oalib

Publish in OALib Journal

ISSN: 2333-9721

APC: Only $99

Submit

Search Results: 1 - 4 of 4 matches for " Gumphol Wongsuvan "
All listed articles are free for downloading (OA Articles)
Page 1 /4
Display every page Item
Burkholderia pseudomallei Is Spatially Distributed in Soil in Northeast Thailand
Direk Limmathurotsakul ,Vanaporn Wuthiekanun,Narisara Chantratita,Gumphol Wongsuvan,Premjit Amornchai,Nicholas P. J. Day,Sharon J. Peacock
PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases , 2010, DOI: 10.1371/journal.pntd.0000694
Abstract: Background Melioidosis is a frequently fatal infectious disease caused by the soil dwelling Gram-negative bacterium Burkholderia pseudomallei. Environmental sampling is important to identify geographical distribution of the organism and related risk of infection to humans and livestock. The aim of this study was to evaluate spatial distribution of B. pseudomallei in soil and consider the implications of this for soil sampling strategies. Methods and Findings A fixed-interval sampling strategy was used as the basis for detection and quantitation by culture of B. pseudomallei in soil in two environmental sites (disused land covered with low-lying scrub and rice field) in northeast Thailand. Semivariogram and indicator semivariogram were used to evaluate the distribution of B. pseudomallei and its relationship with range between sampling points. B. pseudomallei was present on culture of 80/100 sampling points taken from the disused land and 28/100 sampling points from the rice field. The median B. pseudomallei cfu/gram from positive sampling points was 378 and 700 for the disused land and the rice field, respectively (p = 0.17). Spatial autocorrelation of B. pseudomallei was present, in that samples taken from areas adjacent to sampling points that were culture positive (negative) for B. pseudomallei were also likely to be culture positive (negative), and samples taken from areas adjacent to sampling points with a high (low) B. pseudomallei count were also likely to yield a high (low) count. Ranges of spatial autocorrelation in quantitative B. pseudomallei count were 11.4 meters in the disused land and 7.6 meters in the rice field. Conclusions We discuss the implications of the uneven distribution of B. pseudomallei in soil for future environmental studies, and describe a range of established geostatistical sampling approaches that would be suitable for the study of B. pseudomallei that take account of our findings.
Factors Predicting and Reducing Mortality in Patients with Invasive Staphylococcus aureus Disease in a Developing Country
Emma K. Nickerson, Vanaporn Wuthiekanun, Gumphol Wongsuvan, Direk Limmathurosakul, Pramot Srisamang, Weera Mahavanakul, Janjira Thaipadungpanit, Krupal R. Shah, Arkhom Arayawichanont, Premjit Amornchai, Aunchalee Thanwisai, Nicholas P. Day, Sharon J. Peacock
PLOS ONE , 2009, DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0006512
Abstract: Background Invasive Staphylococcus aureus infection is increasingly recognised as an important cause of serious sepsis across the developing world, with mortality rates higher than those in the developed world. The factors determining mortality in developing countries have not been identified. Methods A prospective, observational study of invasive S. aureus disease was conducted at a provincial hospital in northeast Thailand over a 1-year period. All-cause and S. aureus-attributable mortality rates were determined, and the relationship was assessed between death and patient characteristics, clinical presentations, antibiotic therapy and resistance, drainage of pus and carriage of genes encoding Panton-Valentine Leukocidin (PVL). Principal Findings A total of 270 patients with invasive S. aureus infection were recruited. The range of clinical manifestations was broad and comparable to that described in developed countries. All-cause and S. aureus-attributable mortality rates were 26% and 20%, respectively. Early antibiotic therapy and drainage of pus were associated with a survival advantage (both p<0.001) on univariate analysis. Patients infected by a PVL gene-positive isolate (122/248 tested, 49%) had a strong survival advantage compared with patients infected by a PVL gene-negative isolate (all-cause mortality 11% versus 39% respectively, p<0.001). Multiple logistic regression analysis using all variables significant on univariate analysis revealed that age, underlying cardiac disease and respiratory infection were risk factors for all-cause and S. aureus-attributable mortality, while one or more abscesses as the presenting clinical feature and procedures for infectious source control were associated with survival. Conclusions Drainage of pus and timely antibiotic therapy are key to the successful management of S. aureus infection in the developing world. Defining the presence of genes encoding PVL provides no practical bedside information and draws attention away from identifying verified clinical risk factors and those interventions that save lives.
