellitus.
Design aids for fixed support reinforced concrete cylindrical shells under uniformly distributed loads
S Chandrasekaran, SK Gupta, F Carannante
International Journal of Engineering, Science and Technology , 2009,
Abstract: Shells are objects considered as materialization of the curved surface. Despite structural advantages and architectural aesthetics possessed by shells, relative degree of unacquaintance with shell behavior and design is high. Thin shells are examples of strength through form as opposed to strength through mass; their thin cross-section makes them economical due to low consumption of cement and steel as compared to other roof coverings such as slabs. Current study presents design curves for reinforced concrete open barrel cylindrical shells for different geometric parameters. The analysis is done in two parts namely: i) RC shell subjected to uniformly distributed load that remain constant along its length and curvature of the shell surface; and ii) RC shell subjected to uniformly distributed load varying sinusoidally along its length in addition to different symmetric edge loads present along its longitudinal boundaries. Design charts are proposed for easier solution of shell constants after due verification of results obtained from finite element analysis. Expressions for stress resultants proposed in closed form make the design more simple and straightforward; stress resultants plotted at closer intervals of f can be useful for detailing of reinforcement layout in RC shells. Axial force-bending moment yield interaction studied on shells under uniformly distributed loads show compression failure, initiating crushing of concrete.
Fetus-in-fetu: A Rare Congenital Anomaly
SK Gupta, P Singhal, N Arya
Journal of Surgical Technique and Case Report , 2010,
Abstract: Two cases of fetus-in-fetu, on which we performed surgery in 2003 and 2006, are being reported. Both the cases presented with a lump in the abdomen. Radiology confirmed the diagnosis. The lumps were found in the retroperitoneum and successfully excised. Because of the rarity of the condition, these two cases are being reported with relevant salient features and are discussed in the light of available literature.
A rare case of disseminated cutaneous zoster in an immunocompetent patient
S Gupta, A Jain, C Gardiner, SK Tyring
BMC Family Practice , 2005, DOI: 10.1186/1471-2296-6-50
Abstract: We describe a case of disseminated cutaneous herpes zoster in an elderly man with no apparent immunosuppressive condition. The patient was treated successfully with intravenous Acyclovir.We suggest that disseminated zoster can occur in an immunocompetent host and should be promptly recognized and treated to prevent serious complications.Disseminated cutaneous herpes zoster has been described in persons with immunosuppression due to Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV), hematological malignancy, or chemotherapy. However, it is uncommon to see dissemination of zoster in healthy individuals. In this report, we describe the clinical course of a patient who presented with disseminated cutaneous zoster in the absence of a known immunosuppressive condition. A brief review of literature on this topic is also presented.A previously healthy 69-year old man presented with a 5-day history of severe pain over the right forehead and a 3-day history of vesicular eruption over right forehead, right eyelid, and nose. It was followed by the spread of vesicular eruption to involve chest, back and bilateral upper and lower extremities over next 2-days. Review of systems was negative. The patient did not have a history of chickenpox during childhood or any recent exposure to it. There was no past history of diabetes, cardiac or pulmonary disease, or lymphoma. The patient has not been on immunosuppressive or other medications.On examination, the patient was afebrile (37.4°C). He had vesicles and pustules, with crusting and swelling, in the distribution of the ophthalmic division of the trigeminal nerve (V1) including its nasociliary branch. Both eyelids were swollen, tender and red. There was no corneal involvement. Vesicles, pustules and scabs in various stages were also present over trunk and extremities (Figure 1). Palms and soles were spared and there was no lymphadenopathy. Pulmonary, cardiovascular and abdominal examinations were normal.Complete blood count, peripheral smear, routine
A Study of Protein Energy Malnutrition (PEM) in Children (0 to 6 Year) in a Rural Population of Jhansi District (U.P.)
Chakraborty S,Gupta SB,Chaturvedi B,Chakraborty SK
Indian Journal of Community Medicine , 2006,
Abstract:
REVIEW OF CLINICAL OBSERVATIONAL STUDIES CONDUCTED ON TISSUE HEALING AT I.P.G.T. & R.A., JAMNAGAR
Sathish HS,Baghel MS,Bhuyan C,Gupta SK
International Journal of Research in Ayurveda and Pharmacy , 2011,
Abstract: Main aim of Ayurveda is to cure the disease & maintain health state, which is divided into 8 main branches. Shalya tantra is a specialized branch which deals with surgical problems which afflict mankind. ‘Vrana’ and Shalya tantra seems to be inseparable. Vrana & process of healing is the core of Shalya tantra subject. On vrana more than 231 works in PG/PhD level has been reported from various institutions across India. Among these 19 works were carried out at Institute for Post graduate Teaching & Research in Ayurveda (I.P.G.T & R.A.). Out of 19 research works, 4 works are on Shuddhavrana while rests are on Dushtavrana, which includes one PhD thesis.Research works include clinical (13), experimental (03) and both Clinical – experimental (03). Single drug works include (Karanja, C.macleodii Hook & Jhinjireeta). Compound/Polyherbal preparations tried are – Yestiyadi Ghanavati, Chandraprabhaguti etc. 7 single drug formulation and 15 compound drug formulations were studied. The drug used in the research works has lekhana, shoshana, shodhana, kledahara, Krimighna with kashaya, tikta, madhura rasa, ushna virya, teekshna guna. Majority of preparations used in these research works are having ghee, oil and malahar base which symbolize this facilitate enhanced drug penetration for early and uncomplicated wound healing.
Evaluation of Random Urine Sample Protein-Cretinine Ratio as an Index of Quantitative Proteinuria
Sandeep Garg, Alok Kumar Gupta, Anurag Rohtgi, SK Sharma
JK Science : Journal of Medical Education & Research , 2004,
Abstract: The present study was conducted to find out a correlation between protein to creatinine (PC) ratio inrandom sample and 24 hr. urinary protein (UP) in patients with proteinuria with normal renal functions(serum cretinine<1.5 mg %) -group-I, with impaired renal functions, mild to moderate (s.cretinine1.5-4.0mg%) group-II and advance renal failure (s.cretinine >4.0mg%) -group-III. 24 hr. and arandom urine sample was taken for each patient and was tested for protein and creatinine. PC ratiowas found in each random sample. The mean 24 hr.UP (g/24 hr.) estimated by 24 hr. urine collectionwas 1.15± 0.97, 3.26 ±1.34 and 7.39±2.19 in group I, II and III respectively. However, the mean UPestimated by random sample was 1.35±1.09, 3.94±1.93 and 10.38±3.70 in group-1, group-II andgroup-III respectively. P value was statistically insignificant in group 1 & II. However, there wassignificant difference in values in group-III (P=0.012). Coefficient of correlation on univariate analysiswas r=0.889 in group-I, 0.788 in group-II and 0.375 in group-III indicating a significant correlation inresults in groupI and II and not in group-III. The results in the study have shown that single voidedurine method of estimating quantitative proteinuria holds its value in patients with normal, as well asin mild to moderately impaired renal functions. However, this method does not hold good for patientswith severely impaired renal functions.
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