Development of a Prototype Lateral Flow Immunoassay (LFI) for the Rapid Diagnosis of Melioidosis
Raymond L. Houghton,Dana E. Reed,Mark A. Hubbard,Michael J. Dillon,Hongjing Chen,Bart J. Currie,Mark Mayo,Derek S. Sarovich,Vanessa Theobald,Direk Limmathurotsakul,Gumphol Wongsuvan,Narisara Chantratita,Sharon J. Peacock,Alex R. Hoffmaster,Brea Duval,Paul J. Brett,Mary N. Burtnick,David P. AuCoin
PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases , 2014, DOI: 10.1371/journal.pntd.0002727
Abstract: Burkholderia pseudomallei is a soil-dwelling bacterium and the causative agent of melioidosis. Isolation of B. pseudomallei from clinical samples is the “gold standard” for the diagnosis of melioidosis; results can take 3–7 days to produce. Alternatively, antibody-based tests have low specificity due to a high percentage of seropositive individuals in endemic areas. There is a clear need to develop a rapid point-of-care antigen detection assay for the diagnosis of melioidosis. Previously, we employed In vivo Microbial Antigen Discovery (InMAD) to identify potential B. pseudomallei diagnostic biomarkers. The B. pseudomallei capsular polysaccharide (CPS) and numerous protein antigens were identified as potential candidates. Here, we describe the development of a diagnostic immunoassay based on the detection of CPS. Following production of a CPS-specific monoclonal antibody (mAb), an antigen-capture immunoassay was developed to determine the concentration of CPS within a panel of melioidosis patient serum and urine samples. The same mAb was used to produce a prototype Active Melioidosis Detect Lateral Flow Immunoassay (AMD LFI); the limit of detection of the LFI for CPS is comparable to the antigen-capture immunoassay (~0.2 ng/ml). The analytical reactivity (inclusivity) of the AMD LFI was 98.7% (76/77) when tested against a large panel of B. pseudomallei isolates. Analytical specificity (cross-reactivity) testing determined that 97.2% of B. pseudomallei near neighbor species (35/36) were not reactive. The non-reactive B. pseudomallei strain and the reactive near neighbor strain can be explained through genetic sequence analysis. Importantly, we show the AMD LFI is capable of detecting CPS in a variety of patient samples. The LFI is currently being evaluated in Thailand and Australia; the focus is to optimize and validate testing procedures on melioidosis patient samples prior to initiation of a large, multisite pre-clinical evaluation.
Nutrient optimization of polyhydroxyalkanoate production from palm oil fiber by Ralstonia eutropha TISTR 1095 using response surface methodology
Piyarat Boonsawang,Thongchai Wongsuvan
Songklanakarin Journal of Science and Technology , 2010,
Abstract: Polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) is polyesters formed in several bacteria as a carbon or energy storage under some nutrientlimitation. Ralstonia eutropha has potential to produce PHA from various substrates, including carboxylic acids. In this research,the nutrient optimum to produce PHA from carboxylic acid was studied by using response surface methodology. Thecarboxylic acids were produced by anaerobic palm oil fiber fermentation for 7 days. Then Ralstonia eutropha TISTR 1095was cultured in fermented broth containing 840 mg/l of acids. The interaction of two factors at the same time was investigated.The effects of propionic acid, butyric acid, (NH4)2SO4 and K2HPO4 addition were examined. The result showed that the nutrient optimum for PHA production was fermented broth with nutrient addition (2.50 g/l propionic acid, 6.53 g/l butyric acid,1.53 g/l, (NH4)2SO4 and 0.03 g/l K2HPO4). The cell concentration, PHA concentration, and PHA content were 1.53 g/l, 0.70 g/l and 46.5%, respectively
Page 1 /4
Display every page Item


Home
Copyright © 2008-2017 Open Access Library. All rights reserved.